Homesteading Forum banner

81 - 100 of 108 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Second hand experience. As I explained earlier in the thread, my uncle kept my grandmother in their home (he was a dairy farmer) with the help of home health aides (Medicare, a county agency, and later Medicaid) until she deteriorated to the point where she went to a specialized care facility. He lost part of the family farm to pay for what Medicaid paid out for her care.

You have personal experience with Medicaid, I believe? I think I read that in one thread or another. Does your experience differ?
I would say you were fortunate that things worked out as they did. Your uncle was apparently in a position where he was able to accept another person into the home, and the additional costs involved were covered.

When my wife's grandfather was in need of care, her mother took him in, but not everything was covered. Fortunately, she used to be a nurse so was able to handle some of it herself. That's not always an option for everyone. So yes, my experience differs. Again, we were fortunate to be in a position where we were able to take him in.

My first-hand experience with "the system" has often been a nightmare. From them constantly changing my daughter's doctors, to the denials of service, and the times where she was removed from SSI without us even being notified - times where I have had to solicit my congressman for help - I have to constantly stay on top of it. Again, I am fortunate that I have a job where I can take time to handle stuff like that on the regular basis that I must. In fact, I have another one of those matters to attend to next week because of a paperwork screwup on their end.

Again, if a person wants their alert and oriented person in their home and out of a nursing home, it can be done.
That single mother is someone who lived in my apartment building. Her having to take in a parent was, thankfully, not something she actually had to deal with. But I used the example because there simply was no possible way for her to bear the costs, not just financial, but emotional and to her time (there are costs beyond just money).

At that time, living in that ghetto, I wouldn't have been able to do it either, not matter how much I wanted to. Today I am in a much better place, and can (and am) doing what I can for a family member.

You have personally seen things work out. That's not always the case. Don't extrapolate from your personal experience to everyone's. Please, try to have a little bit of sympathy and understanding for people who are not as well off and don't have the options you have had. You're making a blanket statement that simply does not always hold true. I'm just asking you to remember those whose life circumstances don't offer them any choices, or at least no viable ones, on such matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,010 Posts
Second hand experience. As I explained earlier in the thread, my uncle kept my grandmother in their home (he was a dairy farmer) with the help of home health aides (Medicare, a county agency, and later Medicaid) until she deteriorated to the point where she went to a specialized care facility. He lost part of the family farm to pay for what Medicaid paid out for her care.

You have personal experience with Medicaid, I believe? I think I read that in one thread or another. Does your experience differ?
I have personal experience. Yes, its completely different.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
30,992 Posts
I would say you were fortunate that things worked out as they did. Your uncle was apparently in a position where he was able to accept another person into the home, and the additional costs involved were covered.

When my wife's grandfather was in need of care, her mother took him in, but not everything was covered. Fortunately, she used to be a nurse so was able to handle some of it herself. That's not always an option for everyone. So yes, my experience differs. Again, we were fortunate to be in a position where we were able to take him in.

My first-hand experience with "the system" has often been a nightmare. From them constantly changing my daughter's doctors, to the denials of service, and the times where she was removed from SSI without us even being notified - times where I have had to solicit my congressman for help - I have to constantly stay on top of it. Again, I am fortunate that I have a job where I can take time to handle stuff like that on the regular basis that I must. In fact, I have another one of those matters to attend to next week because of a paperwork screwup on their end.


That single mother is someone who lived in my apartment building. Her having to take in a parent was, thankfully, not something she actually had to deal with. But I used the example because there simply was no possible way for her to bear the costs, not just financial, but emotional and to her time (there are costs beyond just money).

At that time, living in that ghetto, I wouldn't have been able to do it either, not matter how much I wanted to. Today I am in a much better place, and can (and am) doing what I can for a family member.

You have personally seen things work out. That's not always the case. Don't extrapolate from your personal experience to everyone's. Please, try to have a little bit of sympathy and understanding for people who are not as well off and don't have the options you have had. You're making a blanket statement that simply does not always hold true. I'm just asking you to remember those whose life circumstances don't offer them any choices, or at least no viable ones, on such matters.
My uncle, if you had read the thread or my prior post, kept my grandmother in their home, the family dairy farm. He never married, it was just the two of them, living on the milk and calf sales of a 40 (at most) head operation, timber sales, and a gravel pit. You can understand this wasn't the lap of luxury, correct? Sometimes life circumstances don't offer many choices, you are correct. He did it, with the help of home health aides for several years, because he'd always told her he would. Perhaps you shouldn't assume so much.

I had small children, a full time job, and lived 4+ hours away and did what I could, which usually amounted to paying his electric and phone bill so I could get hold of them. It was all he'd let me do.

You asked if I had personal experience, yes. I also know of others that have done the same thing, and I know of one family right now in the process of removing an alert and oriented family member from a nursing home. They are not as economical challenged as my uncle and grandmother, but they're doing it during a pandemic.

I stand by this- if you (collective you) want your family member at home, it can be done.
 

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,696 Posts
Again, if a person wants their alert and oriented person in their home and out of a nursing home, it can be done.
So you keep saying.

Second hand experience.
I had small children, a full time job, and lived 4+ hours away and did what I could, which usually amounted to paying his electric and phone bill so I could get hold of them. It was all he'd let me do.
Social services would have paid those bills if they qualified for help.

You asked if I had personal experience, yes. I also know of others that have done the same thing, and I know of one family right now in the process of removing an alert and oriented family member from a nursing home. They are not as economical challenged as my uncle and grandmother, but they're doing it during a pandemic.
More anecdotes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,948 Posts
If masks, hand washing, sanitization and lockdown measures worked, covid would not have spread through nursing homes like wildfire.

