Making "replacement windows" into "new construction" windows?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cc-rider, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Is there a way this can be done? I got a GREAT bargain on some new windows at Home Depot this past fall. I bought 12 or 13 windows ($3K value) for about $500. They are all insulated, low-e, argon, etc.

    I will be building a cabin/home soon, and figured I could use them and would just build to fit the windows.

    I got them home and bragged to my son about my good deal and he pointed out that they are "replacement" windows, not new construction. He said they could be used, but were a pain in the butt to install in new construction.

    Can I do something to them to make them easier to install? Screw a flange or something around the outside??

    My other thought was to sell them to someone else, and buy new, but I don't think I could ever find a deal like this again! 5 of the windows are 4' x 4' (thinking sunroom here!) and the others are nice sized.... 36" x 72", etc.

    Thanks for your advice!
    Chris
     
  2. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I used a couple of these once in my house. I built the rough opening so there was about 1/16" in gap around the window, then filled it with expanding foam sealer. I put aluminum flashing uround the exterior of the wiondow, and caulked the flashing to the window to seal water out, then sided over the flashing
     
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  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I know a lot of folks are asking 'what's the difference'? So I'll ask it first.
     
  4. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    I believe (in my uneducated state of bliss) that the only difference is that the new construction windows have a nailing flange and you just nail it into a rough opening.

    The replacement windows don't have a flange and are meant to sit in the opening and butt up against the "stop" and then you nail another "stop" behind them, I think.

    I've never put a replacement window in, and didn't pay much attention when my ex-dh did. I've put in new construction windows (my chicken coop!) however!

    I guess my thinking was that I'd have to frame in the rough opening, nail in a "stop" at the front in the frame, put the window in, and then caulk and put a stop and/or window trim to frame out the rest of the window. Dunno.
     
  5. UncleD

    UncleD Well-Known Member

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    New Construction windows typically have a flange on the outside perimeter.
    With new construction, you can install the windows before installing the siding
    and screw through the flange into the framed window opening from the outside.

    Replacement windows do not have this flange. So you need to flash the exterior, then install the windows. You can attach them through the sides of the window frame. Just drill and countersink through the side window tracks and run your screws into the framed opening. It's not hard at all. Just make sure you run your flashing back far enough so you can caulk the window to the flashing on the inside. Otherwise you could have leaks.
     
  6. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    I wouldn't give up $3,000 worth of windows simply because they are harder to install.

    Seems to me that windows in the 19th and most of the 20th century would not have come pre-flanged. Easily dealt with.
     
  7. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Do I need flashing? I guess I was thinking I'd put some sort of stop against the front (street-side) and caulk it well. Then put the window against that and caulk it again. And then put trim inside and caulk it again.

    If I have flashing, it will show, won't it?? (Sorry to be so clueless!)
     
  8. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When it comes to vinyl windows, I actually PREFER replacements to new construction windows.....and I get them the same way you did, by finding them at Home Depot and places where somebody mis-measured them for a replacement situation ( where the hole already exists, and the window must fit THAT hole ). Last time I bought some, I got two pallets of them......all with LowE glass, etc, for 50 bucks/window. These were normally 200 buck windows !

    They are simple to install. Frame the open to the window size + about 1/16 to 1/8" bigger all the way around. I set mine flush with the outside sheathing. The holes are already predrilled in the side jambs of the window windows...usually one set up top on the inside track, and one set down low on the outside track.....you may need to remove a coverpiece to see the holes. They also generally even furnish the screws.
    I discard the expander top pc and the little vinyl pc that goes at the bottom on a sloped sill of a replacement situation.

    THEN I make a 'moulding' out of 2x2 wood to go around the outside, nailing it to the sheathing. I then bend aluminum trim coil to match the window color or siding color in a "U" shape, covering that wood and returing into the window. Caulk at this point. You could also just paint the wood or use a vinyl brickmoulding they sell at HD. IF you don't use aluminum like I do, you need to make sure the bottom pc is sloped away from the window so you don't trap water at that point.

    Then install your siding up to the moulding. I like the look of this better than 'new construction' window, as they generally have no moulding around the outside and look cheap IMHO. And the new construction windows with the built in "J" channel for vinyl siding is a leak waiting to happen at the bottom corner IF you don't install the vinyl correctly....and VERY VERY few do.
     
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  9. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    very simple, put on an outside stop just like the old double hungs have, screw in the windows and put an inside stop on. caulk and paint or bend aluminum to cover outside and caulk.
     
