LOTS of Questions

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by trnubian, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. trnubian

    trnubian Twin-Reflection Nubians

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    I have been around beef cattle all of my life so I feel really stupid asking these questions even though they are questions about dairy cattle.

    So for all you dairy cattle people out there:

    1. Jerseys look all sweet and innocent, but is there an ornery streak hidden in those liquid brown eyes that I should know about?

    2. I don't like the looks of Brown Swiss but is there a redeeming quality about them that should override that?

    3. About how much milk will an average holstein give? What about a Jersey? I know the butterfat in the Jersey milk will be MUCH higher than in the holstein milk.

    4. What do they eat? I know that is a stupid question, but one I want to know about. We fed our dairy goats:
    alfalfa hay out the wazoo (in front of them 24/7),
    an 18% grain ration (that actually contained Pro Vider 38 -dairy cow pellet-),
    free choice baking soda (helps to neutralize stomach acid,
    and free choice goat minerals.
    Is that anywhere near what you would feed to a milking or growing calf? About how much of each?

    5. I don't have much in the way of pasture. Maybe 3/4 an acre. So there won't be much. But it is divided so that I can rotate between 2 sections.

    6. How much will a heifer calf cost me. Registerable. Nice conformation, good bloodlines (show and milk) as my younger brother might show it in 4-H.

    Ok that's it for now. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    1. YES lol
    but i wouldnt have it any other way... they are like the cat of the cow world, playful snuggly and somedays wont have none of ya

    2 dont know brown swiss
    3 holstien apx 12 gals a day jersey 2-5.5
    4. jerseys are also the goat of the cow world, they are a small island breed, and as such can live on scrub, actually produce more for the ammount of feed you give them compared to all other cows.(a holstien will make more but in porportion you have to feed them alot more to do it) we dont feed hay except in winter not tried baking soda, ours get about a 16-18 percent dairy mix, consisting of cracked corn oats soy and molassas. but only get grain when we are milking, i can usually finish milking before they are done eating.

    6. dont deal in registered, but from what ive seen 1500-2000 for bred havent ever seen an open heifer calf for sale.
     

  3. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Their is one at this site for 1,200 I have seen others on peoples web sites in OK for 1,200
    jim/se kansas Join Date: May 2002
    Posts: 128

    Bred Jersey heifer for sale

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Please viait web site to view pictures.
    verdigrisvalleyfarm.com
    Thanks, Jim
    __________________
    Verdigris Valley Farm
    Altoona, Kansas
     
  4. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    Swiss are triple purpose; good amount of milk / butterfat; lot's of beef; good draft animals. Plus they are calm and gentle (for the most part...can have ornery ones just like any other breed).
     
  5. trnubian

    trnubian Twin-Reflection Nubians

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    Sorry for getting back so late!

    Thanks for all the information!

    So no one has ever heard of a dairy selling heifer calves? Do they keep them ALL as replacements?
     
  6. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Do you think I could find a decent Brown Swiss in Texas?
     
  7. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've wondered about this very thing myself, as I'm in the market for a couple heifer calves, both beef and dairy breeds. Will post back when I find out if the local Jersey dairy parts with any of the heifer calves.
     
  8. NightHawk

    NightHawk Active Member

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    I've raised a few Jerseys, they are sweet. Their milk is about half and half, good if you like cream or make alot of butter. Only thing is after they calve, since their milk is so rich they sometimes can't get up for lack of calcium. But a shot of calcium will get them right up. Had one Swiss, meanest dang thing, but that was only one.
     
  9. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    A heifer from a dairy(provided that it's not a very small dairy:) ) will likely be afraid of you--which can be dangerous(our girl, although not from a dairy, was very afraid of us at first because she hadn't had much human contact in awhile). It took alot of blood, sweat, and tears to get her to be the kittycat she is now. I WOULDNOT go through that again! I contacted af ew dairys and they wanted to sell me 3/4 heifers....still for about 800-1000 dollars--not guaranteed bred, either...
     
  10. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Um, about the milk fever, that's a genetic thing that has nothing to do with the richness of the milk. Milk fever is caused by the parathyroid glands not being up to speed on Calcium transport/absorption. When the cow is dry, she doesn't need large amounts of Ca, so the parathyroids get used to this low level. When the cow bags up to freshen, the parathyroids are supposed to ramp up and get Ca transport all set. If this doesn't happen, the cow will simply start taking more Ca from the blood than she can stand, and this is milk fever. Which is why you don't milk fresh cows out all the way for at least a couple of milkings, to give the cow a chance to get the Ca issue settled and avoid milk fever.

    Jennifer