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I was going to buy raspberry and blueberry bushes from a sale flyer which routinely comes in the local mail, but an article in the Post made me question the wisdom of this.
It suggested buying virus-free stock for raspberries.
Now we have wild raspberries all over, and I just wanted some in a more convenient spot. Do I really have to worry about viruses?

In addition, almost all of our berries are the sort which turn black - or dark anyway - these are black raspberries, right? Is it loganberries which produce later in the year?

Then my husband spotted some red raspberries, and let me tell you, they were so good I'm ready to comb the woods and start transplanting if that's what it takes to get more of those around here!

Thanks for helping a newbie!
Deb
 

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Hey, another Marylander--I'm on the cusp of DC but I know Damascus.

I've never had virus problems with raspberries although I've traded with gardeners and even bought from the Michigan places we all love to hate--my unnamed fig everybody covets starts from came from a "$3 bargain bag" page many years ago--"Blackie" was an unexpected treasure. What did the Post say? Poor service or ??? If the prices look good, I'd probably take a chance on a small order but that's me. I'd love to know what "flier" you mean; I only get catalogues in the mail. BTW, I've heard you shouldn't grow black and red together but I don't know if that's true.

Are you sure those are red raspberries? If growing wild they could be wineberries; they look very similiar but the plants are fuzzy and thornier. I've recently captured 3 WBs of which one is growing well; I potted them in leaf mulch and have them in the shade for now; figure on losing 2/3 of your new plants from stress.

katy
 

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We get a flyer - I don't remember if it comes in those mail ads or in the post coupon section, but it is the House of Wesley - "super jumbo blueberries" $5.95 each, etc.
I also receive the Four Seasons Nursery catalog.

The berries aren't fuzzy at all - wonderfully sweet and less seedy.
 

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LOL, Deb, I didn't mean the berries were fuzzy--just the stems--reddish stubble.

$5.95 doesn't sound like a great price unless you're talking 3 year old plants; you can spend about the same at HD, Lowes or a local nursery and not pay shipping. Check out the Gardenwatchdog Sticky tallpines posted; the comments there are from folks with experience from mailorder seed and plant sources. The places you mentioned wouldn't be my choice...nuff said.

katy
 

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All of my raspberries are transplants from wild canes. I see two advantages:

1. they're free - free is good, no better than good. If they die, I'm not out any money.
2. the canes are already acclimated to the area and the soil. They will do well with a little care and fertilizer.

One piece of advice...I used to dig out the canes and transplant bare rooted plants. This doesn't work very well. The canes die within a few days. Some will begin to grow again by the following season but even those take another year or two to establish. These days I dig out a 18" section of dirt around the cane and transplant the whole root ball. I dig a similiar size hole, add some rabbit droppings and water, then drop in the entire, intact root ball. I mulch around the newly planted canes with more rabbit droppings and some composted straw. The canes usually don't die from the move. Some have actually bore fruit the same year as the move. Spring & fall are the best time to do this.
 

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I've had good luck ordering from Indiana Berry Company. Healthy, vigorous plants that really took off. But ask local berry people what varieties do well in your area before ordering. Maybe go to a Farmer's Market to find some berry farmers. They'll know.
 

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Idahofarmergal said:
I've had good luck ordering from Indiana Berry Company. Healthy, vigorous plants that really took off. But ask local berry people what varieties do well in your area before ordering. Maybe go to a Farmer's Market to find some berry farmers. They'll know.
I suppose this is an etiquette question as much as anything, but is it rude to ask the folks down the road who run a pick-your-own place where they get their stock?
I actually hope to be in competition with them in about five years.

deb
 

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I ordered from Farmer Seed & Nursery http://www.cometobuy.com/farmerseed/ with pretty good luck, some of items didn't make it. Lost couple raspberries. They did send me replacements last week. Barefoot plants with leafs just budding out, about quarter inch. They took right off. Thinking of ordering more.

I seen this watchdog page. this spring http://gardenwatchdog.com/c/235/ And still gave them a try. Only complaint that the consumer services need to get it together. And shipping dates need to be addresses. Replacements had a two weeks arrival date.
About the green bag grumble on one of the posts, Yep it dose come all together and a little slimy As a farmer won't have it any other way. :cool:

Timber
 
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dla said:
I was going to buy raspberry and blueberry bushes from a sale flyer which routinely comes in the local mail, but an article in the Post made me question the wisdom of this.
It suggested buying virus-free stock for raspberries.
Now we have wild raspberries all over, and I just wanted some in a more convenient spot. Do I really have to worry about viruses?

