Looking for New Homesteaders

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by chickflick, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Texas
    A friend requested I post this:


    Hi,

    My husband (age 21) and I (age 20) are looking for a young, like-minded couple
    who would like to buy about ten acres of land in Texas. Around certain
    areas, you can get 10 acres for about $20,000. I am hoping to have three or
    four couples on the land, thus splitting the cost 4 ways so that each couple
    need only to save $5K (Making it easier for remaining couples to buy their portion should they get fed up and leave).

    I would like to live completely without electricity, collecting rainwater, living in Tipis, huts or tree houses, making clothes out of sheep's wool and bathing with minimal water (I.E. a couple of buckets full heated over a fire and dumped into a small mettal tub big enough to sit in with your knees folded)... "If you can't, you can't stay". YES! I do want a phone line and a naturally generated radio for emergencies... I'm not
    COMPLETELY insane.

    Interested people, please contact ZenZeala2000@yahoo.com

    People of all universal faiths are welcome. No racists or "fag" haters,
    please. People with outdoorsey experience, plant/animal knowlege, interests
    in holistic healing, and alien abductees welcome! LOL
     

  2. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    I'm curious as to what the originating couple has for prior experience.

    For instance, have they ever lived completely without electricity, collecting rain water, ever lived in a tipi, hut or tree house, made clothing from sheep, or even sat in a tub with their knees folded.

    Do THEY have experience in the above, as well as outdoorsey experience, to include alien abduction?


    I can almost see this ad regarding someone or someones in their 40's advertising for such, but someone just out from their daddy's home?

    Post your credentials, and then ask for others.
     
  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hippies may not be obsolete after all.
     
  4. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    I don't recall noticing that they requested your OPINIONS or questions here. There is an email address. They are looking for Interested Parties, not critical old goats, like a lot of US!! LOL! :eek:
     
  5. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Texas - midway between Dallas and Tyler
    I hope you'll have your friend let us know how it goes. Is she planning on buying property in the northeast Texas area?
     
  6. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad you're vouching for your friend....I would have worried it was some older person trying to trap sex slaves! And I was going to volunteer! (just joking, of course).
     
  7. thanks for providing your OPINION oh wait a minute strike that no longer allowed on this thread
     
  8. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought, but they are talking about splitting ten acres between four families. That leaves two and a half acres per family. This would be plenty in areas with good precipitation, but the areas of Texas where I've seen land advertised for those prices appear to be pretty dry. You could *live* on 2 1/2 acres, but do all the things they want to do, including raise sheep (I'm assuming here, since they mention making their own clothing from wool)? Seems like they would need quite a bit more land for that. And, it always helps to have land with trees on it, for firewood, building materials, shade, and so on, and the areas I think they are looking at don't have trees.

    Kathleen in Oregon
     
  9. Hello,
    I always feel the need to respond to messages like yours at the idea was so close to my heart. I considered at long length doing just exactly what you intend, in a different location, but the same none the less. Over the last seven years (I was 19 when I chose to set out on this adventure) the idea has evolved and changed. The dream of a very small community of like minded individuals pursing the homestead life in a remote part of the world, living off the land, working together, hmmm. Then reality hit, I decided after long length that it would be highly unlikely to find others whom were equally committed and compatible. Many people kind of flaked out on the way. It takes serious dedication and real commitment. There was just this huge amount of uncertainty, what about the future, how long would everyone stay, could it be a lifetime commitment? I also was concerned about the reality of everything. Could I do it? For how long? Did I have the necessary skills? How could I learn them? For the rest of my life? Raise a family? What about health insurance? Liability insurance, I didn't want to lose my land, or portion, because of some one else's mistake? How much money would I need to get started and not find myself calling relatives? There are so many other complications it would take a while to list them. Anyway, I chose to purchase land myself in Alaska, where beautiful acreage could be bought for around $2K per acre, and am building a homestead there. If you are seriously committed to living a remote lifestyle and are not just having fun, feel free to email me. I would be happy to chat with you and offer some advice. If you look at our website you can see what we're up to.

    Wishing you the best of luck,
    Ryan Warren
    www.pawcreekhomestead.com
     
  10. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    centeral Okla. S of I-40, E of I-35
    Wow, 4 couples on 10 acres, and I cringe at the thought of having my grown son on our 60 acres.

    We live in the manner discribed no real problems or hardship with that, after 2 years I have up graded the tub to a 40 gallon oval black poly tub, talk about and NICE batheing experience, but sharing the square footage of ten acres, that I couldn't do.

    I wish you luck,
     
  11. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ........................I was ...Positive.....that I had posted a Response to this thread, and Now I Don't see it here! .....Am I wrong or...do we have gremlins loose in the server , .....fordy... :confused: :(
     
  12. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

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    Gremlins it is, or maybe some of the alien abduction referenced above.............
    My purpose is to not have neighbors rather than have them packing in from the git. But then I have been a loner for a long time. Like in the movie Jeremiah Johnson when Jeremiah had the entire Crow Nation coming at him one at a time and Del suggested maybe Jeremiah should go down to a town. Jeremiah calmly said "I've been to a town Del." I stood and cheered, both fists raised in the air, for I too have been to a town.
     
