Lots and lots of baby bunnies (11)

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by CurtisWilliams, May 30, 2005.

  1. CurtisWilliams

    CurtisWilliams Well-Known Member

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    Finally, after a couple major set-backs, my rabbits decided to do what rabbits do best, and give me babies. Last week, my F.G. had 5 kits. This was after losing 4 kits a couple weeks before. Both mom and the little wigglers are doing fine. I have 2 brown babies and 3 solid white ones, Mama is steel grey, so I think Papa is my Californian. (They were all in together). Yesterday, I awoke to a new litter from my Dutch. It was the 31st day since mating, so it wasn't a big surprise. She had beed acting pregnant for a couple weeks now. She decided that she didn't like the nest box I gave her and had her 6 kits in her litter box. (of course, it had a few days of bunny stuff in it). I didn't want to handle the babies right away, so I didn't clean it 'til this morning. (Was this a mistake? Should I have cleaned it right away?) Everyone seems to be doing fine. I'm going to wait another week and put the F.G. in for breeding and a couple weeks for the Dutch.

    I know that young rabbits can't have greens for a few months, How about the succulent stems from plants? We have a wild plant around here, I dont know what it is. It has big green leaves, like a cross between dandelion and rhubarb, and celery like leaf stalks. My rabbit, chickens and ducks go crazy over it. Can I feed green stems to young rabbits? How about beets, squash, and other garden produce?
     
  2. SmokedCow

    SmokedCow Well-Known Member

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    Congrats! I remember when we use to have baby bunnies, I use to feed them in a chicken feeder...SOOO CUTE! They were Mini lop. I would wait till they are oldenough to handle it. They are just like human babies. Their tummies are very sensitive to outsiede sources outher then milk. But i thought u left the kits on mama for 8 weeks? If you breed ur FG next week, the kits will onlye be 2 weeks old. 28 days is only 3 weeks so ur looking at 5 weeks. Will they be ready in time? Wouldnt u like mama to get back into shape? Sorry. I'm use to big livestock were they get bread once a year. Best Of Luck!
    AJ
     

  3. slfisher

    slfisher Well-Known Member

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    The babies aren't supposed to have greens? Oops. How do I give mama greens withotu letting the babies have them?
     
  4. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    My babies always get greens as soon as they can nibble. I've never had trouble with diarrhea on them, except for the litter I waited on. They all got diarrhea with the first nibble. :no: when their diet got changed like that.

    Meg
     
  5. CurtisWilliams

    CurtisWilliams Well-Known Member

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    In Storey's Guide they say NO GREENS under any circumstances until the rabbits are 6 months old. No if's, ands or buts. If they eat so much as a nibble, they will get diareah and die!

    I wasn't impressed with this book. While it does have a lot of useful info, so much of it is filler and fluff. I think that the author had a word count requirement to fill, and put everything that came to mind in the book in order to fill it up.

    We live in the real world with real world rabbits. In the wild, baby bunnies eat greens from the moment they start to wean. I plan on giving my bunnies greens under controlled circumstances to see if they can handle then. We have tons of Dock, Dandelions andBroadleaf Plantain around here. I'd be foolish not to use this free food source.

    If you want to feed Mama greens without the bunnies getting them, simpley remove Mama or the babies at feeding time.
     
  6. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Not a bunny person here, but I do believe this is the key. In captivity, what a rabbit eats is subject to whatever it's human tosses in the cage. If someone isn't consistent with the greens, and puts a bunch in when babies are a few weeks old, then yes, they'll probably o.d. on them. Any animal will do that when the diet is changed abruptly. My guess is that if you continue to put a few greens in front of mamma every day, the babies will be fine.

    And congrats, btw, on the wee ones!
     
  7. kisota

    kisota Active Member

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    If you will go to the Feed Store and get some HORSE( I captilized so you wouldn't think I was kidding)Cubes that are Alfalfa (Pure) give them to your kits and Does and Bucks, they will be great and you don't have to take a chance with fresh Greens. Hope this helps.

    Kisota
     
  8. SmokedCow

    SmokedCow Well-Known Member

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    I agree they eat what we give them. And i have fed mine grass but only when they leanr to hop around and they were at the super cute stage! haha. Just make shur ir not wet grass cuz they can bloat on that. But still....isnt it to early to breed her when she will only be 3 and 5 weeks?? Hmm...
    AJ
     
  9. CurtisWilliams

    CurtisWilliams Well-Known Member

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    Conventional wisdom has it that given proper nutrition, a two week period between weaning and kindling is enough to maintain the does physical well being. In the wild, a doe may be rebred the same day as she gives birth. My rabbits are young and healthy, this was their first litter each. I am going with an accelerated breeding schedule while I can because in another month or two, I expect the heat to force a lull in my breeding. 100+ degrees and 100% humidity throws a damper on the males fertility.
     
  10. SmokedCow

    SmokedCow Well-Known Member

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    I knew heat brings down the males fertility but i didnt know it was 2 weeks! Wow...i learne somthing everyday! THANKS!!
    AJ
     
  11. slfisher

    slfisher Well-Known Member

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    Well, I put a head of lettuce in there the other day, and none of them are dead, so I guess they figured it out.

    But man, those little (*&)*&(* can eat. Normally I'd put in one scoop of pellets for the mom; the mom and ten babies can eat *four* scoops of pellets in a day.
     
  12. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    I would be careful with one green, and that is lettuce, esp. iceberg. It is nearly all water and no vitamins, other greens, even grass, would be much better. :) Lettuce just fills them up on empty calories.