***If you want at least an outline of an answer to the a from someone mostly a passer by in these forums (me) who happens to have been a small scale berry grower for market:
Unless you go to absolute top of the line of "virus-free" (thereare several "grades" of "virus free" such as: (from lesser to higher quality)

1."Grown from virus free stock" ( the parent stock from which the plants were propagated was tested for virus free-ness at "some point," probably within the last several years)

2."grown from virus free stock just one year removed from testing" (may be called "Certified" virus-free)

3. Tissue culture stock

(There may be other grades which do not come to mind right now. About virus grading, that is. Other grading ratings may exist, such as "#1" or "#2 " which in my experience usually means, respectively, one year old sized p;lants, and two year old plants.)

And yet, except possibly with tissue culture (TC) stock, there is not necessarily any ABSOLUTE certainty that the stock will be COMPLETELY free of viruses.
Is a small incidence of virus in a few plants apt to be HIGHLY harmful to a whole planting?
For RED rasberries, so long as your soil, conditions, and care are favorable to them, problems are apt to be limited at most. That is to say, in such circumstances the odds will TEND to be very very much in favor of success with them despite some possible virus presence, whether occurring (the virus) from a little presence in the stock ploanted, or originating from virus presence from lnearby wild raspberries (virus presence in wild rasps being pretty much inevitable).


With BLACK raspberries, though: virus impact tends to be much more devastating. Whilee it MAY be only a relatively small to modest proportion of black raspberry plants in a planting whom virus disease end up either sharply reduces production of--or devasting or killing-- on the other hand depending partly upon whether it's one of the more serious viruses or not, spreading of harsh disease can go to many many, or most all. the plants in a black raspberry planting.
For this reason, at least some level "virus free" stock, and preferably "Certified virus free" of some
sort, or even tissue culture, is about the only reasonably safe kind of black raspberry stock worth recommending for serious planting such as the commercial kind you say you're contemplating.

You'd also perhaps want to select (maybe by reading up and researching maybe or at least reading catalog descriptions thoroughly) for the most disease and virus-resistant varieties among the various bladck raspberry varieties offered--because of the presence of apparently considerable wild raspberries (whether red or black) on your property.
Actually if you have a "great deal" of wild raspberries nearby, that is relatively close nearby, at least for more than short term success, you might even be better off going completely or largely with some other kind of raspberry-- such as purple (also potentially at risk , but not at as much risk as black raspberries) or , for best prospects of all, red raspberries instead.




Then my husband spotted some red raspberries, and let me tell you, they were so good I'm ready to comb the woods and start transplanting if that's what it takes to get more of those around here!

***I've done a whole smal patch of raspberies transplanted from the wild--red type--and the results were at best mixed--the whole planting petered out, despite good care-- after maybe three years. The evidence overwhelmingly is that this wass is because of viruses wild raspberries tend to liberally contain.

Years later now, I am "toying" (on a hobby, fun scale) with the idea of trying to perhaps buck the principles a little, and try transplanting some wild black raspberries" Some picking I just did two days ago from just TWO wild black raspberry plants--during which I seem to half picked much less than half of the ripe berries present-- still added up to nearly three pints. Admittedly, for some reason these bushes' berries sem to be ripening all at once this year.

Yet, al this being said, in most all cases I have no doubt that buying fresh cultivated berry stock would be much beter advised and stand to be far far more productive.
For serious planting efforts like you mention, wild red raspberries in my view are not really the ticket, and neither I would very much tend to presume, would be wild black raspberries.

Incidentally, though the only decent sized patch of cultivated black raspberries I've ever heard of in my area, is reported going quite strong after 20 years now, black raspberry plantings , commercial ones at least, reportedly last (or remain thriving and efficient enough to retain) only a handful of years, 4 or 5 to 7 or 8 or something.
Red raspberry commercial plantings are know to go lots longer.
My original home red rasberry planting look strong after over 25 years.
My later market plantings vary so far,; the ones on soil that has proved a little too damp, started declining after about five years (about when weather patterns shifted to wetter every summer).
My red raspberry sections on better drained, good ground, are looking fully intact after ten years now.
The large proportion, well maybe 85 per cent, of my five year old purple raspberries (cross between reds and blacks) loook good, although the ones that were lost, WERE apparently lost to devasting disease, probably mostly virus; and the ones lost "went" out very fast when they were hit (with disease--probably mostly virus of one of more kinds.


Thanks for helping a newbie!

**You're welcome; I'm gratified to pass along information in case it might be helpful to new growers, especially those with farming-level interest.
(And now I might begin to feel more deserving of empathy or help, if I manage to get "brave" and ask on forums here, for answers I'm often so often scoutihng around for, to my Macintosh-related computer questions!) --Eric, guest here.
 
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1st of all. don't order from any of those companies from bloomington indianana. they sell crap and don't honor their guarentee. raspberries should be transplanted in the spring for good results. trying to do it now is failure in the making. i like raspberries and have traded alot of users of this forum and even sold some with mostly good results. they grow great east of kansas, but don't do well in the west. offer to trade someone that has some near you. i will have lots in the spring. but for yeild and space, thornless blackberries are the best bang for your buck. randy
 
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