Llamas

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by GrannyG, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    Okay, guys, need your help ! What do you feed llamas and what is the best way to try to gentle them down? Our friend, Bob, bought sheep, all the lady had, and in the deal he got a llama. DH has always wanted one (why?) and saw him downtown. Bob said the llama had protected the sheep, but he had dogs and the dogs were chasing it all over, and his horses were scared to death of it....so....you guessed it. Got a phone call this morning, and 30 minutes later, we have a llama. It is a castrated male, beautiful animal, white with black patches on each side of it's face and a black mustache. Of course, my goats are scared and run area to area and the roosters keep crowing. He told us it likes men, but not women. LOL. I went out and fed awhile ago, and he would walk slowly around me, stare me down, but not try to come to me. He is going all over sniffing and looking. I did not realize they were so tall. I will give him a great home, just think it will take coaxing and love, and Obama and I will get along fine. Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Ford8N

    Ford8N Well-Known Member

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    Rent the movie Napoleon Dynamite: He feeds his llama ham. :baby04: That is my daughter's favorite movie.

    I know that isn't helpful but I couldn't resist.
     

  3. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    You might try crossposting in the sheep forum - many people use them as guardians (as you know already) and someone there may have more info for you.

    :)
     
  4. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

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    Did you really say Obama? That is priceless
     
  5. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    Yes, at first I thought it was a female, and was going to call her Omama, but then it was a male, so I now own Obama. LOL.
     
  6. cayenne47

    cayenne47 Critter Mama Supporter

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    We feed our guy hay/alfalfa mix every day, he forages in his pasture and purina makes a llama chow LOL. He gets that like once a week.
    First thing he did was chase the goats...now they are scared to death of him. Think of 10 little goats TRYING to hide behind you and peeking around your legs LOLOLOL.
     
  7. RipVanArkie

    RipVanArkie The Rusty Ewe

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    They are foragers. Feed it as you do the sheep. If he hasn't spit at you yet I would say you have a good chance of getting aquainted. His opposition to women may be a result of a woman castrating him, I would feel the same if it were me.
     
  8. Jack_IA

    Jack_IA Active Member

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    we feed ours the same mix we feed the goats,horses etc.We get it mixed up sorta like sweet 16 but there is a horse or a llama ingredient that has a bad effect on one or the other do not remember what ingredient it is might be selenium (sp).
    We have quite a few llamas and horses an dgoats and they all get along just fine after a few days of getting use to each other.
    The paints we have love to chase them every so often.
     
  9. Jack_IA

    Jack_IA Active Member

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    alfalfa is too rich for them. we just give them a grass hay.same as the others.
     
  10. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Ours get good grass hay and seem happy and content with that.

    I go out there with a cut up apple or carrots and let them come up to me for treats and nosing. When I get into the pasture they'll come up and nose around me if I stand quietly and talk to them.

    The goats will adjust - mine still don't like the llamas, but they're not afraid of them anymore.
     
  11. Ford8N

    Ford8N Well-Known Member

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    Or perhaps Osama....
     
  12. Ninn

    Ninn Custom Crochet Queen

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    get a couple of sheep for him to guard and he will be happy again.
     
  13. animalfarmer

    animalfarmer Well-Known Member

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    They do need to feel useful,and right now he misses his sheep.He may learn in time to protect your goats,ours do that very effectively.Everything,including you,is new to him there.He will need time to adjust to you and your farm.Try to stand in his pasture and talk to him in a quiet voice.He will want to investigate you close up.I have found that animal crackers have been the great equalizer.Have fun!!
     
  14. Liese

    Liese Namaste

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    Hello there, We have 2 llamas-got the gelding first to be a guardian for sheep & goats but he hummed all the time and after 2 weeks we went back and got a female, that made Llew very happy, though he is subserviant to Her Majesty. Anyway, I knew nothing about llamas and this guy was 3 y/o and no handling - oh, boy! So first got the Camelid Companion book-wonderful, learnt lots of things and ways, got a good fitting harness -their nose bones are short and so you need a special one for the times you may wish to tie-trimming his nails and clipping his fleece. Most of it is just taking time, llamas are intelligent, curious and sensitive. Llew has gone from being a nervous wreck to a calm but aloof fellow, he will stay kushed down when I walk past him-a sign that he trusts me. He continues to be a wonderful guardian but it is fascinating to watch the interplay between Llew and Lashes, so depending on your circumstances you may wish to investigate getting your gelding a companion-let the neck wrestling begin!
    As for feeding I have just started giving them goat feed-just a 1/2#,each & hand fed. They have lived very well off a brushy 2+ acre field with the Nigerian goats and a weedy hay, loose goat mineral. You might see if there is a llama rescue in your region, the Southeastern Llama Rescue was a great resource for me for feeding, handling and other suggestions. But Marty Bennet's web site and book was definitely a good purchase for me. Oh, if he starts looking like he will spit (this happened only once for me) put your arm straight up-get tall and say firmly "no spitting".
    Best to you and Obama. Liese, Piedmont region, NC
     
  15. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have to second Marty's book, The Camelid Companion. My girl was two years old and never handled and using those methods she trusts me to do about anything with her. She was even in a parade last year.

    Most likely your llama will need a non working diet of grass hay and minerals. Mine was starting to get fat on our goat grain mix.

    I'm sure your llama and goats will become good friends. Ours even lets kids play king of the mountain on her back while kushed :)
     
  16. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    Liese has llamas named Llew and Lashes... :p
     
  17. Marilyn in CO

    Marilyn in CO Well-Known Member

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    We have two females and an intact male. They tolerate each other and are in with mama cows....protecting from coyotes and strange dogs. The male gets very depressed if he is by himself, the girls could care less about him, but he is happy if he can be boss of the mama cows.......he thinks they belong to him.LOL They eat what the cows eat, easy keepers. Llamas are TOUGH, they really don't need to be pampered. I always threaten to get rid of them but they grow on ya. One of the girls loves to spit at you for no reason. The male chest butted me down when my back was turned, now I never turn my back to him........so be careful, they can hurt you. They are strong boogers. When I first got them I fancied they were just like overgrown dogs......no so. Llamas can take you or leave you.
     
  18. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    Great advice from everyone. I appreciate you. Obama is out in the rain this moring, and the goats are too, so guess they must like it, or they would go to the barn.
     
  19. highplains

    highplains Well-Known Member

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    We have a bachelor herd, they are all fairly nice. One wasn't worked with much when it was young and has a 'tude'. But for the most part even he is pretty nice, they are mostly retired pack animals. We have them all hand trained (to eat out of your hand). Later on you might try to halter him which really helps when you have to move them, have the vet check them etc.
    Get trust built first and ALWAYS reward him. Negative reinforcement is amplified many times more than positive reinforcement, and we have finally come to the point that it just is not worth it in training.
    Positive things such as snacks, exploring, (they are amazingly curious), and as mentioned before talking to them in a quiet voice will really help him get used to you.
    Good luck and congratulations on the new addition!
     
  20. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Do people eat lamas? Looks like they would be better than mutton.