  10. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Does the moulding go over the seam where the window and opening meet, or does it just come flush to the opening?

    I'm not sure if I'll have sheathing because I was thinking of using lapped cedar siding. I don't like the look of aluminum flashing, either, so will probably just caulk the heck out of it. :)
     
  11. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I recently hung a big bunch of new windows from HD.

    the 'new' ones have a rubbery plastic flange tab aroudn the outside. If you don't like it, then cut it off.

    The 'replacement' windows are square and flush.
     
  12. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can lap the moulding just a bit if you want or not....personal preference I'd say. The aluminum trim coil is NOT just a plain, aluminum mill finish.....like aluminum foil.....I'm tallking a painted or PVC coated trim coil that looks DANG good up next to a vinyl window.

    Here's an example of a replacement window used in a new rental I built about a year ago. Note the tan aluminum PVC coated coil matches the tan window.

    [​IMG]


    All replacement windows are 3 1/4" deep ( front edge to back edge ) since they are designed to replace two normal wood sashes which are 1 5/8 thick each. This means on the inside, you need to make a small 'extension' trim jamb.....I use 3/4 inch lumber, and rip it to match the depth from the window to the flush face of the drywall.....since I build with 2x6 walls, that generally amounts to a 2 3/4" wide pc of wood. I used red oak in this house, along with red oak casing that laps over the edge of the extension jamb, leaving about 3/8" of the 3/4" showing.

    [​IMG]

    As to no sheathing......don't know what you're building, but if it's a house, sheathing makes it much stronger, tighter and more resistant to air infiltration...it's NOT a corner I'd cut.
    I've put lap siding ( I use white pine that I saw myself ) on shed, but even then I'm bracing the corners well with let-in type braces because the lap siding doesn't do enough to prevent a wall from racking.

    By the way, I install replacement windows for a living among other things, if anyone has questions on windows, I can probably help ya.
     
  13. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Those are some huge windows. Would the 36x72 ones be installed vertical or horizontal. I would use them in the sun room and the 4x4s in the living quarters. Do they open????
     
  14. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    TnAndy really has the best explanation of how to do a quality professional job here. I would add a few comments. If you are going to use aluminum trim coil to cover the wood, use PVC coated material. It doesn't cost too much more than plain, and it looks 100% better. Also don't just drive trim nails into the surface. Predrill the aluminum with an 1/8" bit, then nail until the colored head just touches the surface. Too many people install coil stock like they are driving framing nails, and ruin a good job. Too many nails also ruin a good job. This wrap can be installed with little, or no nailing on the wide face of the trim board. Last, don't waste your time caulking vinyl siding with standard (acid cure) silicone caulk, it simply doesn't stick to vinyl. It will look good, then peel of shortly. Good luck on your good buy.
     
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  15. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Yes, the windows all open. I don't think you could use the 36X72 windows horizontally. I tried doing that with a couple that I put in the chicken coop and then don't open right, or fit tight in the frames well. Seems like they sag in the middle and fall out of the frames easily. Next time, if I want vertical windows, I'll buy vertical windows instead of turning horizontal windows.... horizontally! :)

    The reason I was thinking 4X4's in the sunroom was so that I could have some massive storage below them. Stone or tile or something.
     
  16. rhouse86

    rhouse86 New Member

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    Hey folks- New user here. Was trolling the net looking for information about using replacement windows in place of new construction windows and found this thread. I realize it's quite old, but there's good info here, and I was wondering if TnAndy still had those pictures of the work you did. I'd really like to see those.
    Thanks in advance!
    Ryan
     
  17. Fishindude

    Fishindude Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No reason at all you can't use those.

    Build a framed flashed opening just slightly larger than the windows, shim windows into position and anchor solidly, caulk inside and out, trim on interior as necessary.
     
  18. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    I always hate to respond to off topic issues, but just had to ask. You said no to sheathing, using cedar lap siding. What I picture is stud walls, 2x4 or 2x6, with lap siding nailed to it. I don't think you want to do that. Help me visualize this, please.

    With your windows, you'll want a sill running out past the siding, for water to drain off the window without getting into the wall. Could build the opening with room for a sill for the replacement window to sit on.

    I know building inspectors are fussy on vapor barrier. Without a flange, they could give you a hard time about that. Perhaps they won't know?
     
  19. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Make the rough openings about 3/8" larger than the windows and add alignment boards across all the corners. Then shim them just like a door. Foam the gap and add your outside moulding and window returns/sill as needed. Not hard at all.

    WWW
     
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