Lye paint?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cashcrop, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    Years ago folks used to make a sort of lye paint. Does anybody know what the recipe combination was? We have an outhouse that was painted with it and I need to replace several of the boards. Since it has held up extremely well(40 or 50 yrs) with the lye paint I'd like to coat the new boards with a like coating.

    Thanks!
    Katie
     
  2. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    I've not heard of making lye paint, could it have been lime? as in whitewash?
    Historic Whitewash Formula
     

  3. mamagrrl

    mamagrrl Member

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    Lye is generally used to remove paint, not as paint... that I know of, anyway.

    I'd have to agree with Taterspa and wonder if maybe you heard 'lye' when the fellow said 'lime'? I only know about whitewash, which is a little lime (usually a powder in the states) and a lot of water, basically. Let it sit for a day or so before using unless you can get fresh lime putty (just keep the lime under the water level.) I usually roll on limewash with a big old thick paint roller but I have used one of those water toys that squirts large amounts of water for fairly long distances. That was a hoot and terribly popular even with the visiting adults. I just finished whitewashing our bathhouse - well, I should really put on another coat, but I might just wait until spring...

    Want to come help? I could, um, Teach you. Yeah, that's it. I could Teach you how to limewash! C'mon, it's fun! I'll bet you learn fast! (shades of Huck Finn...)
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lime paint or whitewash as it was called here usualy only lasted a couple years. I have never heard of lye paint either. Everyone was using lead paint years ago. I guess lead don't sound like lye however.
     
  5. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    It could be lime. It's got a grayish color to it. Guess I'll have to experiment and look at that historic recipe.
     
  6. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My last house (120 years old) had a lot of milk based paint that sounds a lot like what you describe. (And it took quite a bit to remove that stuff, too!) It also had lime in it.

    I found the following recipe at

    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/recipe.html

    They have other paint recipes there as well.


    1870 Milk Paint Formula

    1 Quart skim milk (room temperature)
    1 Once of hydrated lime by weight
    (Available at building centers. Do not use quick lime, as it will react with the water and heat up. Hydrated lime has been soaked in water then dried.)
    1 to 2 1/2 pounds of chalk may also be added as a filler.
    Stir in enough skim milk to hydrated lime to make a cream. Add balance of skim milk. Now add sufficient amount of powder pigment to desired color and consistency (Pigment powder must be limeproof). Stir in well for a few minutes before using. For best results continue to stir throughout use. Apply milk paint with a cheap natural bristle brush. Allow project to dry sufficiently before applying next coat. Extra paint may be kept for several days in the refrigerator, until the milk sours. Double or triple the recipe for paint. Allow to dry thoroughly 3-4 hours before use. For extra protection, give paint a coat of oil finish or sealer. Color may change - test in inconspicuous area.


    Pony!
     
  7. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    There is also something out there called lime wash I discovered when I typed lime paint in a search engine.