Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help from anyone who knows about LGDs. I am considering going to MO to get one of ozark_jewels puppies, but there are some drawbacks:

Driving to MO. about 1000 miles.
LGD would be a puppy, how long do I have to wait before it can protect?

And some advantages:

I know what I'm getting, from a good breeder, support.
I can train the pup from the day it gets here, might be a better LGD in the long run.

But there is another option:

Disadvantages:
I don't know the dog's history. I do know what the current owner says about the dog..?
What if it doesn't work out? I need a LGD.

Advantages:
Only in Denver, about 3 hours drive.
Already 1 year old, can guard from day 1.
Would be rescuing, vs buying from a breeder.

So here is the info on the dog being rehomed in Denver.
I don't think she has been raised with anything, However she is a good natured gentle dog, and is good with my crew, kids, horses, chickens, cats, and rabbits. I do not believe the lady I bought her from was totally honest, so not sure on age or shots. They told me she was 6 mths old and up to date on shots, she is closer to a year and I doubt you could get her into a vets office for anything ??? I have tried to make her a family pet but can not get her in the house, she sleeps outside and always on the look out. Nothing gets past her. She leaves my yard when let loose and now my pup is following her. I live on a street where it would be easy for them to get hit so she is doomed to the dog yard with nothing to do. I really think she needs a job and would be good at it.

I really need to make the right decision. I need a LGD that will protect my chickens (I have lost 10+ to foxes) and rabbits, which I hope to have pastured next season. I also have goats but they have never been bothered by any wild things. The dog MUST be friendly to people, and friendly to dogs, but not to the extent of allowing them to hurt livestock. MUST be able to stay outdoors with livestock in all weather conditions (it gets to -30 plus windchill sometimes)

I did try emailing Emily for advice but she hasn't gotten back to me yet, and i would like some extra input anyway. Plus if I do decide to go with the Denver dog, I don't have forever to make a choice.

WWYD? Thanks for your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
she is a good natured gentle dog, and is good with my crew, kids, horses, chickens, cats, and rabbits. I have tried to make her a family pet but can not get her in the house, she sleeps outside and always on the look out. Nothing gets past her.
Is this a rescue or just a person who is housing this dog? A good rescue will take the dog back if it does not work out. I have now had two rescues that have worked as LGDs for me. If this person is honest about the description of this dog, it sounds like she might make a great LGD. She sounds a lot like my current Pyr. He will not go indoors unless 2 of us pick him up and "wheelbarrow" him in! Fortunately my vet will come outside to do most of his vetting. He's great with the other dogs (as long as they don't pick a fight with him - he never instigates, but he will end it if need be), great with kids, great with all the critters and he makes sure the world knows that he is on duty! Rescues can make great LGDs as long as you ask enough questions and get the right dog. Personally, this one sounds like she has good potential. Just ask a lot of questions. Do make sure you have good fences!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I believe she is someone who got the dog in the hope of having a family pet and it isn't working out because the dog is acting too much like a LGD. Not a true rescue, but the dog needs a new home and will probably end up in rescue or in a shelter unless it gets one. I guess if it doesn't work out I can always try to RH the dog myself, but then I won't have a LGD at ALL, not even a puppy who I have to wait till it grows up for it to guard.
 

·
Enabler!
Joined
·
3,865 Posts
I drove way far south near Trindad to get two "trained" LGDs. They were 5 months old and 8 months old and let me tell you they are nightmares!! She charges the goats, kills and eats my chickens let's no one touch her but me, he is a big idiot who thinks it is fun to pin chickens to the ground and lick them and carry them around in his mouth. These guys were raised with other LGDs, goats, horses and some poultry. They are both so useless and cost me time to keep trying to train them and a small fortune to feed. Just the other day since they have to be kept penned, allowed a coyote to run off with one of my chickens. I chased him not them. If I would have let them out they would have been on the rest of the chickens and helped him!
They did have puppies and I am raising them from day one to accept the cats, goats and chickens. These two share water with the chickens, get butted and stepped on by goats and do get into the trash and make a mess :) they are already 50 percent better than there parents and are 8 weeks old.

