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Expect the unexpected
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For some reason and I don't know why I have become quite interested
in reading personal stories from people who lived through the WW2 time
in England. I like trying to understand how they made it through while being
rationed on a lot of things.

I do have a question if any history buffs can help me. What happened to all
the metal fences etc, that were tore down to be used in the war efforts.
Several times I have read that the metal was not used.
So if it was not used, what happened to it ?
 

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I can't help you personally, but I can share a story of a lovely lady that I met through my hubby back in the late 1980's that was a spy during WWII. The special forces group adopted her and lovingly called her "Frenchie". What a tiny little spitfire she was. I told her she should write a book, but she wasn't interested. She loved being with the guys and sharing stories. She was an amazing lady.
 

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If it wasn't repurposed it was melted down for the manufacture of other postwar goods.
 

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Do the people have to be in England? We are watching a Netflix series now called A French Village. It follows the inhabitants of a village in France from the beginning of WWII through the 1970's There are 20 DVDs with English subtitles. We thought we would not be able to stand the subtitles but it is so good we are on DVD 17. It is a fictional series but is based on real life events. And you get to learn some French! :)
 
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A British woman called Caroline started a very interesting site all about WW2 rationing. Her original idea was to use rationing as a way to lose weight WW2. She is also on Instagram.

 

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My MIL was an evacuee.

She was young and could remember things about leaving her mother and the place she was sent to and at least she had her sisters with her.
 

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For some reason and I don't know why I have become quite interested
in reading personal stories from people who lived through the WW2 time
in England. I like trying to understand how they made it through while being
rationed on a lot of things.

I do have a question if any history buffs can help me. What happened to all
the metal fences etc, that were tore down to be used in the war efforts.
Several times I have read that the metal was not used.
So if it was not used, what happened to it ?
The citizens of England were certainly inconvenienced by the war. In Poland and the Check Republic they suffered. The German soldiers looted their homes, and took all of their livestock and food. They resorted to eating grass, tree bark, and sometimes each other. Very little was ever written about this, because after the war they were under the Soviets. Stalin's camps in Siberia killed more people than all of the camps the Germans had.
 

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A British woman called Caroline started a very interesting site all about WW2 rationing. Her original idea was to use rationing as a way to lose weight WW2. She is also on Instagram.

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We have this book marked... Have down loaded many recipes and used most of what we have archived so far.. Most are mot fancy, not 5 star quality maybe, but good wholesome family meals to use common available ingredients, produce and the like.. Sweetie is a bread baker, and we make "National Loaf" periodically..

We plan to go through many more of these recipes as time, and our far north garden, and berry bushes allow..
 

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My father was born in 1924 so grew up during the depression. By the time ww2 began for the U.S. we went from no money to buy anything to rationing. One of my favorite stories he told was about a sheep rancher applying to the rationing board for canvas to construct lambing sheds. He was told to just put off lambing until warmer weather! Beurocracy at its finest!
 

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My Yvonne’s oma (grandmother) was born in Germany, 1924. Lived through the days of bread basket filled with cash in hopes of buying one loaf of bread. Told stories of german soldiers making her climb up in trees to recover various body parts, arms legs etc after bombing raids.life was no picnic for anyone during game those times.
 

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newfieannie
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my husband fought for the british during the first half of the war. he use to tell me stories about coming home on leave and trying to get through london during air raids. had a few close calls but his ship had already been hit a couple times so he took it in stride. his mother had a farm and he said there was plenty food once he got there. they had sheep, chicken etc. ~Georgia
 

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The citizens of England were certainly inconvenienced by the war. In Poland and the Check Republic they suffered. The German soldiers looted their homes, and took all of their livestock and food. They resorted to eating grass, tree bark, and sometimes each other. Very little was ever written about this, because after the war they were under the Soviets. Stalin's camps in Siberia killed more people than all of the camps the Germans had.
Actually in recent years much has been written about those areas during WWII.
 

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my husband fought for the british during the first half of the war. he use to tell me stories about coming home on leave and trying to get through london during air raids. had a few close calls but his ship had already been hit a couple times so he took it in stride. his mother had a farm and he said there was plenty food once he got there. they had sheep, chicken etc. ~Georgia
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A little different prospective of the time.... My Sweeties mother tells some things about growing up on the Canadian Pacific coast light house during WW2.. One or more houses being on islands on the inside passage.. They were quite self contained and self sufficient, but got things they needed delivered by the Coast Guard buoy and light house tender ship... They would always make a meal for the ships crew... As my Sweetie grew up on the light house that is where she learned to make spaghetti for the Navy... Out of habit she still makes it that way even just for the two of us..
 
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There is a BBC series titled Wartime Farm (YouTube) that provides some history of life in England during the war, with a focus on the important role of agriculture. We've (misses/me) watched the series several times.
 

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My Scottish friends who were dog breeders told me there was no food available for dogs, so they walked up and down the roads, looking for road kill rabbits to feed to the dogs.

Some breeds of dogs nearly went extinct because no one could breed litters when there was no food for the dogs. Deerhounds (my breed) used to come in several colors but after WWII only the graybrindle gene was left and now all Deerhounds are gray brindle. All the other colors died out.
 

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Not England but in the USA my mother had a tale of being invited out to dinner and the hostess had a huge roast to serve. Everyone was surprised because meat was rationed.

Horse meat wasn't rationed and their hostess was serving her guests horse meat.
 

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Rationing did not end in Britain until 1954. On 31 December 2006, Britain made a final payment of about $83million (£45.5m) and thereby discharged the last of its war loans from the US.

When war started in Britain in 1939 over 750,000 pets were put down in preparation for food shortages. What and awful choice to have to make but people did this out of love and fear. Not just because of food shortages for their pets but also about what would happen to them if they themselves died or were badly injured. In September 1940 when the bombing started even more people.

Another horror of the war was having to send your children out of the city to the countryside - or overseas - to escape the bombing of the cities. Some children had a wonderful life with their adopted families while others were abused and used. Some died anyways from the bombing as German bombers would drop their left over bombs on small towns and even farm buildings as they could save fuel flying home. And one ship taking children to Canada was sunk and 80 of the 100 children died.

Many parents who were forced to send their children away never recovered from the loss. Some because the kids never wanted to come home or could not come home and others simply from being separated from their children and faces with the same sort of depression and anxiety we would face today.

Despite the fact that Britain suffered enormously during the war the countries occupied by Germany and Japan had it much worse.
 
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