Lilacs

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by fordson major, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    has any one had any luck growing them from sprigs? was told that you just threw the cut stems on the ground and covered litly with soil . well has not worked! do lilacs produce a toxin that will not alow them to sprout ? trying to get some growing over the old farm "dump"were they used to grow,well still grow just not in this area. have tryed the layer method else were with similar results. area grows grass and weeds fine!other than cat litter and wood ash nothing"dumped" since 1945!
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I have started them. Used sharp builder's sand dampened with willow tea. You might want to mulch your tree to improve the soil around it too.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Lilacs here spread like crazy from the suckers. As cyngbaeld mentions it's pretty easy to get these to root in damp sand. I've done it by shoving the sucker in milk carton, once you see the budding and leaf growth cut slits in the milk carton (not the plastic milk cartons, but the waxed cardboard ones) and put in a hole in the ground having potting or loose soil, composted manure and let it get established. This works well for suitable suckering bush plants such as currants also.
     
  4. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    soil at this site is very rich! by farm dump meant the area were they dumped the kitchen scraps! some old tin and busted glass also this site is were the septic tank got emptied and covered. what is willow tea?steeped willow leaves? will try sand come spring would like to get some new growth as the old lilac is starting to die out!
     
  5. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    Ford, I think that idea of starting lilacs with sprigs in the dirt was a pie-in-the-sky plan...wouldn't it be nice if it were that easy. If you check around the base of your lilac bush in the early spring, there will be little shoots starting up, and you can dig these shoots...(the lilacs spread this way) and replant them, even if you have to damage some of the root. You might want to try getting as many as possible so you have some room for failure, and also, the more you put together, the sooner the bush will get big. This is the only successful method I've tried. kathy
     
  6. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i think saying that you just stomp on them, is another way of saying they are easy to start. and they are. but you got to do it the right way. take cuttings during the winter/ early spring, when they are dormant. if you plant them in damp sand or loose soil, about half of them will sprout and make new plants.

    the way i do it is, get your cutting (from about any kind of shrub or tree). take the cutting from new side shoots of the plant, about 6 inches long. at home, i dip them in root tone (a powerful rooting hormone- avoid breathing/ handling it, and wash well after) and plant them, with one "bud" or "node" bneath the dampened soil. take the whole tray and stick it inside a big plastic garbage bag, and seal it shut. i use scraps of 4 mil plastic i have laying around. in a day or two, you will notice that it is like a mini-greenhouse. be patient. depending on the type of tree or shrub, it may take a few months to see any new growth. when you have a good root system going, transplant it to a new pot, and then tend like any other sapling. i keep them in pots for at least the first year, until they are strong enough to live outside on their own.