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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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I found this paragraph on the website of a woman who is a microbiologist researcher with Nubian goats. Have any of your managed your milkers this way?

"I breed my does to kid the first time as two year olds, then I milk them through for 16 to 18 months, let them rest, then breed them again to kid as 4 year olds. This way I have year-round milk, but not too many kids."

http://www.imagecyte.com/mygoats.html
 

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Pook's Hollow
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I suppose it would work if your goats would milk through for that length of time. I was rather under the impression that most don't. My NubianX did well to milk for 8 months during her first lactation - we'll see how she does this time around. My big Saanen, on the other hand, would very likely milk for that long. She's very hard to dry off to give her two months break before kidding.
 

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why hide it?
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My LaManchas are very difficult to dry off and probably would milk through to the second year, but kids are a product for sale or for the freezer. It seems like alot of the time, with this particular breeder quoted, her goats are probably producing tiny quantities of milk or are loafing. If they are on browse mainly, then I guess the breeder is not incurring too many extra costs doing things this way. Hers may be mostly pets and to each their own.
 

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Here's the first paragraph, too. Looks like she's getting enough to make cheese.

I have been raising Nubian goats since 1995 starting with two does from the Jerley Farm line. I've never had an interest in showing so I never registered any of the goats, I've just enjoyed fresh milk and cheese, healthy chevon and gained a lot of experience in raising livestock.
 

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If you get a good quality doe from a line that has long lactations, you can do that. You can do it for longer than 18 months. Of course, they have to be fed well and cared for; grass pasture with no hay or grain won't sustain that kind of production.

A lot of goats aren't bred to milk. If you want to do this, then get one that is and who has records in the family to prove it. A big udder or high production doesn't necessarily indicate this sort of potential, because there are those who will peak at 2 gallons and dry up by mid fall, while others will produce a steady 3 quarts a day right through the winter. You want a doe with a long level lactation curve.
 

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Cool! Thank you!
 

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I recently bought a Nubian and a NubianX, right after the kids were weaned. The Nubian gives me 2+ quarts a day, and the X about 2 quarts, and this amount is perfect for me. They are 4 months into their lactation. I had hoped to milk as long as possible before breeding them as I do not want kids (I have too many pet goats already :rolleyes: ). So regardless of my consistant milking, they could dry up soon? That's not good.
 

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I'm not saying that you can't milk those does through- you might be able to. I will say that their current production of 2 qts a day doesn't sound terribly promising...but like I said, I had a doe who only gave about 3 qts a day but she was reliable, and so were her daughters. They all kept milking long after the other does dried off.

My recommendation for people who don't have goats yet or aren't up to their necks in goats already is to buy from Redwood Hills or some similarly good place. The Sunshine Herd (Daniel Considine) is probably another good choice, though too far away from me. These herds that are also dairies, with owners that are judges and who show, do DNA testing, serious disease control and prevention, don't have any use for pets that are cutesy. The animals have to milk, they have to milk reliably for a long time, and they have to do it without a lot of frou-frou care. Honestly, I would rather buy just one or two goats from RWH than to take a thousand freebies. They multiply quickly and before ya know it, you have a herd. Might as well get really good ones that will actually serve their purpose.....
 

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The below is an edited version of something I posted in another thread not too long ago, but it is worth repeating in a thread specifically about milking through:

When I researched milking through, I came across a lot of the same comments that appear here. Basically, most folks claimed that it was the rare doe who would milk through. However, then I met someone who I bought a doeling off of who says that she milks through all the time. So, this year I tried it.

My doe is now fourteen months fresh and producing about four to five pounds a day (half a gallon), milking twice a day. Until about three weeks ago, I was milking her once a day, which I had been doing since she freshened. For the first few months I got about four pounds a day while her kids got the rest. I continued to milk once a day after weaning and continued to get about four pounds a day. Over the winter, she dropped down to about two pounds, where she stayed until three weeks ago. Three weeks ago, I started milking twice a day to have milk in the morning and evening to give to a sick pig. Basically overnight, her production doubled to between four and five pounds. I was shocked, as I wasn't sure that I would get more than a few squirts at the second milking on the first day of twice a day milking, but there it was.