My cons are:
She really has no idea of her history, she might be good at guarding or she could turn out to be a nightmare. Is she bonded to humans or the animals?
Why can she not go to a vet? Is she unmanagable in some way? Her running off is a big con to me as well since she does not stay with the livestock.

Pros:
Emily on the other hand raises actual livestock dogs and I would jump to get one of hers. But the distance also stops me. If you look at her threads and pictures of her goats and dogs and etc you can see that they are all well cared for and look very healthy. So you know what you are getting.

You can ask to have the year old dog for a week trial and see if that works out and if it does not you can return her and go see Emily.... and while you are there bring me back a puppy and a couple of goats, lol. I am sure she is busy and will get back to you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
I personally would look at the older one before a puppy. Do a search on the forum and see how many people are trying to get their Great Pyrenees pup to stop killing chickens on here. I wouldn't trust a puppy a lone with chickens till its well past the playful puppy stage. Traditionally puppies are left with the livestock they are going to protect to bond with them. Well chickens aren't as hardy as a cantankerous ewe or goat that would have no problem knocking a pup into place if it got too playful. If the older dog is safe with chickens and rabbits it would be well worth the drive in my opinion. Ask to see it around the rabbits and chickens. Your observing the dog in its own territory, it shouldn't behave much differently at your place once settled in. Keep in mind that almost all LGD have a tendency to roam so you will need a good fence even if you start with a puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
I can vouch for Emily's puppies!

I bought my 2 girls when they were 6 months from Emily. They are a little over a year now.

The only trouble I've had out of them is the occasional idea to roam when they thought we were asleep... and that wasn't entirely their fault.
I'd been free ranging my goats, and I have 3 trouble-making kids and 1 herd queen out of my 7 goats, who likes to sneak to the neighbors alfalfa field. The dogs naturally started following them to round them up and bring them back home (which I've watched with mouth dropped open)... I guess it started the problem. After penning in the goats, the dogs decided they could still roam around when we weren't watching.
HECK, we didn't even KNOW they were roaming until a neighbor came over to complain...
I thought they were always at home, because they were always at the front door whenever I went outside, and there is always someone here during the day, so it was pretty much a shock to find out they were doing that.

They are in pens now and do a VERY good job of watching over the goats in there. I really do hate that, but the neighbors have threatened and I don't want to lose them.
We are working on getting our whole place fenced in eventually.. so one day it won't be a problem.

I have free-ranging chickens too and haven't lost one to predators since their arrival.

They also do not eat much at all! I think Emily must breed the kind that survives from air. The chickens are always stealing their food and they let them. Grrrrrr... ^_~ They are also partially RAW fed, and they still do not mess with the animals!!!
They get about 1 lb of kibble a day if we get low of fresh meat, and the chickens eat half of that I'm sure.

They are also really smart... I've been able to teach them some things that help me work with the animals. They naturally rounded up the goats and made them stay at home, so I worked with their talents and had them learn key words to help me catch strays and things.

I've never had a problem with them around any of our animals... goats and kids, duck, chickens, min-pin, horses, rabbits (yes, have had PLENTY get loose), cats, and my 2 little kids.

Emily's puppies are the best working/family dogs I've ever had! They are great with the kids and do not jump up on them. That was one of my biggest worries! In fact, they let the kids love and cuddle all over them and they never so much as step on their toes.

I would say the distance is worth it for them. Doing a trial with the rescue is a good idea, but if it were me... knowing what I know about Emily's dogs... I would just get the puppy!

Cricket
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the advice- she is willing to let us do a trial run and see how things work out so that is what we're going to do. She really does sound like she will be a great guardian dog, I'm just leery about getting an older dog who may not bond with the livestock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
Thanks for all the advice- she is willing to let us do a trial run and see how things work out so that is what we're going to do. She really does sound like she will be a great guardian dog, I'm just leery about getting an older dog who may not bond with the livestock.
Personally, I'd worry less about bonding than the natural guarding tendency. The dog does not need to bond with his/her charges, he/she just needs to not kill them and needs to protect the area they live in. As long as the dog does not bother the chickens and protects the area around them, they will be taking care of the problem. Problems can arise when a LGD goes after a perceived problem such as an animal giving birth in distress and the dog might attack what it perceives as the problem and/or the dog correcting an adult animal from mating or caring for the offspring. A trial run sounds like a good option!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top