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Discussion Starter #1
It seems to me there are two trains of thought when it comes to preparing for an unknown future. Move as far away from everything as you can and cut as much contacts as possible, with the modern world. The other option is to hide in plain sight, so to speak. Live in town, go to a normal job, and make preparations without making a scene. In other words more of a academic type of preparing rather than a real change in lifestyle. Yes, I understand there are many shades of grey between the two extremes of this idea.

What are your thoughts on a happy middle ground? What I mean is living close to a town, or on the edge of a town. Maybe not a full time job in town, but seeking to make some income from in town, or towns people?

I ask, because my original plan was to move more rural than I currently am. However, due to travel expenses that limits what I can do to earn money to internet sales or some type of sales that involves infrequent trips to make sales? So what about living on the edge of town? Close enough to transit to a job or make deliveries of farm products on a daily basis?

I have a property that is close to town (relatively speaking) a few miles. I can ride my mule to any store in town if needed. I could also hitch up a wagon and go to the feed store if need be. I am thinking now, maybe this is a better option. Once I get so far out, the possibility of saddling up or hitching up the wagon to go into town is all but out of the question. I could not make a 2 day trip to town in other words.

Has anyone else thought about the benefits of a closer proximity to a town might be? or drawbacks even?
 

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For me it would really come down to the size of the town and how close any major cities or larger towns were near me. I live in town but there's only about 1800 people and the nearest big town near me is 70 miles away. I also feel very secure in knowing that we take care of our own here, so if shtf the town will band together. Get rid of the riff Raff and secure our town.
 

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This is a tough nut to crack. Let me tell you what I did might give you an idea. I found a small parcel (36ac) of land timberland. It was for sale in the midst of much bigger many hundred acre tracts of land. It's only about 3 miles from the county courthouse and 6-7 miles from town. Town is one stop light, a grocery, couple antique shops, a gas station etc. You get the idea small place few people. It's 2 miles to my closest neighbor. The grid is 2 miles also. Plenty of service work in the area as most residents are retired...

Larry
 

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we are by no means hard core preppers , we chose to live in a small town similar to the one i grew up in , we very much keep it mostly normal , but with a year to 2 year wood pile and shed

we try to plan for the storms and downs of life

we do have a garden I have no illoutions that we could eat exclusivly from it , we have had chickens we don't at the moment

we do have a fully fenced double lot that contains our garden and room for our GSD to run as she pleases with our house built in 1909 in the middle of the fence and a 2 story city barn

we are very much plain sight preppers , like i said we are not hard core , we are not going to cut ties and live remote we are very involved in the community scouts 4h church , I can't work from home which affords us a lot of flexability if I can't get seriose internet.

the things you may do or have around are all very much in context , why do you have a generator , becuse storms happen , and it keeps the freezer going

food , well no one really sees that

a garden , it's a hobby

ammo , guns , it's a hobby i enjoy reloading , shooting and hunting

big fenced in yard , we like the dog to be able to roam and actually it was put in when my son was very little and liked to run , ususlay for the street which isn't busy but there are/were a lot of pools around the 4-5 foot deep inflatable type the wife had nightmares about him getting out of the house and taking a swim in one of them and then i installed a fence , I actually like the fence I laid it out the way I wanted and I really like the dog can go in or out either door as she likes and be happy in the yard and not tied up

so i guess my vote is know the people make the freindships or relationship in buissines or as a member of a church or club kind of hide in plain sight
 

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We are all individuals with different likes, tolerance, etc. What works for one person might not be best for another. Some love small town living, feel secure and "homestead on", some need a more rural setting to do so and others find a way to do it in a very populated area.

Currently we are in a small town (compare to where we grew up....me big city suburb, DH large town in the middle on no where). We "make do" here, but it's not where our heart is. BUT, due to DH's job and personality this is where we are. I can happily live here and "homestead on" for the rest of my life if I have to. I can walk to everything I must have and feel rather secure in doing so. But the down side is there are many self sufficiency things we can't do here......animals, a well, etc.

We are now 17 yrs into our 5 yr plan, lol. This house was to be a stepping stone, LOL. 20 yrs ago we would have assumed we would be living on 10-20 ac of rolling wooded land by now.....not Main Street, Smalltown, USA.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is what I am thinking about. If we had a deadline of say "Next year" it would be much easier to prepare and stock up and plan to cut ties, but there is not deadline, not even a timeline, just speculation really and some calculated risk assessment on our parts. Having said that the longer a person can stay plugged in, so to speak and benefit from what can be build from the extra income and resources provided by modern society the better we can prepare, in my view. However, there are different ways to keep this connection and I guess that is where my curiosity lies, how do others who choose to keep these connections go about doing it, without compromising the lifestyle they are wanting. Or as in OD's case you do make a compromise, and give up some of the things you had originally wanted.

I know there are some things I can not or will not give up, my animals for instance. I also know I can benefit from having close ties to a community, such as steady income sources. I have a place that is farther out, but unless I was no longer in need of an income, the travel expense to and from town would consume a large part of any $$$ which could be made from a community tie, or I would have to limit my income potential to internet sales etc.
 

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theres a place about 70 miles from me in a city..its like a barter town...the place is packed with people.


there use to be a place here local that alot of trading went on...you could drop stuff off or tell him what you wanted..or leave something to be sold and bartered for.you could go in there and pick up eggs...church ladies in fall had applebutter to sell...amish items..always small livestock to trade around on....etc. i miss it !!!!!!
 