This doe is an okay milker, definitely not anything special. Her previous lactation, when she was a first-freshener, I milked her twice a day for about eight months when I dried her up. She gave about seven pounds a day for a few months and then fluctuated between five and six pounds for the rest of the time, sometimes going as low as four pounds.

I should also mention that she is getting 1.5lbs of an organic 16% complete goat feed per milking (3 lbs total), free choice mixed grass hay, free choice browse, and free choice minerals. This has kept her in good condition.

I think many more does are capable of milking through than is commonly believed. The only way to find out if your doe/s will milk through is to try it.
 

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Um, your doe is special, hang onto her! For one thing 7# a day as a yearling? That's special. And then if you're getting half a gallon with her kids nursing for her second lactation, that's nothing to scoff at either.

Look around this place, I think you will be surprised. Quite a few folks here are tickled pink if their mature doe gives them 2-3 quarts (4-6#).

Secondly and very importantly, you were smart enough to get your doe from someone who was milking her does through, so your doeling had that genetic potential. I assure you, not all does will milk for 12 months, let alone 18 or 24. It sounds to me like you have a winner! :)
 

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chamoisee said:
Um, your doe is special, hang onto her! For one thing 7# a day as a yearling? That's special. And then if you're getting half a gallon with her kids nursing for her second lactation, that's nothing to scoff at either.

Look around this place, I think you will be surprised. Quite a few folks here are tickled pink if their mature doe gives them 2-3 quarts (4-6#).

Secondly and very importantly, you were smart enough to get your doe from someone who was milking her does through, so your doeling had that genetic potential. I assure you, not all does will milk for 12 months, let alone 18 or 24. It sounds to me like you have a winner! :)
Well, I'm glad to hear that you think that she is a good producer. I didn't think that special kicked in until around nine or ten pounds. She is a purebred Saanen (actually a Sable), and I thought seven pounds for the first few months of a lactation, even in a yearling, was pretty average for that breed. She also has a great disposition, sweet, gentle, and calm.

I just wanted to add that this doe is not the one that I got from the woman who milks through. The doeling that comes from that woman will be bred for the first time this year. The doe that I am currently milking through comes from a herd that is milked for ten months and then dried off. Nevertheless, she does have good genetics, so maybe that predisposed her to milking through.

Bob
 

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Hey Rebekah -- Redwood Hills were the only herd that REALLY caught my eye at nationals this year :) In fact, caught it well enough that I spent over $300 on 8 straws of semen <ouch!> Good thing I sold goats right before I went, lol.

My girls are terrible to dry off -- they'd easily milk through if I wanted to torture myself milking all winter ;-) My doe Agatha's last official milk test after 305 days of milking and 3 months bred was still 10#!
We just did a verification test yesterday, and Agatha's total for 3 milkings was 30.2#!

There are actually quite a few herds who have does that milk through -- Redwood Hills is one of them. I know Nodaway Alpines also frequently milks their does through too.

I would think for most of us though, we want those kids to sell/eat! I can freeze enough milk for our family to get us through the winter without having to milk through.....being out milking at -30F isn't a whole lotta fun. As a matter of fact, if milk is going to start hitting $5 a gallon like they say, I need to freeze a lot!

Tracy
 

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Pretty much what Tracey said...I can freeze enough milk to give myself some time off and not have to milk through the winter. Here, it is actually more pleasant to milk in the winter than the summer, but I want time off during Thanksgiving and Christmas to think of other things like baking and making ready for friends and family. I want the does to freshen right after New yeArs to start the cycle again. I do have one that I may not breed as she needs scurs removed and i don't want her pregnant this winter...so i may as well just milk her....she is a FF LM and at 5 months fresh is giving 4 lbs a day with 1 x a day milkings... she is always bursting so I think she will just keep on going....it will be fun to find out.
 
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