making goat milk

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TexasArtist, Jun 17, 2006.

  1. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,693
    Joined:
    May 4, 2003
    I've made goat milk about 2 or 3 times now and it's always turned out good. This time though it won't set firm it's like soft butter for some reason. Is there something I've done wrong? Here's my steps
    1) collect enough cream
    2) put in jar with lid on
    3) shake like a crazy person (the jar not me!) :)
    4)put it into butter container and into fridge.

    I posted this on the cooking forum but nobody has answered in 3 days so I'm trying you fine folks for answers
     
  2. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

    Messages:
    3,086
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Do you mean you made goat butter? :D

    Could it be that your goats are eating something different? I'm not a goat person so these are all ignorant guesses, but maybe it's affecting the consistency? Or maybe too much liquid mixed in with the solids? Heck, is it possible that a kid is nursing from her too much? Or maybe even another nanny's kid?

    Or maybe your goat is sick, not to scare you.....I'm sure someone here can help you! Did you ask on the goat forum?

    I just recently bought some store-bought goat milk because I prefer it to bovine milk, and drank the whole carton over a few days. My 5-year old freaked and suggested I'd better buy more and SOON! He loves that stuff. Maybe I should buy a goat. ;)
     

  3. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,693
    Joined:
    May 4, 2003
    yup I sure did make goat butter.
    She lost her baby and I started milking her a couple months back because I had a baby that lost her mommy and she needed the goat nutrition. Belle has been off the milk for weeks now so I'm the only one taking the milke. Unless of course I have to much to drink for myself then the dogs get whatever milk from the days milking. You've never seen happier dogs! :) :) :) Sweetpea isn't on any different diet. Pasture all day except she get her bucket of nibbles while being milked out. The milk will turn a different color or show signs of illness and plus I test her so she's good on that part.
    Maybe I did have a little milk in there and just didn't relize it. Back to the milking board I guess.
     
  4. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    I've never had much luck at all making butter from goat milk due to the much lower fat content.
     
  5. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,828
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2002
    Location:
    Dyersville, Iowa
    If you're not allergic, try adding a little cow milk to the goat milk so it will separate out more completely. Add the cow milk and let it set for a day. Skim off the goat cream and proceed by doing the butter making boogie. :D
    .
    You didn't say exactly what the problem was but if it's too runny or not turning into butter-try the cow milk trick-it worked great when I was milking 23 Alpines. :)
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    LOL! My first thought was that the goats make the milk, you just have to collect it.

    I haven't tried making butter out of goat's milk, but I know it's hard to get the cream separated out. KY's suggestion is definitely worth a try!
     
  7. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Northeast Kingdom of Vermont
    I don't think the butterfat content is actually that much lower, especially in the smaller breeds and the Nubians. It is that goat's milk is naturally homogenized, and the fat globules are suspended evenly throughout the milk. If you let the cream rise, you won't get a whole lot.

    To be really successful making goat's milk butter, you need a cream separator. And be sure the milk is warmed then fridge temp, or it will clog the machine and not "make."
     
  8. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,082
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    North Central Arkansas
    You silly people should really go to the goat boards to make yourselves comfortable with caprine reality.
     
  9. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    Hoping that Westwood was maybe just off his feed since it was late when he posted..
    Unlike cows, the fat content of goats milk does vary from time to time..so when I said that goat milk has a "lower fat content" , that was misleading.what I OUGHT to have said was that, goat milk CAN have a variable fat content. If anyone is interested, here's a nice article..and of course, there is the goat forum
    which is chock full of folks who have goats, have had goats and love goats :)

    http://drinc.ucdavis.edu/goat1.htm
     
  10. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    391
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    I'm afraid you're mistaken about that. The butterfat content of both cow's milk & goat's milk varies with the stage of lactation---lowest at peak production, and increasing as milk production falls off at the end of lactation. It's universal.

    What you wll find is how quickly the butter comes when you churn varies a lot over a lactation too. Sometimes you need to churn *much* longer to get butter than other times. I'd suggest TexasArtist tries making the butter in a food processer. That way one can churn as long as it takes without going mad.

    Something you need to keep in mind with making dairy products from your own beasties' milk is that the solids content of storebought milk is standardized, but homegrown milk is not. It changes from week to week. And the way the solids content changes over time has an enormous impact on butter and cheese making, so you won't always get the same results even if you do it exactly the same everytime. You learn to compensate for this, but it takes thought and effort---and an understanding of the process.
     
  11. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    See? isn't it nice to learn stuff?
    Thank YOU!!
    I thought that you could always make great butter from cow's milk, since the fat always remained at a high level no matter where the lactation cycle was..unlike goats..DUH and double DUH..never too old to learn new things. :)
     
  12. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    609
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Location:
    MA
  13. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,693
    Joined:
    May 4, 2003
    I know how to do it. I've already made butter before. I'm just trying to figure out why this one didn't turn out.
     
  14. Nature_Lover

    Nature_Lover Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    I've never made goat milk butter, is it like cow butter with respect to having to rinse it with cool water to get milk out so it doesn't become rancid?

    Maybe you shook air into it?

    Or left too much liquid in by not using cool, then cold, water to rinse it?
     
  15. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,693
    Joined:
    May 4, 2003
    yup did the rinse thing. Everything was normal. The only thin I can figure is I either msut have had a bit to much milk or shes in the part of her milking where I'm just not gonna get enough cream from her :Bawling:
     
  16. robinkd2

    robinkd2 Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2002
    Location:
    Carthage, TX
    when cow cream won't turn to butter, momma always had us throw an ice cube or two into it. I would think the temperature of your cream was the difference. If it is too warm, you can shake till doomsday and not get it to set. Robin
     
  17. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

    Messages:
    3,086
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Just a question: if goat's milk has less fat in it, why does it have more calories than cow milk? It has about 20 calories more per cup. Also, what would the fat content of raw goat's milk be?

    The dh has mentioned jokingly that maybe we should start a goat farm. A 4 litre bag of cow milk here is about $3.75....and 4 litre of goat's milk is $9.00!!!!!
     
  18. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Northeast Kingdom of Vermont
    Goat's milk doesn't have less fat than cow's milk. It varies from breed to breed and from animal to animal---the difference is that goat's milk is naturally homogenized. The fat globules are evenly distributed throughout the milk and formed in such a way that the cream does not separate as readily or as easily as cow's milk.
    In fact, some sources I've read on the subject indicates that goat's milk has a HIGHER butterfat content than cow's milk...

    I think most goat's milk also falls in the range of about 4.5% on up to 6.5%.

    HTH!