  13. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    Kathleen, I think that land out in the arid regions of west texas is substantially cheaper than 2 thousand dollars an acre. I live in an area that gets about 38 - 40 inches of precipitation a year and has plenty of trees and land can be had for that, although of course this is unimproved land and the farther you get away from Dallas the better your odds of finding it. I bought a ten acre lot for 8,000 dollars seven years ago (granted I got a particularly good deal I think).
     
  14. JulieNC

    JulieNC Well-Known Member

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    Great website, Ryan . . . it's exciting and inspiring to see a couple busy making their dreams happen. Thanks for sharing.
     
  15. WillowWisp

    WillowWisp Well-Known Member

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    If your friends actually go through and are able to do this, more power to them. I am still learning about what homesteading actually is, and wouldn't ever prefer living completely like that...but so much can be learned. I had even found a site where they sell real Tipis. Hope they find people willing to share their dream.
     
  16. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Location:
    River Valley, Arkansas
    I e-mailed your friend :

    Dennis G Brown wrote:
    May I suggest that you visit communes many times before making any commitment?

    10 Acres may sound like a lot but it is very small once buildings are put up and houses are built.

    Actually we have ten acres and it is not enough for us to do all the things we want to do. We raise our own food

    Land where we live is cheaper than $2000 an acre and thats near a town.

    Areas of Texas are not conducive to farm anything except grass.

    Most of all visit the communes. I did a google search for commune not communes and came up wit quit a few.

    Good luck and enjoy your search.


    His Response:
    I don't mean to be harsh (or do I?) but you are [edited for vulgarity - knock it off!]

    There is a homestead along the Brazos River where an ENTIRE community grows their own food, horses, hay, honey, herbs, etc. I've lived in Texas all my life and had many many gardens as my mom was into gardening since before I was born. East Texas (where I am looking) has some of the best peaches and blackberries around. Tyler is famous for its roses. There are entire orcherds and the black berries even grow wild. I've made pies and coblers several times just off of berries that grow on the fense near the horse pasture. The plants were uncared for, WILD plants that produced like mad.

    Houses and buldings??? I said huts and tipis, did I not? Four of those would take up less than an acre. Using a suncooker (which I know how to build for under 5 dollars) during warmer months would eliminate the need for fire wood until winter time.

    Sheep... 4-6 sheep living on an acer will be PLEANTY for wool. (I know because I used to spin and crochet - cause we never baught a loom...*sigh*) If the sheep look a little unhappy, we would simply let them out to graze and pen them up again at night. Two solid acres of garden (grown wisely) would be effecient. Yams are a GREAT crop, packed with most needed vitamens. Preservasion of root crops is simple and effective. So far I've only used 4 acres. THat leaves me with six to raise fish (although I'm a vegan so that's out), grow pine trees, maybe have a horse or two, a building for books and phone lines, etc, and whatever else.

    It only gets unworkable when the land is devided up like a neighborhood and everyone has their own garden. That's when things fail to work. If 8 people can't survive on 10 acres... then how does the world work? eh?

    My mom has about 12... Actually I spent most of my childhood on 2 acres. We did SOOOO much with that property and still... a LOT went to "waste". It can be done. Infact... people have written books about it.

    Last of all... Water. This is my ONLY concern. After reading The Issaiah Effect, I have successfully made it rain 34 times in England, Michigan, Boston, and Texas. My brother and his friends thought I was joking till I proved it a few times. Now they don't know what to think and neither do I. How can something be a coincidence THAT many times? Why does it ALWAYS work? Now, being a bit realistic... I can't count on that. Having a well dug is probably a good idea. I could also find something with a creek for a little more money. In either case, the water WILL need to be distilled. Distillers are EASY to make. You can get a LOT of water from the rain, but lining up BIG plastic drums under a sheet metal slope such as the "sheep shed" we will probably erect.

    OH! ANd live stock feed... THe chickens can be pretty happy from foraging and eating potato pealings and left overs. But if not... I haven't "banned" jobs or vehicals. Buying oats and medication for the sheep is probably a MUST.

    People always freak out when they find out I'm young. American indians could build their own tipis by age 10. They also pretty much knew how to survive. Now... I didn't have THAT upbringing... But my upbringing was WAY different that the majority. I've cleaned fish, butchered a duck, grown vegies, sewed, cooked, baby sat, ran a business (which I still do) all by age 16. I know what it's like to bleed, sweat, cry and hurt. I know what **** smells like. I've scooped maggot infested carcesses up out of the pasture/yard... I've shot a snake. I've shot a coyote. I know what I'm doing.

    Love, ZZ


    If this is his attitude he needs a lot of prayer or he needs to stop doing LSD. LOL
     
  17. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Ayup, but it'll be fun to read his book due out in 20 years.

    Titled "Everything I Thunk I Knowd"
     
  18. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    "I don't mean to be harsh (or do I?) but you are talking out of your ass."

    What an putrid bozo this guy is. With an attitude like that he should live the life of a hermit (no offense intended, John). I can't imagine anybody being able to put up with such a self centered rude individual.

    Since he has email, why doesn't he post here himself? I suspect that he feels he is 'above' this Internet thingy.
     
  19. sounds like he/she was raised with a refrigerator and a freezer too.

    is their goal to be totally self sufficient or just to live primative lives? they still don't have everything figured out. since they're in Texas where they're blessed with all of that sunlight why don't they get a solar power setup for that refrigerator they're going to want? I'm 18 and I think I could do 10x better at being self sufficient than them, the main thing you gotta realize is that mother nature is going to control you, not vice versa