Llamas. Anything I'm not thinking of?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jen H, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    These 2 llamas formerly belonged to an animal collector and are in need of a forever home. They've been well fed and nursed back to health. I've seen them, and they're awesome critters. I just need to know if there's anything obvious I'm not thinking of before I bring them here.

    1) I've been out to see them several times. They're sweet and friendly. They'll let me touch them briefly before moving off.

    2) They're used to other critters around. There's a cat and a horse sharing the pasture with them, and they're all friends. (the horse is awesome, if she was available, she'd be coming home with me in a heartbeat!)

    3) I've arranged for my vet to see them tomorrow and check them out. Their feet need trimming, one of them has really long teeth. I'll have them checked out for worms and diseases.

    4) This is a father/son pair. Both have been fixed - wethered? gelded? neutered? I don't know the right term with llamas. Father is 3, son is 1. I know they get fighting teeth that will have to be dealt with.

    5) They'll spend the first month or so here in their own pasture with a shelter so we can get used to them, they can get used to us, and the the other critters can adapt.

    6) Both are halter trained and walk on a lead.

    Anything I'm missing in regards to these critters?
     
  2. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you walked them on a lead? Before bringing them home, get them used to you walking them.

    They will routinely need their hooves and teeth trimmed. You may be able to do it yourself. Ask the owner and the vet about this.

    Who is going to shear them? And what are you going to do with the fleece?
     

  3. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I spin and weave - I have big plans for that fleece! :) As to the shearing, I shear our sheep. I'll need to look into who's available for shearing llamas (they're too big for the normal "you hold them while I cut" method we use).

    I have not walked them on lead myself. I'll make sure I spend some time with them tomorrow with the current caretaker haltering them and leading them.

    I knew their feet needed trimming on a regular basis. I didn't realize their teeth needed to be trimmed as well. I thought it was just the fighting teeth that needed to be dealt with. I'll make sure and talk with the vet about that.

    Thanks for a couple more things to put down on the list!
     
  4. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    What color are they Jen?? Will you cover them? (thinking of my llama fleece from heck in my closet full of burrs and matts)
     
  5. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    They're both white with reddish-brown saddles and dark eye patches. The 1 year old is 1/2 suri. Apparently, the 1 year old actually had dreadlocks when the foster lady (the current owner) got him. The 1 year old has more white on him than the 3 year old does.

    I'm planning to put coats on them. But I was planning to put coats on the sheep, too, and that just didn't get done. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    Just a word of warning that if you put them with your other animals they may try to breed them. Even a gelded llama will sometimes attempt it, especially if he has bred before getting gelded.
     
  7. dagwood

    dagwood Well-Known Member

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    If you have sheep you will have the best guard animals in the world with those Llamas. They will bond with nearly any herd of animals as well as sheep. Minimize your contact with them....and watch for the spitting thing they like to do.....kinda nasty it is.

    The manure you get from them is very good for the garden and flowers as well.....

    A good farrier can handle their feet and the Vet should be able to float their teeth hopefully without too much difficulty..... :)
     
  8. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Guard llamas are started young with sheep to get them to bond with sheep. Your llamas may or may not guard the sheep. I think you shear them while they stand nicely for you. Don't forget the hair dryer to keep them groomed.
     
  9. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    If you have ewes,, do not put them in with the sheep!!

    Male llama's are no good around ewes, as they smell very much like Female llama's. I know..as I found out the hard way. It was a nightmare.

    Gelded male llama was fine with the Rams though.
     
  10. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Good to know! I never even thought about them trying to breed the sheep and goats. My concern was with them getting along with the other critters. I'm going to have to re-think my pasture plans and really keep an eye on everyone.

    I'm not getting these guys for guard critters, although if they do guard that would be an awesome side line. Mostly, the humane society needs a home for these guys and I'm on their list for fostering large animals. That's why the shelter called me. They'll be pasture pets (and cozy shawls). The lady who's been fostering them is moving into town and can't take the llamas with her.

    Their health checked out fine. Feet and teeth have been trimmed, and both llamas stood nicely for that. I'll work with them more this weekend while I beef up the shelter out in the pasture for them. Currently they have a couple of tarps and they weathered the wind storm and snow just fine. I want at least a couple of walls and a roof for them before I bring them here.
     
  11. Janis Sauncy

    Janis Sauncy Well-Known Member

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    I brought a llama home from auction some years back. I paid $40.00 for him (a gelding), with the plan that he would help in predator control. I was having huge problems with coyotes.

    To make a long story short, I can't tell you how many piles of duck, goose and chicken feathers showed up in the same pasture as "Thumper." I was told, after the fact, that they are better at predator control if you have more than one; Then they turn it into a game. I never did get another one, though.

    Thumper did bond well with the goats, though. And the horse.

    And the manure is great. He was my only llama experience, so I don't know if they all do it, but he would "poop" in a long row. It was kind of funny. There would be this snake-like row of llama poop across the pasture. But it made it easy to scoop up.

    The last farm-slaughtering place I wrapped meat at, just before I left, two llamas came in. All went into ground and trust me, it didn't look tasty at all. My boss at the first place I wrapped meat at refused llamas. And pot-bellied pigs.