Love my Oberhaslis

Discussion in 'Goats' started by BirdWoman, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. BirdWoman

    BirdWoman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Location:
    Nevada
    Hi, I'm new to the forum, but a friend recommended it and it is great. I have a small starter herd of Oberhaslis at my Nevada guest ranch. We also house a Christian boarding school and the girls have absolutely fallen in love with my beautiful goats. I bred them late because we have really cold winters and I can't always babysit as closely as I would like, so I don't want the babies born until it warms up. My first babies won't come until in April. Can't wait. Are there any other Oberhasli herds within 200 miles of Ely, NV? That is pretty close to my location. Does anyone want to buy bucklings if I have any?
    P.S. Hope this works because I've never been on a chat line before.
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Hi, I'm in (near!) Klamath Falls, Oregon -- too far from you, which is too bad, because I would like to have an Oberhasli buck, or a half Oberhasli and half Boer one. I'm going to have some 3/4 Boer kids (1/4 Oberhasli) later this month, and hope to be able to trade one of them for a half-Boer buck kid out of a really good dairy doe. Even better would be purebred Oberhasli, but I probably won't find anyone willing to trade a purebred for a 3/4 Boer. The mom is half Oberhasli and half Boer, and a good doe, and supposed to be a heavy milker, though I haven't seen her in milk yet. I like her quiet temperament and sturdy build. Oberhasli's are my favorite of the larger dairy breeds (my other goats are Kinders, which are my favorite of all goat breeds). I think Obers are beautiful.

    I bred my Kinder doe to kid late (end of April), also, for the same reasons as you. But the Ober X Boer doe I just bought from over in the Willamette Valley, where the winters are warmer, and she's due in the next two or three weeks. Right now, March is being nice -- I hope it stays that way!

    Kathleen
     

  3. BirdWoman

    BirdWoman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Location:
    Nevada
    Now I'm going to look like a real novice -- I've never heard of a Kinder goat. What kind is a Kinder? Sorry you're so far away. I've been curious about Boer and thinking of trying a couple for the meat. Do you have a few?
     
  4. BirdWoman

    BirdWoman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Location:
    Nevada
    Sorry, I just realized how ugly that sounds -- I want some goats for meat, do you have some? Didn't mean it quite like that. I'm actually very good to my goats most of the time.
     
  5. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    LOL!! Don't appologize! Our goats are all dual-purpose, for meat and milk!

    Kinders are half pygmy and half Nubian. Mine are all fourth or fifth generation, but one of my doe kids looks like she'll end up about pygmy size (her twin sister is the size she's supposed to be). It takes a while to get crosses to breed true to what you want them to be. If you are interested, do a little research on Kinders, and you could search the forum here, too, as several of us have them and have commented on them.

    There are two reasons I got the half-Boer doe. One is that the Kinder milk is too rich for my grandmother. She drinks 2% from the store, and Kinder milk starts at about 5.5% milkfat and goes up to well over 7%. I'm not sure how rich Opal's milk will be, but it shouldn't be quite that high in milkfat, so hopefully Grandma will be able to drink it.

    The other reason is that I want to do some goat packing, and the Kinders are a little small for that. I'll use them, but I'd like to have a few larger goats along, also.

    I'm really not into high-strung animals, so the phlegmatic Boer personality suits me just fine. The Kinders are sweet, not quite as laid back as the half-Boer doe, but very nice goats to have around. I wish I had more land (we have one acre here), as I think with some work and enough animals to be able to do thorough culling, a half-Boer dual-purpose goat could be developed, or triple purpose, really. Milk, meat, and packing or carting. If you started with really good dairy does, and selected good quality Boers, I don't think it would take too long to get something really nice, and very useful for the homesteader or small farmer.

    I only have the one half-Boer doe right now. I have five Kinders, three does, a buck, and a wether. I need more land, LOL!

    You should be able to find someone with Boers in your area, I would think. They are getting to be pretty common now, and the prices have come down from stratospheric to a more reasonable level.

    Kathleen
     
  6. BirdWoman

    BirdWoman Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Location:
    Nevada
    Thanks for the info. At our guest ranch we are going to start packing with the goats also. I have a couple of pack llamas now, but goats are much less likely to run off. My Obies will make nice pack goats, but a little Boer wouldn't hurt. I've just never been around Boers and don't know much about their personalities. That's important around here because my guests really enjoy the animals. I have a few Norwegian Fjord horses and Buff Orpington chickens, also chosen for their easy-going natures. The Obies fit right in. If I find a good Boer doe or two I might try some experimental breeding. All it takes is patience!
     
  7. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    If you do try some experimental breeding, keep us posted on how they turn out. Maybe someday I'll buy a half Boer and half Ober buck from you!

    Kathleen
     
  8. Xandras_Zoo

    Xandras_Zoo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    815
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Location:
    Richmond, BC, Canada
    Welcome! This place is wonderful... and it's too bad you're so far away from me 'cause those oberhasli goats are gorgeous