loading goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by fishhead, Sep 19, 2006.

  1. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    On Thursday I have to load 10 wethers into the back of my Ford Ranger pickup (with topper). Six are bottle raised and no problem but four are "wild" and don't like to be touched. Except for the four wild ones I'm sad to see them go.

    I don't have any kind of loading chute and the only fencing is electric so there is nothing to crowd them against or into.

    I have this vision of goats jumping out of the topper as fast as I put others in.

    Anybody got some suggestions? Bribing with grain maybe?
     
  2. bachelorb

    bachelorb Well-Known Member

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    ohhh hoh you are in for some fun thursday. You might try an old blanket hung from the topper. The goats might think its a wall and not come back out towards you, and you can easily put them in. As for doing it without a catch pen....

    Do you have an old dog pen you could put grain in to get to them and carry them to the shell. My only other thing is to maybe fashion some type of shepards crook where you could grab them by the leg until you get to them to carry.

    Good Luck
     

  3. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the idea. I wouldn't have thought of a blanket wall.

    My plan thus far is to bribe them into the truck and try to catch the stragglers. Once I get the wild ones in the rest will be easy. The trick will be to keep them in as I load the rest.
     
  4. bachelorb

    bachelorb Well-Known Member

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    When I first started, I did the topper thing and ended upcarrying one by one to the topper and raising the glass. It took forever. I've had a catchpen every year since.
    Good Luck
     
  5. Rowdy

    Rowdy Well-Known Member

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    I have one goat who was given to me, and does not like to be messed with. At first I could rope her, but now she is too quick, and I've never been the best with a rope.

    After she learned to outrun me, I start this: take a long rope, make a loop, put said loop on the ground, pour some grain in the center of the loop, and set with the other end of the rope, waiting for the goat to be tempted. Once she is eating, and has a foot inside the loop, pull hard and snare the leg. I was always scared she would jump wrong and break her leg, so this was not my favorite method. It worked though.

    Now I have a catch pen made from cow panel. I bait it with grain, and once she goes it, I go in and get her.

    If she doesn't throw doubles, or have a really good looking kid, she'll probably end up on the bbq pit early next year. I'm finding that I do not like extremes. I do not want my goats too wild to work, but I don't want them under my feet all the time either. I have one of the former, and two of the latter, and the rest are a nice balance between.
     
  6. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Two cheap livestock panels that slide by one another to "close" the hole that you toss the kids through. I use that method and it works well. One person needs to be the gatekeeper though.
     
  7. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Definitely if I am to keep goats I will need to build a handling facility of some sort next season for worming, trimming hooves and immunization shots. The boys are headed home and then to freezer camp and the 3 or 4 I'm keeping are headed to their winter home till spring in a couple of weeks.
     
  8. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I park my truck in the pen (actually, at the gate), put a ramp that I made out of wood with slats spaced for footholds onto down tailgate and feed them in there for a few times, without trying to close the tailgate or even going near the truck at all. The bottle babies will climb right on and the wild ones who want the grain will follow soon enough. They will all just jump in on their own by the time you need to go.

    Food... a powerful motivator.
     
  9. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the idea. I do have a couple of nights left. Now I'm wondering how I will get the 3 who are staying out of the truck without letting them all out or someone driving their horns through a window. I may have to tie they up where they can't see the truck.
     
  10. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    Have you started feeding them in the truck yet?

    If they get used to jumping in there to eat today and tomorrow, Thursday should be rather easy.

    Lynda
     
  11. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I put the topper on and left the tailgate down. Naturally the 4 wild ones jumped in since they are more adventurous. Later after browsing I tossed a handful of corn in and had 6 or 7 in the truck at once but unfortunately 3 were mine. I don't know how I would ever be able to get mine out without letting everyone else out too.

    I'll do it again tomorrow night and Thursday I have an experienced goat raiser coming to help so between us we'll get them loaded.

    It looks like I'll be bringing a goat back with me on the return trip. His name is Roger and he's a 3 month old bottle baby so it should be good entertainment the rest of the fall.
     
  12. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    If the three you are keeping are bottle babies and calmer, can you lead them and put them in the garage or kitchen for a few minutes while you load the wild ones?

    Or do you have kids who could hold them on a leash?

    Lynda
     
  13. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    Actually, locking those three away the night before (in a stall or garage)would be more ideal so there won't be more confusion and unnecessary running around. Once one starts running (usually for no reason) all the others follow. Don't wait until right before you are loading.
     
  14. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Unfortunately I have no buildings on the farm. I think we will manage as long as I can get the wild ones loaded and they seem to be ready to jump in the back of the truck. The rest can be picked up and loaded one at a time if necessary.