Making soap in a blender

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by southerngurl, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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  2. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd be cosmically careful using a blender, just in case the lid inadvertentaly became loose, etc. If I wanted soap that floats, I would just use the good ol' handmixer to whip it up before putting it into my molds, instead of the blender.

    For safety's sake, you should always wear safety goggles, long sleeves, and rubber gloves when making soap. Always keep a jug of vinegar nearby in case of lye spills on your skin!

    I noted that the pictures on the site show the soap being poured into a metal pan, which is not advisable as the lye will pit the metal as the soap is processing.

    Soapmaking is a lot of fun, but it is a project for which you must be very alert and safety conscious.

    Pony!
     

  3. deb

    deb Well-Known Member

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    :eek:NO, it isn't SAFE!!!:eek:

    Ever make a smoothie in a blender and have the lid fly off? Do you remember having to wipe smoothie goo off all the surfaces in a 4 foot radius? Ever have the blender pitcher tip over because it wasn't stable? Ever have the ingredients get stuck around the blender blades?

    When lye hits the water, the lye needs to be stirred very, very slowly so it dissolves completely. As the lye dissolves, the resulting lye solution heats up to around 250*. The lye solution is very thin so it splatters easily and it is hot enough to give you both chemical & heat burns. Even after mixing in the oils/fat, the resulting goo is still so chemically "hot" that you can get chemical burns when it hits your skin, eyes, etc. Any undissolved lye stuck around the blades will be especially dangerous since it remains at almost full strength.

    Making lye soap can be dangerous, but making it in a blender increases the danger 10 times.

    If you want to learn to make soap safely visit www.teachsoap.com or www.soapnuts.com

    deb
    in wi.
     
  4. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is scarey. When I make soap I always use the size of the lye container to determine the weight of the other ingredients. A 12 oz can of lye, or 18 oz can of lye, I use the entire container. I do this because I don't want to have to measure the lye, the manufacturer has done it for me.

    When making such a small batch, it will take a very long time to get the solution to trace. When making a small batch, most soapers use an electric stirrer. Using an electric stirrer (for making milk shakes in a glass) would be much safer, and you can add air if you'd like. I think it's just easier to make a larger batch (18 oz lye).

    I never use Crisco, but always natural ingredients. If you are going to the trouble of making your own soap, use the finest ingredients (pomace olive oil -food grade) is cheap when you think about it, and can be combined with even cheaper oils, such as coconut. Adding coconut oil also makes a soap with a richer lather.
     
  5. TabletopHomestead

    TabletopHomestead Well-Known Member

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    Don't know if it's safe, but I do it all the time. But then again, I also can goat's milk and eat raw egg mayonaise. LOL.

    I make 2 pound batches without difficulty. I don't guess I've ever had a blender lid fly off making anything. Of course, I could just be inordinately lucky.



     
  6. TabletopHomestead

    TabletopHomestead Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I get less caustic splatters using the blender than from using either a stand mixer or stick blender.