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Discussion Starter #1
I found a ewe today on the wrong side of the electric fence in an adjoining pasture where she could have been up to two days. The wires were bent down so I assumed she had gotten stuck in the fence and was shocked quite a bit before getting through.. Our voltage is 7500v.She acted pretty unsteady and lethargic, so I brought her into barn. Than I discovered hundreds of thread like worms in her fleece and on her backside. So I sheared her and found several gashes on her back legs and rump, all crawling with larger maggots (?). We put her in a large tub and soaked and scrubbed her with Lysol and chlorox and sprayed all the open areas with Catron to kill off any emerging maggots. Not sure what could have got her. Now there doesn't seem to be any more. I gave her one dose of BOSE and started her on Thiamine for five days for any nerve damage she might have had from the electric shocks. Her temperature was 101, but I started her on Penicillin as a precaution to ward off any infection. She is standing but as of yet not eating or drinking. I am syringing water into her.There was no water where she was and it was in the 80's here. Any suggestions? Kate in NY
 

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Gosh that's tough - the poor thing! It sounds like you are doing just about everything you can - maybe add some molasses to the water you are syringing into her- they suggest that in a sheep book I read, for a weakened ewe or lamb, to help bring back appetite. Good luck - hope she makes it!
 

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How much damage did the maggots do? Much? Keep fly spray on her or some pine tar to make sure the flies don't come again and make more maggots. Are her gums the normal pink or are they pale or blue? You can talk to your vet about some Banamine for the pain...it might help her get back on her feed (I had a ewe with a high fever, lethargic and off her feed and some Banamine got her back to eating and the fever down within a couple hours. It is a prescription though, so you'll have to get it from your vet unless you have it around, and you may still want to ask the vet if its suitable to give her it. I used the same dosage per pound as for a horse or cow). Keep up with the drenching with water until she starts to drink on her own. You might try giving her some Sheep Nutri-drench...just glucose, vitamins and minerals and helps get them some energy. Don't overdose on the Thiamine....not sure how much would be overdoing it though. I'd put some iodine on the wounds to keep them free of bacteria. Penicillin sounds good...are you using a higher dosage than the label says? That dose isn't effective really. Anyways, good luck, and I hope she starts doing better soon. Make sure you have very tempting hay and a little corn or soybean meal, or whatever grain she eats, if she eats grain, and add some molasses just to make what you are offering as appealing as possible. My sick sheep first started picking at her hay, then started licking the powdered molasses up, and then when she felt even better, she went for the soybean meal, and then she started eating her corn. Good luck.
Leah
 

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Some good ideas! I add black coffee to most of my drenches, the caffeign does perk them up. Sheep are supposed to lose Vitamin A when stressed, so a shot of that would probably help. What ever comercial rumin booster you can get might help too. I wonder if you should maybe move one step ahead of Banamine, and use Dexamethasone? Dex boosts metabolism as a side effect. Might get her eating again too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the good ideas and advice. My vet suggessted giving her buffered aspirin in molasses which I did and she was chewing her hay this afternoon. I am also giving her Keto Gel (propylene glycol and electrolytes) twice a day . But tonight she seems too wobbly to stand although she tried a few times. I am syringing her water and handfed her a little grain today . I am also giving her Penicillin twice a day ( 10cc) and Vitamin B complex once a day ( for helping the damaged nerves to heal). I understand that they can go awhile laying down and urinate etc. lying down.
But I am concerned that she could have permanent nerve damage. Time will tell. Of course she is my best colored ewe, a Romney with a beautiful silver fleece. It does look like we got all the worms. I am using the Catron around the wounds as well. Would pine tar be beneficial on the wounds?Does it keep the flies away? I do have a can I never used.

As far as my fence goes, its a 6 strand hi-tensile electric.But around our barnyard we just put up Premiers Green Cote woven wire 32" and than electric hi-tensile wires above that and one electric off-set wire on the outside. I'm thinking thats a better way to go. Less dangerous to the sheep, but still adequate protection, even in a power failure. We are moving to another farm in about 2 years so I am planning ahead on the fences.
 

