Linebreeding

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Countrygirl1, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. Countrygirl1

    Countrygirl1 Active Member

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    I was wondering what everyones take is on Linebreeding? I am interested in two ND does whom are bred to their Sire. If I were to get them they would kid here with me, so the linebreeding would stop there. I would not be breeding back with the Sire. I am worried because I may want to keep or sell the kids depending on what sex and so on. Would anything be wrong with them. The lady I would be purchasing from says she had no choice as he was the only buck they had. Any input on this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you:)

    Tristain :confused:
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Linebreeding and inbreeding has been used to develop practically every breed of livestock we have today. In the hands of an experienced breeder it is a valuable tool. In the hands of a novice it can be a disaster. Linebreeding intensifies the traits by narrowing your gene pool. Any time linebreeding is utilized you must ruthlessly cull undesirable traits or they will be intensified.

    It's one thing to linebreed after careful planning and studying pedigrees, but another to breed them just because that's all you have. Usually breeding father/daughter or mother/son will not be a problem so your kids should be fine.
     

  3. kath2003

    kath2003 Well-Known Member

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    What about brother and sister in dogs? :confused:
     
  4. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We had a son who bred his mother. The resulting doe did not thrive and died before her first birthday this year, the resulting wether is still okay as far as I know.
    Edited to say: We did not plan to have this breeding occur. The buck was taught to climb into the doe pen. He was shipped the following weekend.
    Inbreeding and linebreeding are very delicate matters.
     
  5. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Again, it depends on who's doing the breeding. In the hands of an experienced breeder who has been absoultely ruthless in his culling and has a particular purpose within his program for that breeding it would perfectly fine. BUT for someone without that experience you could have a problem. Brother/sister is much closer than father/daughter. You have a tighter gene pool so therefore the undesirable traits are intensified as well as the desirable ones. That's why culling is so important in any linebreeding or inbreeding program. If you have a trait show up that you don't want, and then you inbreed that individual that trait will be worse in the offspring.
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Well here goes yet another uppity answer :) I would pass on the does. It's one thing for a planned mating to be doeling back to her sire, it's well another thing to breed them "because there was no other buck", and then sell them as breeding stock. Now if you want them because the does themselves are nice, and you are far enough along in your goat breeding to be ABLE to kill at birth a kid who has a birth defect, mouth deformity, extra teats etc. than no you shouldn't buy animals this closely related, nor should you breed close until you can. Culling is spelled killing (butchering if you have something you can keep until butchering size), not selling to unsuspecting others. Are you also well enough versed in bloodlines to know if this buck is actually unrelated to the does themselves? I would want to see the extended pedigrees of these animals. It's simply no way to start a herd.

    Yes I do breed son to dam, dauther back to sire or grandsire, and even a full sister/full brother mating this year, the difference it's planned, I know the bloodlines very well (some I have been dealing with for 15 years, and wanted to condense down that genepool of my two best udders this year. I also will not be selling them to some unsuspecting person, they will stay here, and hopefully become showstring hopefulls.

    If you do purchase the does, have another ND breeder help you find a good buck for next year that will improve these does, not just get them bred. Vicki
     
  7. Lrose

    Lrose Well-Known Member

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    We have Nubians and have bred father to daughter with no problem. The offspring are always bred to an unrelated buck or go for meat. If you know nothing about the buck the two does were bred to I would raise the kids for meat and not breeding. Then when the does come in heat again breed to the best quality buck you can find. I wouldn't sell kids to unsuspecting buyers when you don't know their back ground.