livestock transport service

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by FarmerCop, May 11, 2005.

  1. FarmerCop

    FarmerCop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    May 11, 2005
    I was wondering if someone wouldn't mind being brutally honest with my question?

    I am considering starting a small livestock transport service for those who may not have time to transport there animals, or those who've lost a means to transport, to sale barns, slaughter, etc....
    but mostly for those who could utilize an extra truck, trailer and hand when needed,
    i know this prolly sketchy but this is just a general idea for now ya know?
    I am in georgia and I am considering going to alabama,florida,tennesee and south carolina just in these areas but any ways whatya think


    and thanks so much for the help
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
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    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    A few problems pop up doing this;
    1. Crossing state lines and knowing the regulations.
    2. Haveing a set up flexable enough to accomendate different types of live stock, horses to hogs in how many minutes? Chickens to cows, ect.
    3. Adequate profit after fuel, insurance, down time, vehicle wear and tear, ect.
    4. Enought population to support this idea.
    5. Loading down time; 'Shes in the north paddock, somewhere on the 112 acres'.
    6. Liability for injured animals.
    7. Bad checks, slow pay.
    8. Welcome to these forums.

    I would suggest a concentrated service area, such as serviceing only one or two auctions before laying out big investments.
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    MN
    To echo Moopups, the regulation, insurance, & DOT licencing issues will swamp you with costs. My understanding is that insurance for a commercial rig of even a pickup & gooseneck starts at $6000 and more. CDL. And so on.

    Going to different states involves a lot more paperwork, you need to follow each state DOT terms.

    If you are familiar with trucking, then you might have a good idea. If you haven't thought of these issues, take a deep look into what your up-front regulatory costs will be before you are allowed to earn on dime....

    Were you thinking a gooseneck, a cargo truck, or a semi truck for hauling? Will you be willing to haul 2 critters, 20+ critters, or either? Going 100 miles with 2 animals costs a lot per animal, while hauling 35 cattle with a trailer that holds 6 head takes a lot of time. :)

    Charge enough to cover your costs, and they go to an inlaw that has an old horse trailer, hook it on the Suburban & feel they are saving money over the 'ripoff' prices you charge...

    Around here there used to be several such that would truck livestock in a 150 mile radius with a striaght truck. Most have quit due to the costs. Others are simply doing a load now & then & trying not to get caught. Don't know if any real independent livestock haulers are left, perhaps one.

    Don't want to be negative, just pointing out the pitfalls. If you can see making it work, go for it.

    --->Paul
     
  4. FarmerCop

    FarmerCop Well-Known Member

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    May 11, 2005
    thanks for the welcome and thanks for the honesty it really helped out1

    I do see the logic in working in my area and around this state alone, however to answer a question posed I will not be using a rig, I will be using my truck and trailer, as far as going big right off, well I don't see that I figured I could just make a few bucks here and there, I guess in my mind I am so set on trying it i plumb forgot the insurance, good thing I am trying to work out the kinks now thanks for your advice
     
  5. Ken in Minn

    Ken in Minn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Nov 10, 2002
    Hi
    If you are in the business, I will have a medium size gentle bull to hual from the east coast to Minn. in about three months. If interested, get back to me.
    Thanks

    Ken in Minn
     
  6. John Hill

    John Hill Grand Master

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    Location:
    New Zealand
    I think if you are planning a small operation to carry various types of animals it would be important to offer the appearance of a 'superior' service. Your vehicles would have to be clean, inside and out, you would need provision for feed and water. In this country (New Zealand) you cannot discharge the manure onto the road so you need to think about that too.

    If your transport environment is anything like Australia there may well be a place for such a 'special' service. One farmer in Queensland (Australia) is reported to have sent his prize sow to the annual agricultural show in a chafeur driven limo because that was cheaper than offered by any stock transport operator, and no, she did not soil the limo.

    I suspect super clean vehicles and clean white coveralls may well encourage owners who value their prize stock to trust them to you. A sort of 'limo' service for that special horse, bull etc.
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I use such a service as you propose. I call several days prior to the scheduled sale and acknowledge that I have beef cattle (usually feeders) that need a ride. We tentatively set a pickup time and the approximate number of head. I know the service operator cannot be exactly on time as loading times will vary so I attempt to be first on his schedule so that the rig will be clean when coming on my farm. If I have a full trailer load, he goes directly to the sale. Otherwise to hold his expenses and my transport fee down he will go to other nearby farms to pick up additional cattle. The service operator is insured for animal injury by the salebarn and he is paid by the sale barn as the fee is deducted prior to my check being sent to me. Individual animal fees are $8 to$10 per and a trailer load (26) is $150 and the distance is 22 miles. I know this man works 2 sales per week. In between the sales he hauls for people needing animals moved to different pastures or for private one on one sales. Additionally, he works the bull sales that are held. Most of the bull sales offer free delivery anywhere in the US. The seller pays the fees and the bulls are delivered through a network of such haulers. Usually the bulls require him to travel up to 800 miles in one direction for his segment. I do not know what he is paid for that portion. My observations are.....this is his only job other than he raises some beef cattle himself, he always has a nice late model F350 4X4, his trailer is a steel(he told me the aluminum ones fracture with the use he applies), compartmented, roofed one with multiple doors (rear and side), If he is running late he always calls, he pitches in an is very helpful in loading, if you have poor facilities that hinder his access/departure or if you fail to be timely you will be the last person on his schedule or he will "have all he can handle for the day" if he does not want your business. If he arrives and the animals are not caught for loading he just leaves and it is unlikely that he will return until the end of the day if at all. He runs a business and he runs his service like one, not as a good ole boy.
     
  8. FarmerCop

    FarmerCop Well-Known Member

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    May 11, 2005
    I wish I was up and running otherwise I might oblige but I do appreciate the business you offered me. thank you
     
  9. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Nov 7, 2002
    Location:
    South West MI
    go to the critter site here and ask around for thoughts and suggestions. We have hired horses moved several times and the guy who was doing it retired and we bought his equipment and may start up the business.


    mikell
     
  10. Farmer Brown

    Farmer Brown Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    May 28, 2002
    Stock hauling is not such a big deal as all these fellers are letting on. I've done some of it on the side and it's just like hauling your own stuff. I only haul my own nowdays and hire out some. Tomorrow I have a guy coming to pick up a dozen holstien heifers to go to sale 60 miles away. He will charge $100 and be back by noon. I'd go but I hate having to hurry to sort and load and then sit in unloading line when lots to do here. Around here peple don't advertise and don't get special insurance--just regular farm insurance. No commercial stuff. Just a farmer hauling to market. Lot's of these guys who like to haul hang around the sale barns and get lots of loads all over that way. Some go to farm stock auctions and wait to be called on. Can get in more than one run most times. People get to know you and call you on weekend to set up hauling for coming week so can get more than one persons stock on a trip to barn. Nobody looks "commercial" Just a farmer making an extra buck with his private trailer. Anybody gets in a traffic stop and ask about cattle in back--you can bet they are his or his friends. Also can do same with flatbed. I have hire backhoe hauled from other side of state and drill pipe too. So much a mile. FB