Log building books and techniques ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Zack, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Zack

    Zack Well-Known Member

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    We seem to have quite a few people with experience in log building here. What books would you suggest on the subject, What is your preferred building technique? Any good info on the net ?
     
  2. affenpinschermom

    affenpinschermom Well-Known Member

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    If you have never built with log before, a simple method is the d log. It is milled on three sides. It can easily be done with one or two people and goes up fairly fast with good results. I have lived in log homes for over 20 years now and I prefer this method for many reasons, the main one being it is easier to keep clean inside. You have a flush wall inside that is not collecting dust. There are many good books and lots of information on the net. Good luck. If you get a chance, watch someone else for a day or offer your help. Jean from Ky.
     

  3. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    I have built full scribe, full log chink, D logs (milled flat on 3 sides) and vertical log homes.

    Personally, I believe the vertical log home is best suited to the owner/builder with the D log style close behind. The 8' length of vertical logs and the simplicity of material handling is by far the biggest reason why owner/builders may wish to consider the method. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    Full scribe and full log chink are typically thought of as the "top of the line" log structures. Full scribe is by far the most labor intensive.
    2 names in these fields are regarded as the gurus, B Alan Mackie and Robert Chambers. Nearly anything written by either of these men will be extremely helpful & informative. As far as I'm concerned, the log home building industry has Mackie & Chambers.......and then everyone else. They are undoubtedly in a category of there own.

    Full scribe and full log chink homes are not very well suited to the owner/builder, mainly because few owner/builders possess a crane, or some machinery suitable of lifting 50' logs on a repeated basis.


    I'm of the opinion that the best instructional book written by the very best individual on the subject, will never come close to covering all aspects of construction and all the logistics of log home building.

    There is lots of info on the web regarding log home building. For more info on the vertical log building style visit http://www.vertical-log-courses-homes.net/buildings.html Rob Varey is one of the few log home building contractors that undertake the vertical log construction method.

    Several authors have written on D log construction.
     
  4. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    I have some "Log Home Living" magazines that I found Invaluable when we were building our log home for ideas.
    If you are interested in them, I would sell them. I'd have to look up what years they were I'm thinking around 97-2000. I have lots of them so they cover many subjects and they are in good condition. I could ship them book rate, what ever that is these days? LOL I also have some Log Home Design and Log Home Illustrated magazines all from the same years. Let me know if you are interested.

    Carol K
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............What about building a vertical log home with D logs and drilling a 3/4 inch hole at 2 feet and another at 6 feet , horizontially thru All logs and running a steel rod thru them that would be threadded on each end and then pulling them together , and as they age you could keep them all screwed together. I was just wondering if anybody has ever tried this, and I suppose it would work for horizontial logs as well..........fordy..... :)
     
  6. Zack

    Zack Well-Known Member

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    Tx / Ms zone 8A
    Thanks for the help.
    I’m not really considering building a house at this point, more than likely it will be a few out buildings.
    I need to clear some fence lines and thin a couple of lots but pulp prices in my area stink so I thought why not put those smaller trees to a more productive use .
     
  7. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    What are the best sources on "How to" information for vertical log building and other "simple" forms of log homes?
    I would like to start with books, but would like to hear all the options on learning how to build a log home including hands on classes. I have never done anything like this before so I am afraid I need to start with the basics first and work my way up to the complex.
    Thanks in advance. :D
     
  8. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    I don't know of any book in print regarding the vertical log building method.
    1000's of books are in print regarding horizontal log building methods.


    Hands on log building classes generally instruct people in the full scribe method of building. Most of these courses are a minimum of 4 weeks and may cost thousands of dollars.
    One guy in west coast (Oregon or Washington) offers a 2 day course in his version of the butt & pass log building method. Cost is $800. Personally, I think the guy is a crook and remain unconvinced that a 2 day course is adequate preparation in building a log home.......given all the complexities.

    Running the 3/4 threaded rod through vertical logs is not feasible. Doable yes, but certainly not feasible. It is far easier and less expensive to countersink the logs and then use some 8" ringshank pole barn nails to attach the logs together.
    Threaded rod is commonly used on horizontal log building methods, when it is far more practical. The threaded rod goes through the length of the wall and comes down under the first log where periodic adjustments can be accessed between the floor joists.