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Pine tar keeps flies away, but I've never put it on wounds, but I put it right around the wounds to keep the flies out of the area. THe woven wire with a strand on top and middle would be good. I'd put the middle strand on the side with the sheep so they don't rub on the fence. YOu may also consider a strand on the bottom if you have any animals that might dig under to get to your sheep.
Leah
 

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Would any of you put lysol, chlorox or pine tar on a human's wound? In general most animals skin is more sensitive to chemical irritants than people. Try just soap and water.
 

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George, have you ever had maggots in a wound? I don't know many who have. I am an animal lover, but I do not usually compare them to humans when talking about care.

Sheeplady, we always used bluekote when we had that kind of trouble. Spraying it on is preferable to touching it to me (there is no barfing smiley ;) ) Anyway, hope your girl does alright!
 

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No, if we humans had maggots we'd likely go to the hospital, at least if we had health insurance. We can't compare animals...especially livestock which aren't pets...to humans. If I had a sheep with maggots I'd be doing what works to get rid of the maggots, and then anything that works to keep flies away to prevent future infestation. I used diluted clorox on my arm when I had ring worm, I use it on horse's hooves with thrush, etc. Have you ever tried to kill maggots? Nothing really works...we've only had them in bedding and we tried bleach, fly spray, etc and we ended up having to burn all that manure. I'm sure no people are castrated in the same manner of lambs either. Soap and water won't kill the maggots and it won't repel flies, and depending on the type of soap, may not even do much to prevent further infection. Pine tar works better at repelling flies since it stays on for a LONG time. Plus, as I said, I don't put it in the wound, just around it. And...I don't know if if would even be all the irritating since the only shampoo that I've found to work on my dog's hot spots when she had a flea reaction and a food allergy had pine tar as its main active ingredient and it smelled strongly of pine tar. Haha, I've used many products on myself meant for veterinary purposes!
Leah
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just to update all. Our ewe is still with us!!!!!!! :)

Its been a long week... I stopped the Penicillin after 5 days. She is still on Vitamin B Complex ( with Thiamine) for another week.Also had her on Keto Gel and Probios for her rumen. And, I am giving her aspirin dissolved in Molasses for pain.Per the vet, 10 adult Buffered Aspirin twice a day. ( You give that many due to the many stomachs they pass through for anyones information. She is up by herself now, eating some grain, some hay , fresh grass and drinking some water. Her skin is like leather, about 2/3 of her body where all the maggots had chewed on her. My vet assures me that new skin will grow under and this will slough off, sort of like a bad case of dandruff and she will look like h--- during this. But she is alive, a miracle in itself. :) I bought some equine fly wipe spray, which I wiped on her to keep flies away.
George, we used Lysol in the water to kill the maggots, per my vet, as plain soap won't do it. And there were thousands :eek: . Even into her rectum. Nasty!
Only used a little Chlorox, mostly to disinfect the tub, brushes and us. Another few hours and she would have been beyond saving, so whatever works... Anyway, after an initial struggle in the tub, a 50 gallon Rubbermaid Water Tank, she stood perfectly still while three of us scrubbed away for nearly half hour. It had to feel good to get rid of those gnawing parasites.
We are not out of the woods yet, but frankly I thought we would have had her buried long before this. Hope springs eternal! Kate in New York
 

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Wow, what a great story, you indeed have a miracle to have pulled her through that! If she's standing and eating some, that's an excellent sign! I'd probably continue giving fluids unless she's making a difference in the water level of her bucket..... great job!
 

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In livestock, once. Cleaned it with soap and water then covered the wound with a mixture of vaseline and topical antibiotics, healed up fine

Cara said:
George, have you ever had maggots in a wound? I don't know many who have. I am an animal lover, but I do not usually compare them to humans when talking about care.

Sheeplady, we always used bluekote when we had that kind of trouble. Spraying it on is preferable to touching it to me (there is no barfing smiley ;) ) Anyway, hope your girl does alright!
 

