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Hi, everyone. We are currently considering purchasing a '96 DW on a full poured concrete basement on 8.5 acres. We really didn't want a MH but finances and circumstances currently may dictate otherwise.

An older woman lives there (her DH died several years ago) and she has not done a thing (including possibly cleaning!) since he died so things like the deck and covered porch he began are at a point that they need replacing. Other things it would need are new floor coverings where carpeting currently is, new sinks, faucets, etc. Other than these things though, it's a decent home on a nice 8.5 acres.

My questions are: Can a DW be remodeled like a regular stick-built home? Can you use regular kitchen cabinets or would these be too heavy for the MH walls to support? Can you take out/remove walls to change floor pattern? Can you make window and door openings larger if you correctly header them so that you can put in more or larger windows/doors?

Any other advice on MH's would be appreciated as we don't have much experience with them. I know most ppl don't really like them, but as I said above, current circumstances (and extremely overpriced local real estate market) may dictate that we go this way. Thanks!
 

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You can basically tear out and rebuild as with any other Home,just watch Load bearing walls.What I'm thinking though if you are buying this place I wouldn't put much value on the House,considering your having to basically rebuild it.

big rockpile.
 

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keep it simple and honest
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You mentioned both double wide and manufactured home. I believe
they are two different things, so maybe if you specify exactly which
you are talking about, you'll get a more definite answer.
Good luck.
Ann
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From my understanding, currently the term "manufactured home" applies to single and double wide "trailers". These differ from "modular" homes, which are basically stick-built homes put together in a factory and "squares" or "blocks" assembled on site. Modular homes are considered "normal" homes whereas single and doublewides are considered manufactured homes, even though I guess one could say that both are really "manufactured" in a factory. The home in question is a '96 DW, not a modular.
 

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If its a basement model with 2by6 construction its probably built just like a regular home. The newer models are much better than the old "tin tunnels" of before.
 

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The one area where d/w trailers are different from stick built is that the bathtub is usually shorter than the nomal 5 foot. So when replacing it you have to buy a mobile home specific one or move a wall to install fullsize. Also the faucet setup on a d/w bathtub is usually the handles and spout are in a straight line and most home stores don't carry anything which will fit. Cabinets and countertops are usually standard size.
Kirk
 

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Kirk said:
The one area where d/w trailers are different from stick built is that the bathtub is usually shorter than the nomal 5 foot. So when replacing it you have to buy a mobile home specific one or move a wall to install fullsize. Also the faucet setup on a d/w bathtub is usually the handles and spout are in a straight line and most home stores don't carry anything which will fit. Cabinets and countertops are usually standard size.
Kirk
Also, doors are usually shorter, both interior and exterior, and sometimes they're pretty darn narrow :haha:
 

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The construction and manufacturing specs are greatly different than they were a few decades ago. Some of the MH that we have seen have higher ceilings, better windows and doors than our site-built, stick-built 30 yr old home. Oh...and a huge whirlpool tub to die for.

With today's manufacturing standards (recognizing that just like on site builders there can be a huge difference in quality...) the legal difference between a manufactured home (which can be a single, double OR triple...sometimes even two stories) and a modular home is the code to which it was built. The manufatured homes are built to the HUD codes, the modulars to...oh dear, pregnancy brain strikes again...maybe IRC code?

Some of the best resources when remodeling a manufactured home will be the manufacturer...they will be able to identify as per the plans and construction specs which walls can be removed, etc...
 
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It might be money to the good to get another dw or a modular home built to your foundation that to try moving walls around on the current 8 year old model that needs that much work. Too much 'money pit' possibilites that when done you will have nearly the same invested, plus still an 8 year old dw.....

--->Paul
 

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Stay away from mobile homes. They are really not built well at all. We have a new one and lots of problems. We finally gave up trying to get ours level. The new back door is still giving us problems. Not worth the efforts to remodel one unless you are very handy, materials are cheap and the initial price is a steal. Trust me; don't do it unless you like lots of headaches.
 

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While I don't know all of the details to correctly assess the value of this particular MH and acreage, the fact that items such as sinks and faucets are already needing replacement, after 8 years of use by seniors, is a red flag looming on the horizon. If you're serious about purchasing this, have a well qualified inspector go over it with a fine tooth comb. The possibility of this dwelling being a money pit is a very distinct possibility.
 

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The manufacturer and type of construction ised is very important. There are many upgrades that can (and should) be made to a manufactured home to bring it to the point where it has longevity. The problems that you are anticipating having to fix really make me wonder what maker and what line this is. From what I understand many manufacturers have different lines which can vary widely in how solidly constructed they are...

I would really be antsy about buying a used MH. I *might* consider buying new if I could afford to chose a good copmpany and upgrade things like exterior wall and floor construction, roof pitch, etc.
 
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