LLAMA question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Marjorie Dickso, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. Marjorie Dickso

    Marjorie Dickso Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Location:
    NE Kansas
    Hi..maybe this isn't the correct place..but

    Thinking of getting a llama because of coyotes. Are they good for that? What is the type of llama I should get. Don't want to breed. So, should I get a female or male. Can males be "gelded". I know nothing of them but I do have about every other type of animal. Also, what do they eat?
    Thanks
     
  2. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    300
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    I have friends using geldings and retired breeding females. The brood females are very protective and the geldings become good friends with goats. I would say that you could get either for really cheap from a breeder. Ask a llama breeder what they feed when you find one, but I know someone who feeds grass, oat and alfalfa hay along with the feed he picks up from the goat feeders. Basically her guard llama gets what the goats get.

    Hope this helps
     

  3. livestockmom

    livestockmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    252
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    We have 6 females and 1 gilded male for Guardians in our pastures for sheep and goats for protection against predation.

    I agree, gilded males and females that have produced crias before.

    I don't know where you can get llamas inexpensivly. Here, they come at a premium price. The breeding for our females cost us $500.00 a piece alone.
    (Registered)

    Most breeders will say no grain or alfalfa for llamas, especially for gilded males.

    We have found them to be fantastic guards and very enjoyable.
     
  4. Key

    Key Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    141
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Location:
    PA
    Llamas are great watchdogs...take my word for it.....

    A few years ago, I entered a horse pasture to retreive some horses for a trail ride, and an unfixed male llama ATTACKED me! My back will never be the same (he hit me from behind), and he ended up breaking my nose since I hit the ground so hard! So, please don't get an unfixed male because I shiver at the possible outcomes.....

    Prices for llamas in PA are VERY low since interest in them as pets has decreased over the past few years....the male that attacked me sold for $60!

    The horse stable I mentioned above just fed the llama 10% horse feed and hay, and he was healthly and a bit too protective!
     
  5. cath

    cath Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    We have alpacas and one gelded male guard llama in an area surrounded by coyotes and dogs that owners let run wild. We've never had a problem with any canines in the pasture, even our dogs (who the llama knows and tolerates) will avoid going back there without us.

    Today we went back to put some antibiotic salve on an open wound that our youngest alpaca somehow received and the llama really got upset at my hubby! He screamed at hubby and even spit on him (a real no-no for llamas to spit on humans, he's never done it before, but he was so upset that he lost his mind!)! Hubby just screamed back and spit right in the llama's face! The llama just had a surprised expression on his face and backed off, no more spitting or screaming from him!

    Even though I was the one applying the salve and my 4 year old daughter was right next to me holding the alpaca's lead, I felt no concern that the llama would aggress upon us. He was just angry at hubby and didn't even look at us. We clearly do not represent any threat in his mind.

    So, yes, llamas are good guardians!

    BTW, we got our llama for free from a local breeder that had no use for him anymore.
     
  6. Marjorie Dickso

    Marjorie Dickso Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Location:
    NE Kansas
    Thanks for all the replys. I am now rethinking this. What I wanted the llama to do is protect the chickens up near the house. Wouldn't want anyone hurt by one.hmmmm
    Two intact llamas went thru..$35 each. I passed on them until I knew more about them. Grandkids are always here..so maybe I better not until I can buy one from an individual that knows the llama.
     
  7. Joshua's PC

    Joshua's PC New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Location:
    Iowa
    I used to work with a lady who had Llamas and goats, and her un-gelded male Llama killed 2 of her 5 goats by trying to mount them :eek: .

    The lady didn't seem to surprised about the whole ordeal, which leads me to believe that maybe gelding is a good idea with male Llamas. They also spit, however I heard that this is alleviated by only having a single male or no male at all. I've heard some funny spitting stories from my friend at work. Llamas have a wide range of monetary value, from $60 to $25,000 depending on their colors and most of all the market. Apparently their value in the general market changes daily so if you get a good offer again, take it. Your $35 could turn into a couple thousand. However, buy it for functional reasons not for their value (they will be worthless again by the time you find a buyer).

    Donkeys on the other hand seem to be less agressive with goats and the like... and I watched a Donkey almost stomp my cocker spaniel to death when I was a teenager. They definately don't like any meat eating animals snooping around. I would say that they are a better option, they are smart and loving. However they are also noisy at times. No worse than the goats though right?