Making straight lines while planning the acreage?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mountaineer, Dec 24, 2006.

  1. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    I'm planning out my 10 acre lot. I would really like the fencing part done right 'the first time' and am having difficulties figuring out how to get straight lines when the land is too long for any stringline. There will be a complete perimeter fence, an acre for home/veggies etc, there will be a number of small pastures, a small hayfield, orchard, etc etc which will be cross fenced.
    Not being a surveyor- how on earth do you get straight fencelines placed? The first side is over 2000' in length, and there is brush stopping a clear view. Do I have to clear it or is there a better way? The brush is in a horribly difficult to access ditch and clearing it would be expensive, I don'thave the equipment.
    It may be a dumb sounding question, but there must be a very simple solution as every fence around these parts seem to be in precisly positioned lines!
    Thanks for any help!!
     
  2. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Well, you could have a surveyor come in and shoot a line and mark it accordingly. Or you can just saw off the lower limbs of trees and clear small brush and do it yourself. Your string does not have to be all in one piece. You can do a hundred or two hundred feet at a time. You can also use stakes and flags in the ground if you don't want to use string but you are going to need a clear line of sight in order to make sure it is straight and true.

    Better get out your saw!

    donsgal
     

  3. KCM

    KCM Well-Known Member

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    You are probably going to have to cut the brush in order to install the fence anyway. You can easily run a string line 500 feet, get the orange nylon as it comes in up to 1000 feet lengths if you want (probably more).
    For your 2000 foot section, you could go 500 feet into your property from each end and then use the 3-4-5 triangle rule to make sure its perpendicular to the cross section. Then you'd only have the remaining thousand feet to mark out in a straight line.

    Or, Have you considered a better quality laser light and mark it out at dusk?
     
  4. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like an awfully skinny 10ac.:)
     
  5. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    transitor string out a roll of barbwire and pull it straight between points. Stakes and a level can beused by line of sightjust keep em lined up. :)
     
  6. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    transitor string out a roll of barbwire and pull it straight between points. Stakes and a level can beused by line of sigh just keep em lined up. :)
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    For the last 6 weeksI have been doing just what you are wanting to do. I am fanatical in attempting to get straight runs. My problem is that I have rolling hills that I cannot see over. I have several lengths of steel tubing that is used horizontally for chain link top rails. The ends of this tubing will slip fit into the next piece. I tie lots of survey ribbon on one end of the tubing. At the ends of the run of the fence I drive a steel rod into the ground leaving several feet protruding. I place the tube over the rod and thus have a tall pole with the survey ribbon fluttering. I get at the other end of the fence run and ask the wife to start placing the little wire flags using input from me via the cell phone as to the direction for placement. In places where she is out of sight I have another long pole with survey ribbon and use that to determine when everything is aligned. I do not trust pulling a string on long runs. I pull the 12 1/2 gauge high tensile wire from one corner post to the other corner post and use a wire tensioner to tighten the wire. I get the pulled wire very taut. Then I walk the length of the long pull and occasionally lift the wire as high as it will permit and then drop the wire. This action will assist in getting everything straight. Once satisfied, I use the taut wire to locate the line posts alignment. Things end up straight to the unaided eye.
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    I use fishing line. Ive got an old water reel that holds about 400 yds of 20 lb test. It will stretch pretty tight, and winding it back up is easy.

    Youll have to clear the fence lines anyway so youll have a "line of sight"
    Another way is to mount an old rifle scope or a camera on a tripod and use it to aim at a stake. Once you get a few corner posts set you pull a bottom wire tight before setting the line posts
     
  9. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Some applications allow you to place a parallel line to your property line if a clear line of sight is present parallel to what you wish to work with. Example is to measure over 20 feet at both ends, maybe 50 feet, ect.
     
  10. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Someone earlier this forum advised using a laser pointer at night. We did this but brush obscured one end, so went other direction.

    I like the high sight lines idea- poles with flags. Recall when setting fence posts you can line them up by sight so why not line up 10 ft high posts every few hundred at least over the areas ups/downs doesn't obscure view. Or if you can fix the toprail posts steady and still do the surveyor string from them.

    I use surveyor string but am trying to thread path through trees so no straight line over 200 ft so far- have had to pivot to avoid another few trees and then repivoted and inserted a gate to return closer to property line again.
     
  11. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    what is that 10 ac. side by side
     
  12. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everybody! I'll re-read later tonight, but there were a few ideas there that would work with equipment I have around here.
    Re the 2000', I might be wrong about that. The frontage is about 400' and it is basically a rectangle. I'll get exact measurements before getting any materials of course...
    Thanks again!
     
  13. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    pick up a roll of plastic baling twine should be around $12 for 10,000 ft
    comes in handy for a lot of things
     
  14. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    A ten acre rectangle that is 400' wide would be 1089' deep.

    From the way you describe the property, it must be relatively flat so with the brush cleared you might be able to see from corner to corner. (Assuming you correctly know where the corners are).
     
  15. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How will you build a straight fence without clearing the brush first?
     
  16. boxwoods

    boxwoods Well-Known Member

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    A compass would work. If you do it right!
     
  17. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I've got a single straight stretch of fence, even the last stretch built, through an open pasture.

    And in your case, it's gonna be hard to build straight, or at all, till you get the brush knocked down. True, it's doable, but I'd shore hate to have that chore!
     
  18. MWG

    MWG Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't say where you are from, but here we have our county on a GIS system. This has an ariel map along with the lot lines and other features of the land. I pulled mine up and a very large tree was on the line and I used it on a long stretch where I was fencing. (It too was on a hill) They just loaded 2005 photos and they are pretty detailed. I think they are taken from satellite. Not sure if that might help...
     
  19. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    Warning:

    Most places, the property lines on GIS maps are so more or less (inaccurately plotted) that little confidence can be placed on exact determinations from these maps. The line might appear to go right thru a tree, but that may not necassarily the case.

    GIS often means "Get-It-Surveyed" if you really want to know.

    Just consider, for a property to be accurately plotted on a GIS, then a whole series of determinations must correctly occur. The GIS must be setup by someone who knows very well what they are doing, then the property must have a complete and correct georeferenced survey (most properties do not) and that survey must be entered into the GIS correctly. The staff that most counties are able to hire are incapable of performing these tasks with a great level of confidence.
     
  20. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Before anyone can offereresonable advice we need to know a few things.Are your corners marked? How reliable is the marking? (ie.Surveyeror unclue tod vaugly pointingat that tree) What Is the topography? what are the neighbors doing? what can you do? what ideas have you had?