Looking for an old recipe.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ardie/WI, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought that I'd try here.

    My cousin, Marie,79, and I were chatting on the phone about old recipes-those made by our grandmother and our mothers. She mentioned one that I vaguely remember that Grandma made with pork and prunes.

    Marie said that Grandma only made it when they were butchering pigs, which leads me to think she was using up scraps and odds and ends of the butchering. Does anyone have any idea what this recipe might have been?

    Grandma and Grandpa lived in Wisconsin, about 20 miles or so from Green Bay, were of Belgian descent and farmed.
     
  2. vickiesmom

    vickiesmom Well-Known Member

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    Could it be mince meat??
     

  3. grams

    grams fiber crone

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    Mincemeat was my thought also. I have never used prunes, but I do use plums.
     
  4. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This may be it, but it's not made with scraps. We had it at a Polish restaurant and it was really good!


    Pork Roast Stuffed with Apricots and Prunes Recipe courtesy Theo Weening, Whole Foods Market
    Show: Sara's Secrets
    Episode: Butcher's Basics


    1 whole center-cut boneless pork loin (about 4 to 5 pounds)
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    1 (6-ounce) jar apricot chutney
    1 (16-ounce) box dried apricots
    2 (16-ounce) boxes dried prunes
    Equipment: Butcher’s twine


    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    Clean pork loin removing any excess fat. butterfly the pork loin (1/2-inch thick). Lay the pork, cut-side up, season with salt and pepper, and rub liberally with the apricot chutney. Place a layer of apricots and prunes on the flattened loin. Roll tightly and tie with twine at 1/2-inch intervals.

    Place the pork in a roasting pan fitted with a rack and season with salt and pepper. Roast until the pork reaches an internal temperature of 145 to 150 degrees F, about 15 minutes per pound. Transfer the pork to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.
     
  5. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    I have a VERY old and much treasured cookbook from the 1950s (okay that seems very old to me...)

    It has a recipe for Cushion Style Pork Shoulder with Apple and Prune Stuffing.

    (It also has recipes for cooking squirrel and oppossum, and tells you how to wash out your milk bottles!)

    Anyway...

    Pork Shoulder (picnic)
    8-10 prunes
    3 tart apples
    2 tbsp butter
    1 c bread crumbs
    1/2 lemon rind, grated
    1/2 tsp brown sugar
    1/4 tsp cinnamon
    salt & pepper

    Have picnic shoulder boned and sew on 3 sides leaving 1 side open for stuffing. Cook prunes in water till tender, pit and cut into halves. Pare apples adn cut into wedges about 3/4 inch thick. Melt butter, add bread crumbs, prunes and apples. Sprinkle with lemon rind, brown sugar and cimmanom. Season pork shoulder with salt & pepper and fill opening with prune and apple stuffing. Place on rack in open roaster. Cook in moderate oven (350F) allowing 35-40 mins per pound. Serves 8.
     
  6. vickiesmom

    vickiesmom Well-Known Member

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    MMMMMM...that all sounds so good! Might try them for Thanksgiving.
     
  7. IMContrary

    IMContrary Well-Known Member

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    I've got an old cookbook from the late 1800's/early 1900's "The Everyday Cookbook", when I get home from work tonight I'll check it out. But chances are it was a regional or even familial recipe that probably isn't in a cookbook. It sounds kinda German or Eastern European to me, so you could try using some ethnic cookbooks.
     
  8. Calico Katie

    Calico Katie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like she may have been making scrapple and the prunes were her own addition or something from her family. This page has some scrapple recipes and some of them are made with fruit.
    http://www.berksweb.com/pam/scrapple.html
     
  9. blue gecko

    blue gecko Well-Known Member

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    From the Finnish Cookbook by Beatrice A. Ojakangas

    Prune-stuffed Pork Rolls Luumulihakaaryleet

    Thin slices of pork are wrapped around pitted prunes, browned well, and served with a creamy gravy made from the pan drippings. Add potatoes, pickles, and a salad for a delicious meal.

    1 1/2 pounds boneless pork cut into thin slices about 3 inches square
    1 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp white pepper
    1/2 pound pitted prunes
    butter
    water

    Gravy 2 tablespoons flour
    1/2 cup heavy cream
    salt
    pepper

    Sprinkle the meat slices with salt and pepper. Put 2 or 3 pitted prunes on each slice, roll up, and fasten with toothpicks or tie with string. Brown the rolls in the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add about 1 cup water (just enough to keep the bottom of the pan moist) cover, and simmer for 1 hour or until the meat is tender, adding more water if necessary.

    Remove the meat from the pan. Add enough water to scrape the brownings from the bottom of the pan. Combine the flour and cream, and stir into the liquid in the pan to make a smooth gravy. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook until the gravy is thickened. Pour over the meat rolls and serve hot. Serves about 4
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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  11. patnewmex

    patnewmex Jane of all trades

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    I love Bea Ojakangas stuff. I used to work with her brother, Leonard.

    Pat
     
  12. blue gecko

    blue gecko Well-Known Member

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    Small World! Bea's cookbook has all sorts of lovely recipes. B