low rpm chainsaw chain

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Junkmanme, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. Junkmanme

    Junkmanme Well-Known Member

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    Howdy,
    I have 3 chainsaws.a McCollough, a Stihl (favorite), and an electric (small) made by WEN (the solder-iron people). I've got some physical restraints presently, so I'm using the electric, which is light-weight and NO START-CORD PULLING!

    It works fine, but rather slow......I'm wondering if there is a chain-type that cuts better at low RPM (the electric is much slower than a gas-type)....

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Bruce
     
  2. GREENCOUNTYPETE

    GREENCOUNTYPETE Moderator Staff Member

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    hard wood or soft wood I am not shure about chain speed but there are deffinitly differences in chain for wood type they change the angle of cut.
    also in the portion of the chain just before the tooth that gauges the depth of cut. if your saw isn't bogging down at all you could change the depth of cut.
     

  3. Junkmanme

    Junkmanme Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Pete.
    I'llconsider the "depth of cut" idea.....I presume that one would "file off" part of the top of that guide tooth in order to increase the "depth of cut"?
    -Bruce-
     
  4. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    Skip tooth chain has fewer teeth and is best on all smaller hp saws, it has about half the number of teeth that a full comp chain has.....

    The rakers need to be filed with a flat file every couple or three times of sharpening the chain, if they get to short you wont get the sawdust out of the cut and it will bog down, to high and you dot cut as well.... there is a gauge made for learning the proper hieght for the rakers...... If you are using the anti-kick chain it to needs filed but in doinig so will make the anti-kick function not function or inhibit the action so be ware.

    And cleaning the bar groove isnt a bad idea either, not many folks do that, and the build up of oil and dirt and dust raise the chain off the bar..... on a bar that has had several chains worn out, you may need to have it regrooved or "trued up" which will keep the chain straight while cutting and not wander all over the place and use more power than it should and work the sawyer doublely hard as well.

    William