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Discussion Starter #1
Although there are many ways to split a hive into 2 or more, the simplest way I have found is thus:

Using a 10 frame hive in early spring, after the queen has started laying a good brood pattern, and you aren't expecting anymore DEEP freezes.
Find the queen and place her and the frame she is on into another box. Next, find a frame containing unhatched eggs. Keep that frame in the original box. Divide the remaining 8 frames between the 2 boxes, giving each as near equal honey, pollen, and brood as possible. Remove the box with queen 10 feet or more away from the original stand. Most of the foragers will return to the original location and boost the queenless hive. The bees will make queen cells from the newly hatched larva in the queenless hive. The queen in the second box will continue to lay and build the hive back to full strength. Both hives should be fed until they are at a strength where they no longer need it. It is best to use drawn comb to fill out the 2 boxes, but foundation can be used successfully.

If I have left anything out, please ask and I'll try to answer, or maybe others can add to this.
 

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Iddee Is having the one colony make a new queen from your queens eggs.

Here in the north you can start a split just as soon as night temps are staying in the low 40F range.
A queen can be bought, then 5 frames of brood and 5 of foundation with the old queen is in a bottom hive body. A second hive body with 5 frames of brood with 5 frames of foundation are placed on top with a double screen board with the entrance the oppsite way between them. They tend to help keep each other warm on some of the cooler nights. When the boughten queen is laying good and the nights warm up a bit more move them to a new location.

:D Al
 

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Lost in the Wiregrass
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if your producing queens of a certain sort how do you control what drones are available,

i think i read somewhere that a TopBar hive produces more drones than a normal hive so would it be good to keep a TopBar or two around of a certain kind to be sure that the drones available are the kind you want?

also sence the hive is makeing a new queen out of several possibilitys are you able to get more than one queen successfully out of this split or does the first queen out kill all the others?
 

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The commonly accepted version is that the virgin queen will travel some distance (a mile or more) away from her home hive to mate, thus avoiding mating with her own pool. The drones produced locally establish localized drone congregation areas (DCA) and mate with queens traveling to them. As a biologist (and often controversial thinker), I wonder though....A huge amount of hive resources are spent rearing/caring for drones that have no purpose in breeding?? Seems to me that while she would prefer to mate with an unrelated drone, if no unrelated drone is present- she would simply to do what her instincts have programmed her to do. Again- this line of thought goes contrary to every book I've read so take it for what it's worth.

David
 

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Lost in the Wiregrass
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well if thats the case you could theoretically have your normal hives set up at one location to produce queens, and if the topbar hive does produce more drones then set them up a little away from the queen hives so that they can be in the right distance to be of service,

but then of corse there is no telling if there are any wild hives nearby and or where the queen goes then to mate??

is there any differince between "WILD" bees and thoughs that have been in a bee keepers hive for several generations? well except for the Africanized bees that is,

is it good to get non africanized wild blood into typically "domesticated" bloodlines?
 

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KSALguy said:
set them up a little away from the queen hives so that they can be in the right distance to be of service,
It is my understanding that this is how the large commercial queen breeders function- They call the outyards Drone saturation areas. Designed to ensure that an abundance of drones are available when the queens fly by.



KSALguy said:
is it good to get non africanized wild blood into typically "domesticated" bloodlines?
In my opinion, wild genetics are very necessary. Any critter that has developed coping mechanisms for mites/diseases without treatment is some genetics I want in my bees. My luck is that they really won't be feral but will be the result of a swarm from "over the hill" at another beekeep that I didn't even know existed.....
 

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Could you use Al's method (with double screened board between the deeps, entrances facing opposite ways) and *not* buy a queen but let the bees raise a new queen as in Iddee's original post?

Seems like that would give you the benefit of more warmth plus known bloodlines. The best of both methods.

Unless the bees won't make a new queen if they smell the old queen through the screens?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ally????

I have never tried it, but I would think it would work if they started q-cells. I would think you could place a solid board between the two screens until the cells were started, then remove it. Again, I have never tried it. I am much farther south than Ally, so temps. aren't that much of a concern.
 
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