Mad Sheep

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by minnikin1, Nov 17, 2006.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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  2. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought the post was going to be about A sheep with Rabies. While I disagree with the procedures that have been used,. I can to A point understand the why.But that does not mean its right.
     

  3. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    The "disease similar to Mad Cow" would most likely be Scrapie.

    A scrapie infected flock would be a problem (it's incurable, and infected animals are destroyed) but the article doesn't really make it clear what "carrier" really means.

    Hard to say what really went on.
     
  4. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    The author was on the radio yesterday and talked a little about it.
    It was not scrapie, all her sheep repeatedly tested negative during a 2 year quarantine.

    Here's a link for a transcript of what I heard or an audio clip:
    http://www.loe.org/shows/segments.htm?programID=06-P13-00046&segmentID=7

    After watching the handling of Florida Citrus Canker, none of this seems
    a stretch to me any more. USDA is a bureaucracy run amok.
     
  5. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I've read it. It was horrible. The USDA put them under a two year quarantine and, as you said, they never tested positive for anything. And yet the USDA repeatedly told people the sheep had BSE...yeah, mad cow, not scrapie! Sheep don't get mad cow; they never have, they never will. The only case of mad cow in sheep was when the lab purposely injected it directly into the sheep's brain.

    The USDA finally found a lab that would say the sheep had BSE, although the slides were dirty and it was found out later (much later) that the lab wasn't ever inspected, which should have been done in order for them to be authorized to run these types of tests. And, amazingly, all the 'evidence' (the remainder of the sheep's brain that had been tested) had been destroyed, making it impossible for a legitimate lab to run tests. The USDA and the vet who ran the tests both lied under oath, and the judge still sided with them; the Fallice's had not been compensated for their flock at the time the book went to press.

    Run amok...that's putting it mildly.
     
  6. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Well I've just finished the book and I'm speechless.

    First I want to say that anything I've ever said on HT encouraging someone to voluntarily seek out or cooperate with goverment programs was a BIG mistake and I'm so SORRY!

    We are currently enrolled in a couple of government ag "programs" and, based on what we've learned from this book, the NAIS debacle, and a recent personal encounter we've had with Uncle Sam - we want OUT.

    We will quietly cease to participate with the programs even though it means the loss of some grant monies.
    We just want to slip under the radar from here on out.
     
  7. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    You know that a beef company wanted to test 100% of their cows for BSE so that they could resume selling to Japan; the USDA got a court order to stop them from doing so, saying it did not want any US beef growers to test 100% of the cattle even to use it for competitive market advantage because they might find a false positive that would affect the entire industry.

    Sector profit is apparently more important than safety or even than rational marketing strategy; would you pay $0.25 more per pound for 100% tested-negative beef? That is the sort of thing that a company testing 100% could do to get an advantage over its non-testing competitors. But the USDA won't allow them to test.

    It also takes months to get a result back on any test of a cow for BSE. In one case the USDA tested 7 times, all of them positive, before finally admitting that a downer cow was a BSE case, months later.

    The USDA is in the pocket of corporate farming and are no longer effective as a regulatory agency. All they do is harass the little farmers and protect the interests of big ones, with little to no concern for consumer safety. Even their anti-bird-flu 'biosecurity for the birds' page, which is aimed at small poultry producers and bird fanciers, is so buried on their site as to be nearly un-findable. If the little guys get wiped out, so much the better for the corporate poultry farms.
     
  8. GrannyCarol

    GrannyCarol Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And, in the shuffle for big business to make their buck, our food supply becomes less and less safe and food quality and nutrition is down the toilet!

    I would so much rather buy beef from my rancher friend, whom I know and I know how he keeps his cattle, then from the supermarket. I've been doing that for a year now, I love it. I know the butcher, the rancher, I could probably meet the cow I am going to eat later! I've found a source for chicken too. We grow our own ducks and duck eggs. I still want to have sheep and get milk and meat, but my husband isn't so excited about that yet. I looked into rabbits - I've a friend that would set me up entirely except for my trio, she used to breed show bunnies and had a couple of hundred of them and has all the left over equipment! There again, my husband isn't too keen on it.

    We are awfully tied down here, esp now that the kids left home. :(
     
  9. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Not only that, but I learned from this book that each time they found a case of BSE in the US, the USDA DECREASED the number of cattle they tested.
    The old we-can't-see-it-if-our-eyes-are-closed trick! :shrug:
     
  10. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    You are fortunate to have the alternatives to supermarket food. Spread the word - the more folks like you "vote" with thier pocketbooks, the better.

    Good luck getting dh excited about the sheep project. It took some time for my hubby, too.
     
  11. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    No need to apologize, Minn...I think we'd all like to think that these programs are set up to protect us. What the Fiallace's went through was unspeakable and certainly not something anyone deserves to have handed to them by the very agency that is supposed to protect us.

    I've been a bit skeptical of the border opening between the US and Canada, personally. Some folks here who do field trials with their dogs were thinking of getting a few dog trained sheep from there, but I pointed out that they would likely have scrapie...not really, of course, but that someone would be made a whipping boy just to prove the point that we need to have better tracking systems (never mind that they'll have been able to track that animal back to prove they need a better system.)

    Anyway, I hope everyone can get their hands on a copy of the book. It's an eye opener...at least for those who have an open enough mind to allow their eyes to be opened.
     
  12. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    And to think some folks think NAIS is a good idea. The USDA can't even do things right now,, what makes folks think that NAIS would be any better?
    It would be worse, much worse IMHO.

    I too buy sides of Beef from a local rancher. I know what these cattle are, what they are fed and how they are handled.

    This is part of the problem as far as the USDA and NAIS people are concerned.
    More and more people are opting for going Certified organic and/or buying from local sources.
    They don't want to protect us...they want to force us to eat the factory Farm swill.

    The way things are now...I could fight the USDA. If NAIS comes into law...we have signed all our rights away. They can come in and take our animals or land if they think we did any wrong by them. They legally own our animals.
    Oh,,,am going to stop now...getting to frosted. :flame: