llamas - need advise please

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by prairie hill, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. prairie hill

    prairie hill Well-Known Member

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    Anyone keep llamas? I'm considering getting several on loan from a neighbor to graze weeds on part of our property. He said they eat what cows won't... our area has had an invasion of sandburs this year, and they are threatening to get the better of us. There are other weeds, and annual rye which was planted on purpose, in the area we are thinking about grazing the llamas.

    We're looking at about 1.5 acres on our property. Only our property line on one side is fenced, so we're thinking electric fencing might be the least costly. What else do we need to know? Is this even a good idea?

    :help: Thanks!
     
  2. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    I duno...My llamas tend to stick to straight grass. And my cattle do a pretty good job of everything else. Maybe my llamas are just picky? lol. The only thing about electric fencing, is because of their wool, it doesn't bother them that much. If you use the tape electric fencing ( like horse fencing) it would probably work best, because then they actually see a "fence" there too.
     

  3. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    My SIL has a bunch of llamas- a dozen or so. She has a couple of smallish paddocks, one for boys, one for the girls, made out of 4' high cattle panels and t-posts. The panels aren't cheap, but they are easy to move around. You could get 10-12 of those and move them around as needed (probably every few days). We used them for our goats when we had just a few. We tied the panels to the posts with used hay strings and it was super easy to move.

    I don't know how effective thay are at weed control. SIL's are on grass. I do know that goats and donkeys are awesome- they eat thistle, burdock, and stinging nettle like it was goat candy!
     
  4. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    Our llamas seem to stick to grass too. The goats and donkeys are much better at eating the weeds. Even out cows will occasionally eat at thistles and other weeds (for variety I guess) but the llamas seem to be more picky.
     
  5. Marilyn in CO

    Marilyn in CO Well-Known Member

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    We have 3 and they are pretty good weed eaters, I know they will eat your rye as ours have. We use a single wire electric fence and they respect it, they could easily jump over it but they don't. They seem to understand boundaries better than the cows. We do tie some caution tape every so often on the wire when they are first let out on pasture until they are accustomed to the fence.
     
  6. m39fan

    m39fan Acres of Blessing Farm

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    I agree with most of the others. Our Llama's stick to grass almost exclusively. Goats are what you need, they'll even eat multiflora roses! As far as keeping them in, ours do fine with two strands of polywire and a middle of galvanized. Neither they or the horses have ever challenged the fence.

    HTH,
    Mike
     
  7. prairie hill

    prairie hill Well-Known Member

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    Mike - are you referring to goats with your fencing recommendation? (Or llamas?)
     
  8. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I just saw a llama at the auction last week, he went for $300.
     
  9. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They do better than just eat it, they THRIVE on it and will rid your pastures of it pretty darn quick. :) Goats! Mans best friend!! :dance:
     
  10. m39fan

    m39fan Acres of Blessing Farm

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    prairie hill - It may be a little late, but my comment re: fencing was on the Llamas. Out of curiosity, what did you end up doing?

    Take Care,
    Mike
     
  11. rockinl

    rockinl Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I just saw this thread. I have alpacas and llamas. I had to get some goats to deal with the sand burs because the llamas and alpacas did not.
    Also a very important item. Rye grass is not good for llamas. My vet just told me of an illnees called "rye staggers" in camelids (alpacas, llamas amd camels). It can harm them. So, I would not recommend it.

    I got some little pygmy goats, and they did pretty good on the weeds, but they sure ate my grass too.

    :shrug: :shrug:

    Good luck, Kimberly
     
  12. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Rye grass "staggers" is associated more with perennial (sp?) rye grass. Annual rye grass and cereal rye dont have that problem as far as I know.