If masks, hand washing and sanitization kept covid from spreading there was no reason to keep the family (restricted to one or two support people) from visiting.

My mother in law was in a nursing facility before covid hit. Her caretaker had to fight with doctors and the hospital to get her out of the facility. It took 2 weeks. During the time she was in the facility her care would have been neglected if someone was not with her. I saw how other patients were neglected with no one responding to nurse calls.

During the time she was there, little to no measures were implemented to prevent the spread of disease despite it being the height of the flu season.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
30,992 Posts
If masks, hand washing, sanitization and lockdown measures worked, covid would not have spread through nursing homes like wildfire.

If masks, hand washing and sanitization kept covid from spreading there was no reason to keep the family (restricted to one or two support people) from visiting.
The problem was in the beginning of the pandemic, March and early April in NY. There weren't masks and lock down back then, it took deaths and some time to realize that we were fed a load of BS about how infectious Covid can be. We're just finding out now that it was known in February that Covid was going to be a big issue.

This is just my opinion, and I'm sure we're going to have to agree to disagree.
 

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,696 Posts

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,696 Posts
Thank you for proving my points.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,948 Posts
The problem was in the beginning of the pandemic, March and early April in NY. There weren't masks and lock down back then, it took deaths and some time to realize that we were fed a load of BS about how infectious Covid can be. We're just finding out now that it was known in February that Covid was going to be a big issue.

This is just my opinion, and I'm sure we're going to have to agree to disagree.
The ones here happened after the lock-down. Just recently a nursing home near my mom has been overrun with covid. I know all of New York was hit hard and fast. But in many states it is just now spreading rapidly. Nursing homes still in lock down mode with no visitors but the virus has run rampant. Newark, Ohio had a nursing home where many residents died in July and early August. In Ohio the majority of the covid deaths were nursing home residents.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
30,992 Posts
The ones here happened after the lock-down. Just recently a nursing home near my mom has been overrun with covid. I know all of New York was hit hard and fast. But in many states it is just now spreading rapidly. Nursing homes still in lock down mode with no visitors but the virus has run rampant. Newark, Ohio had a nursing home where many residents died in July and early August. In Ohio the majority of the covid deaths were nursing home residents.
I'm not familiar with what happened anywhere but New York. It sounds to me like guidelines weren't being followed, or were just relaxed. It's terrible that it happened.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,948 Posts
It is happening all across my state. Yes, most guidelines and protocols were ignored. Ohio is too lax on nursing home oversight. Even before covid, disease and infections were problems in nursing homes. So was neglect and abuse.I can only imagine that it is worse now without family members being involved
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,925 Posts
It is happening all across my state. Yes, most guidelines and protocols were ignored. Ohio is too lax on nursing home oversight. Even before covid, disease and infections were problems in nursing homes. So was neglect and abuse.I can only imagine that it is worse now without family members being involved
We have had a few also here in town. It is odd that some are bad and most are not. That cant be coincidence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
My uncle, if you had read the thread or my prior post, kept my grandmother in their home, the family dairy farm. He never married, it was just the two of them, living on the milk and calf sales of a 40 (at most) head operation, timber sales, and a gravel pit. You can understand this wasn't the lap of luxury, correct? Sometimes life circumstances don't offer many choices, you are correct. He did it, with the help of home health aides for several years, because he'd always told her he would. Perhaps you shouldn't assume so much.
Well, I was assuming that he had a home where he could take her in, and that's about it. Never assumed "lap of luxury". It's still a different circumstance.

I stand by this- if you (collective you) want your family member at home, it can be done.
For many, perhaps. For all, no.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,228 Posts
The ones here happened after the lock-down. Just recently a nursing home near my mom has been overrun with covid. I know all of New York was hit hard and fast. But in many states it is just now spreading rapidly. Nursing homes still in lock down mode with no visitors but the virus has run rampant. Newark, Ohio had a nursing home where many residents died in July and early August. In Ohio the majority of the covid deaths were nursing home residents.
I don't know why people think it won't happen. It's not like those in nursing homes have some magic shield that keeps them safe.

Aside from direct unit staff (RN's, RNA's and Aids), patients are seen by doctors, physio therapists, occupational therapists, geriatric assessment people, facility doctors, personal doctors, denturists, dentists. Also from the outside world is unit clerks, office staff, cleaning and laundry staff and food preparation staff, servers, etc.

In order to believe that people in nursing homes are safer locked away from family, we also have to assume that all those people mentioned are also self isolating and not in contact with anyone who may be infected.

I see many staff shopping as well, hear conversations about weekend camping trips and family reunions, know that some of the part time staff also work at Walmart, drive cab or work at the local tavern for extra income.

I still can't grasp the idea that a large group are safe to access patients and family members are not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
I haven't been following this thread, so forgive me if this has been mentioned before: NHs are not hospitals. They are neither constructed physically nor equipped nor logistically able to provide the necessary isolation for a wide spread, air borne infectious disease like CoViD.

Secondly, let it be known that the average Length of Stay (life expectancy, if you will) of a new NH admission is only 5 months (that's median stay; mean is a little longer because there are the less common cases where a resident stays alive there for a couple years.)...Statistically speaking: CoViD has not increased the death rate among NH pts-- They were doomed to die soon anyway. When things are totaled up after one year, you will see that there will have been no excess deaths in the NHs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
The figures posted by the OP assume that it is better to let the virus go, kill all the old and weak, let it expand exponentially so that those young and strong can go on with their lives unhampered. If you are talking wild animals, that is what happens, but if you are talking cattle any rancher would vaccinate, isolate, do anything he could to save his herd. No one, anywhere, had any idea how to face this pandemic. Perhaps next time we will let the chips fall where they may.
 
81 - 100 of 108 Posts
Top