line breeding?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by quikstring, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. quikstring

    quikstring Member

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    how far can u go with line breeding or is it just inbreeding??? I'm told that u can go with father and daughter and father with grand daughter. Just how far can u go?? Thanks
     
  2. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the first question you need to ask is how far can you go in culling. Line breeding concentrates good traits, but it does the same thing with bad traits. If you cannot rurhlessly cull inferior specimins then it doesn't matter what you breed.
     

  3. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i think you can go as long and far with inbreedining/linebreeding as you see healthy good growing progeny with no severe faults. father/daughter ,
    mother /son you double up on good and bad genes. this is the best way to find out what traits your animals have. you have to know your bloodlines.
     
  4. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    I plan to do a good bit of grandfather to granddaughter and grandmother to grandson breedings with my nigerians, but am afraid to breed any closer. I am mainly doing this because there are very few nigerians in our area and we only have two unrelated bucks and five does of which some are related. Will let you know in a couple of years how things are progressing. :)
     
  5. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    some people have said up to 7 or 8 generations with goats but i dont know of any hard facts to support this,

    the advice about CULLING is VERY GOOD advice, you can breed any animal to any animal regardless of how closely or not they are related but if you are not prepaired to Cull Responcibly and ONLY keep the BEST you dont need to be breeding anything, you need to cull anytime you are breeding to replace or expand your breeding herd. the good thing is you can always eat the Culls.
    if you have an exceptional Buck or Doe and want to increase the amount of thoughs traites in your herd the quickest way to do that is to breed that animal back to its Daughters or sons, and then you can also breed brother to sister to help consentraight the good points, just remimber to CULL and CULL some more till you only are keeping the very best.

    Line breeding works well because you can essentially breed same line multiple ways and cross these to keep things vigours but not loosing your hard work by bringing in a wild card
     
  6. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    When an animal has more than 50% of it's genetics fromanotheranimal,it's inbreeding. When it's less than that, it's linebreeding.

    Whether either one works or not (and the same could be said of any breeding plan or lack of breeding plan for that matter) depends on your goals, culling or lack of it, and your strategy. You simply cannot haphazardly breed animals together for several generations and expect to come up with something good, even if they're the best ones in the country.
     
  7. kerrinatoz

    kerrinatoz Well-Known Member

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    With Nigerians, I've noticed many breeders ship quite willingly. You may want to consider getting a buckling sent to you?? I know there are many great Texas lines and my doe's sire is out of Alaska at Silveraurora. (http://www.silveraurora.com/ndforsale.html) It only costs a bit extra to ship. Worth a thought anyway.

    Kerrin
     
  8. kerrinatoz

    kerrinatoz Well-Known Member

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    So here's a question, if you have a known fault that you want to stay away far away from, is it true that you have to saty far away from line breeding? The fault in the lines will only appear more if you match say granddaughter with grandfather? I have a fault in the lines that I'm trying to stay far away from. My girls' sire was found with a third teat and destroyed. They are unproven at this time as we are not in milk yet. They also have excellent genetics for large milk supplies for Nigerians. They are really beautiful they have so much to offer but I do want to make sure that we don't see this again? Any advice?
     
  9. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    If you want to eliminate a bad trait, thats where the culling comes in . DO NOT breed the ones that show the trait. and keep those that only show the good traits. Eventually the gene will be eliminated. Most "breeds" of all domesticated animals were created through inbreeding. Its not necessarily a bad thing if done with some thought and control. You can always do an outcrossing later to get new genes in the pool, but youll already have your main traits set
     
  10. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You don't want to breed a goat carrying the gene for extra teats to a relative. I have a dairy doe who is lovely in every way except for having four teats. I have bred her to unrelated bucks, including a Boer buck and all the kids had two teats. In 05, I bred her to her half brother's son. One of the doelings was born with three teats. She (the doeling) was sold to a pet home. This year, I once again bred my doe to an unrelated buck. If you are wondering why I keep a four teated doe - she's out of excellent bloodlines, she's my most productive milker and she's hubby's pet.
     
  11. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    Bad traits are always present to some degree. There are slight defects and severe ones. Cull animals that show severe defects or extreme degrees of a fault, for example, an animal so hocky that its hocks rub together with every step, but not one that's only slightly hocky. And never, if you can help it,breed two animals with the same fault together, related or not.
     
  12. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    The gene for extra teats is recessive. Each and every offspring of an animals with extra teats will carry that gene, whether it has extra teats or not. Just something to be aware of.
     
  13. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    http://kinne.net/heritcht.htm

    Here is an excellent site that shows you the heritability of some traits in goats. Information you need to know when linebreeding. Vicki