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George, I wish it was just a small wound and area. I tend to be conservative with treatments myself. But this required aggressive treatment if we were to save her.
We are talking about 2/3 of her body covered by maggots and imbedded deep into her skin ( hence the massive leathery scar tissue. Shw wacalready into shock. We literally had to squeeze and pull and flush hundreds of larger ones out, lying deeply buried. )
You know who your friends are, when they pitch in to help do this. My co- workers were gagging just listening to our saga. :)
 

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I don't think I have ever had one quite that baddly infested! The reason i like Boroform is it is meant to be used topically and litterally draws the maggots tot hesurface. Reinfestation is a very serious concern at this point. They can be under that leathery skin. If you can lift any portion to check do so, and if you can get a can of Boroform try spraying a little near the edge. I hope she continues to do well but your right to remain conservative with her chances. A dilute iodine wash isn't a bad way to start, and I have used a dilute javex foot soak, that must sting, (I have tried the same solution on my own cuts and it is not pleasant. Of course having little flesh eating parasites isn't pleasant either. Pity Ivomec or Delice won't work.
 

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Maggots are nasty but they do get rid of any necrotic tissue so the wounds will at least have fresh flesh that heals better. (Kind of a jing/jang outlook.) Good luck.

Maggotts also help to break down manure, and feed my chickens!
 

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GeorgeK said:
Would any of you put lysol, chlorox or pine tar on a human's wound? In general most animals skin is more sensitive to chemical irritants than people. Try just soap and water.
I have use these on myself too, the only thing I haven't used on my self is coppertox.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
She is still with us! And improving daily!! Little by little.

I added alfalfa pellets to her grain to get some natural vitamin A in her for skin regrowth.Aside from that I am only medically treating her now with injectable Vitamin B Complex.She is slowly eating grain, hay and drinking water.And getting up and down now without difficulty. I have her in the horse stall by herself still, although there are other sheep in that barn.

I did buy some horse/ livestock spray for flies, which I put on a rag and wiped her down with to keep flies away. It seems to be working.
Russ, I don't know how I would check for maggots under the leathery portion of her hide as there doesn't appear to be any open areas at present and I am not about to cut into her.
Whats Boroform? Like Catron spray? Kate
 

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Hmm I don't know what Catron spray is so, we're still in the dark here. I'll grab and can tomorrow and post what is in it and who makes it. Just spraying it along the edges will find any holes if there are maggots under the skin. End of a long weekend and I've been swamped with doggie biz.
 

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Wow, I just read through all the posts. I do feel for you. Growing up we had a few sheep. It was wet rainy, I don't remember all that led up to it, but the short story is they had maggots all in their wool and flesh. We sheared them and hand scooped maggots off. (I had to do this once with a calf that was born a ways from the barn and not found for a few days and when we found him he was full of maggots.) It was by far the worst job I ever had to do around animals. I really really hated it and have never forgotten. I refused to raise sheep because of that experience. Well, I now have two rams and I spray, shear, keep near the house and check all the time, because I am not dealing with those maggots again!! When we treated for maggots we sheared, hand cleaned and used an iodine mixture. With the calf we also shot with Penicillin. (that was quite new to us then to have syringes and meds. in the barn. Before then it was always call the vet. But vets got busier and blah blah) You are right about the maggots being hard to kill without using something so toxic it did more harm to the animal. We would spray and flush the wound with the iodine solution and this seemed to cause the maggots to crawl out of the wound where we would hand pick them off. (A long, nasty job) We would do this repeately through out the first day and then for a few more days getting the last of the maggots and keeping the wound clean to stop reinfest. The stained hands, the smell all of it, you have brought back some nasty memories and I feel for you. Good luck and I am glad to hear things are on the improve. Rick
 

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Catron Spray is a excellent Spray to keep flys off and kill maggots in wounds for all livestock. Also has healing properties.
Ross here is some info on it. In fact, I found this is the best product for this type of problem.
But my Vet did say in heavy fly areas like my Farm, to use it Twice a day, everyday until the wound(s) are healed.

http://www.productionvalues.us/product_sites/CatronIV/reference.html

Kate sorry you have to go through this, but sounds like you are doing an outstanding job getting her better!!
 
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