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This is what I am thinking about. If we had a deadline of say "Next year" it would be much easier to prepare and stock up and plan to cut ties, but there is not deadline, not even a timeline, just speculation really and some calculated risk assessment on our parts. Having said that the longer a person can stay plugged in, so to speak and benefit from what can be build from the extra income and resources provided by modern society the better we can prepare, in my view. However, there are different ways to keep this connection and I guess that is where my curiosity lies, how do others who choose to keep these connections go about doing it, without compromising the lifestyle they are wanting. Or as in OD's case you do make a compromise, and give up some of the things you had originally wanted.

I know there are some things I can not or will not give up, my animals for instance. I also know I can benefit from having close ties to a community, such as steady income sources. I have a place that is farther out, but unless I was no longer in need of an income, the travel expense to and from town would consume a large part of any $$$ which could be made from a community tie, or I would have to limit my income potential to internet sales etc.
That's the problem all right, no schedule available. Every morning I turn on the news to see if the words "Bank Holiday" will be spoken. Those two words are the signal that if you haven't prepared, it's too late.

We made our decision quite some time ago, and are reasonably satisfied we've done what we can for future security and subsistence. My wife works 25 miles away in Springfield, and drives a full size PU (she's hit 2 deer in 3 years), so we can sympathize with the commute time/cost.

It might mean changing your focus somewhat, but is there a way you could at least set up the operational fundamentals at your remote place? Fencing, sheds, barn, etc.? If you know the move is somewhere in your future it wouldn't be time or money wasted.
 

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We are outside of town. With my donkeys and a cart I quickly realized that I was too far to easily get to a grocery store, but the hardware was doable. I think you have the best of both worlds. If you are worried about being overrun with ‘city’ people, make your place look nondescript. No beautiful white fences, that sort of thing. People passing by would be able to see your animals, but not your stores. Few people can ride well and even fewer can hitch up a team let alone drive. If food is scarce, you might want to think about hedgerows so people can’t see your herd of swine or sheep or goats from the road.
 

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I was in Alaska last year. A little isolated town visiting relatives. Everyone depended on everyone. They had food storage, gardens, vehicles that worked most of the time.
I can't see, even there how someone bars the door. After living there for a few weeks and getting to know how the community depended on each I just don't know how any of us could hide away.
I'm beginning to believe that isolated safety is a myth. Am I wrong? I know I'll try just that if I need to.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Safety as far as a particular area is concerned, in my opinion is all relative to the perceived threat. There is a lot to be said for safety in numbers (if those numbers are all on your side) at the same time if there are many numbers against you and you are isolated away from additional help, that may be a bad situation. Now if you could isolate yourself to the point no one knew you were there? That would be different all together. That would also require you to have a very small footprint, which may be difficult if you are attempting to provide 100% of your needs. I am not sure there is a right or wrong answer, it will all depend on the perceived threat and proper risk assessment.

Keep in mind also family dynamics will play into it. A single person has options a family may not have or may not be able to consider and vice versa.
 

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Hiding in plain sight may be one of the better options or not. Everything hinges off of something else. All that any of us can do is make the best decisions with the knowledge on hand and do our best.

Larry

Muleman check your PM's
 

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I kind of like the Hiding in Plain Sight theory. We have lived here for over 20 years, so people know we exist. I have a Church, have volunteered at the kids school, and will help with a local disaster. That said, I'm very much an introvert, as is DH. We deal with the public because we HAVE to, (jobs) not because we want to. DH and DS are currently on a motorcycle adventure, and I'm loving my alone time. But I'll be thrilled when they return tonight. Other people? Bah, don't care if I ever see another person coming up my driveway.

I NEVER talk to anyone about prepping. Most people here have gardens, mine is just bigger than most. But you would not know that, unless you were seriously trespassing, as my 'small' garden is near the house, exactly where people would expect it to be. We have cows, but never mention how many. We have horses, but never mention how many....if asked, I just say a couple.

The older I get, the less inclined I get to answer questions anyway. People seem to think they have the right to ask any question, no matter how personal. I just give them the one eyebrow lift, and I'll add a snort if they persist. Even the dullest dullard can figure out that sign language!
 

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I recall a wonderful article in Countryside Magazine, (seems like a lifetime ago now), where it was suggested you take a map, draw a circle around a city that would extend no more than one hour away (driving) to the edge of said circle.

Then, look for your homestead within that circle. That way, if you had to commute for income, it wasn't too awful (DH does this), and you could still be far away enough from the city to homestead. Of course, then you would have the perks of whatever that city offered too.

That's what we did. At the time I was a little less concerned about contagions, economic collapse, emp's, etc., than I am now. I was somewhat worried, surely more than the average Mrs. Joe! DH was never all that concerned but he is now. Still not as concerned as I wish, but he's getting there.

This worked for us. DH works, I was the stay-at-home homesteader wife, voluntarily. Now, I can't leave the house much due to health issues, but am still doing the homesteading. Well he does too of course, but is restricted to the weekends.

Health issues is a big one to consider. Never in my wildest imaginations would I have thought I would have the health issues that have hit me. Some were resolved surgically, and required much PT after. Some, are here to stay.

So, that only one hour away - major factor. If we had moved somewhere far out, what would we have done? How could I have possibly had PT 3 x weekly?

I think the main goal is the biggest factor when all is said and done. Are you wanting to be able to live thru a major catastrophe, or are you wanting to live a homesteading life? Is long-term self sufficiency the goal, or more along the lines of stocking up supplies for X amount of years' worth, away from people til it all gets better?

Age, health, these two things are big factors......

just my rambling.........
 
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Homesteader, you may call it rambling, I call it reality for most of us.

We are buried deep in the throes of a 1.5 MILLION CITY! We hide "in plain sight." We have a couple friends and neighbors who have complementary items. And are within walking distance. One has to make the best of what they have, until they can have better...
 
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