little disappointed

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Al. Countryboy, Apr 27, 2006.

  1. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    We have had three older rabbits which we pare boiled and made different dishes and all were good. Well today I cleaned one of my 9 week old bunnies and cooked it like fryed chicken and was very disappointed. It was tough. I browned it lightly and let it simmer for at least 30 minutes. Where did I go wrong? :shrug: I was looking for a nine week old rabbit to fall off the bone.
     
  2. awfulestes

    awfulestes Well-Known Member

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    maybe it got to much excersize. You know to much room to run around in. LOL. I don't really know. What kind of rabbit was it?
     

  3. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    You cooked it too long, would be my guess. I tried to make rabbit alfredo one night, fryed the rabbit like I would chicken. Came out like tire rubber. Tasted Ok, but I couldn't stomach the texture. I haven't run into the same problem when wet-cooking it. It can simmer in a stew for hours and not get tough. Only when I fry it.

    I've been told that if you finely dice such overdone bunny and put it in a green salad, that it's tasty, and the texture is minimized due to the dicing. Haven't tried it yet though.
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    That was exactly my experience. 8 week old bunny, butchered in the afternoon, cooked in the evening. Browned, then simmered. Like chewing rubber bands. From what folks have said, the cure is to age the rabbit for a couple days in the fridge before cooking, just like chicken. I haven't tried that yet (my rabbits just had their first kits!), but it makes sense to me.
     
  5. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    would not letting it age have anything to do with it?? when we butcherd we always let what ever it was set in the fridge for a few days to "age" before freezing or cooking,
    also could diet maybe be a factor? is there a differint between grass fed and grain/pellet fed in rabbits like there is in cattle?

    dont know just asking, anyone know?
     
  6. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    I think it very well could have something to do with it. KSALguy. I'll be aging my next fryer before I cook it to find out :)
     
  7. Michael Leferink

    Michael Leferink Well-Known Member

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    Yep, aging is the key. Also, cooking at too high a heat can make it tough. We fry ours is veg. oil and butter using medium heat. 15 - 20 min. per side, depending on thickness. mmmmm...........good!!!

    If you like it really tender: flour the pieces, brown them, add a little water (wine) and simmer until it falls off the bone. Pour the brown gravy over rice and add your favorite vegi's. This is the most common rabbit dish in Cajun Country.

    MikeL
     
  8. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    They are in the rabbit tractor and eat winter rye with all the pellets they want. They do have plenty of running around room 4ft. x 8 ft. That could possibly make them tough. I had remembered that many did let them age in the frig. for a couple of days. We had just boiled an older rabbit for about 1 1/2 hrs. in water and spices and used it 3 different ways and was very good and tender. I figured that since this was a young rabbit that it would not need boiling or ageing. Guess I was wrong. I have 9 more to dress. Will try your ideas and suggestions next time. Thanks again.
     
  9. seanmn

    seanmn Well-Known Member

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    The way you raised them didn't make them tough or bland. In my experience rabbit is such a solid meat it just doesent fry like a chicken very well. Its just generally bland and chewy. I like to boil them with some seasoning and pull the meat off the bones and use it in place of chicken in hot dishes or soup....I've also had some good luck using it in stir-fry.
     
  10. awfulestes

    awfulestes Well-Known Member

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    I think a hyper rabbit that runs and hops all day compared to cage raised with enough room to turn around is going to make a diffrence in meat quality. I can be wronge and thats ok. Plus being that old it was almost a roaster right? He HE HEE the thread lives on.LOL