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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
LGD puppies - Available January - expecting litter of 10-12 pups.

Anatolian/Akbash/Great Pyrenees/Maremma

For those of you who are not familiar with LGD's, below is a bit of information.

These are ancient breeds that have been around for 1000's of years as working dogs,
protecting and living with Sheep and Goats 24/7.

Mixture of breed intentional to be used as Livestock Guard Dog of Goats & Sheep only - Not Chickens. They work better in pairs, one dog can not fend off a pack of dogs or coyotes/cougar/bear etc.
Pups will need training initially and socializing, old school thinking with LGD's is to throw
out with livestock and never handle. This dosn't work and causes problems down the road,they are smart and love affection and will guard with their life and will need introduction to livestock to guard/bond at proper age on acreage as well as their handler. They do require good fencing, they are known to guard flocks on 100's of acres, so learning their territory is important. These dogs will not do well in the city. They bark to ward off any new possible threat to property, livestock within their perceived territory.

These dogs are intelligent and independent which makes them unique to guard out on there own with livestock. They initially bark to warn off a threat, and will only attack if threatened. Saving your livestock from predators.

Please read up on the breeds as to understand their unique qualities as guard dogs prior to calling.
They do not herd but will round up to protect, they do not roam if you neuter or spay and they have a job. Fiercely loyal to their owners/flock. They will need shots/worming/rabies shots at proper age.

My last litter I gladly sold to good owners, one not so good, hence the reason I'm detailing breed knowledge. Will send pics of previous pups.


Price $600
510-695-1153
 

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hillbilly farmgirl
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They do not herd but will round up to protect, they do not roam if you neuter or spay and they have a job.
I feel like you should amend that to include the fact that LGD's need good, solid fencing as well.

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your farm, and not just what you are trying to sell us? Can we get to know you a little better? Where are you from?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Shannon, Sorry, new to this. Just thought people with livestock might need a dog, as for us, here goes....

We live in Calaveras County on 40acres which is close to the foothills in California. We are currently preparing to (God Willing) raise sheep and a goats, we only have one area that needs fencing in the back that will enable us to open up for more grazing land, currently only about 15 acres are fully fenced and 3/4 of the rest which is mostly hills and valley. I knew it would be unused until we could properly fence and have protection, hence the reason I have LGD's. There are packs of coyotes, bobcats, and I'm told a cougar was seen with cubs awhile back as well as alot of other wildlife. Two years ago we purchased a LGD female (Anatolian/Akbash/Maremma/Great Pyrenees cross) and bred her to a Anatolian that is proven to guard goats 24/7. I knew it would be foolish to have any livestock on our land without proper protection. I started researching breeds and discoved LGD's. Anyway, we've lived her coming on two years which have mostly been clean up, as the prior residence thought the land was their garbage disposal, to this day, I still find nails, wire, glass, you name it. I've had huge pit fires in the winter to get rid of trees, junk thrown everywhere, and it's finally sheep/goat worthy, just the fencing is left. Everything has been a journey in life excepting nature and not fighting it, it's hard work, but I love it. The hard part of ranch life is the reality of death, I've already lost quite a few chickens, had to slaughter the pigs. Pigs were my initial choice to raise, but I found out real quick, it's not for me. We currentlly have three horses, 8 chickens, 6 dogs.

With most of the land out of sight from the house it's almost impossible to know what goes on unless we go back by ATV. So the more dogs, the more they can work together. The dogs are currently roaming to learn their territory within the fenced acreage, the next step is to introduce there herd this spring in a enclosed paddock. I have all three males neutered and things have been great, the two females and one lil jack russel cross are lined up for spaying. This will be my females last litter. I've researched sheep breeds and have decided on Katahdins. If all goes well we will also raise Babydoll Southdowns, closer to the house in paddocks. I'm not fussed about the goats, as they are more to clear shrub. I will only get ewes and one ram, cull as we go.
 

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hillbilly farmgirl
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Welcome, Vetty! I'm from California as well, although quite a ways north of you. You seem a lot like the rest of us here. Do your dogs do a good job of protecting the poultry? A good poultry dog can be hard to find, LGD or not. Training the dogs for poultry protection and marketing them as such might just be a win for you. Of course, they do always go through a puppy phase and have to be reinforced regularly, especially with chickens.

It sounds like you have, or have had enough stock already to make the dogs work for your intended purposes. I have seen some city-raised Pyrenees that are TERRIBLE around animals of all sorts, though-- I have always heard they need to be raised around the livestock they are guarding for it to work.

I keep 1 Pyr mix, and she needs to stay locked up with either the cow or the goats because she wanders far and wide. From my own experience, spaying her did no good, lol. But, she is good with even the chickens, nice to children, she is a good dog but hard to keep home.

Good luck on your journey!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! All the dogs have been great with the chickens, but the mother did go thru a chicken phase, I had to tie her up for months until she got it, never touched one after that, then her daughter who was raised with my free ranging messy chickens started in and plucked my beautiful rooster and a hen, I thought they were dead, but Thank God I came home just in the knick of time and put them in the coop and they survived, more shocked then anything. Shes a good dog, but I don't trust anymore and I'm not willing to find out, so all up, I rather people didn't think they could guard chickens, the rest were fine, never touched them. But I also lost some to a bobcat out back where the dogs couldn't go, so I keep them locked in the coup, which has actually made life easier, no chicken poops all over. lol. I want to build a bigger coup and start raising meat chickens soon. The dogs are amazing in that they won't even let a Hawk, Volture or any large bird land on our property, they will chase them away barking when there in flight, as well as rabbits, squirrels, coyotes, stray dogs (almost killed one!). The mother actually warned us when there was a very large Rattle snake trying to come through our fence into the chicken coop, Thank God we were able to see it and kill it before it came over. I also have bird netting around fence, so it was stuck.Another good thing about alot of dogs running around is it keeps the snakes away, and believe me, I prayed there wouldn't be anymore on our property, we've killed 8 just this year, now that they are larger and running around, haven't seen one. I can't say enough about life on a ranch, loving it.
 

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for years, I had raised purebred Maremma LGD.
lots of what you say is true, I have to add that they are excellent chicken/other fowl guardians..
I have no fences. I did have a bout with my males taking it upon themselves to include the neighbors' property as their domain.
we have retired our geriatric female from having pups. sold both males.. with her being alone, she does not wander.. we got rid of all living things except her. now she regards us as her (two people) herd.. If I am outside, she is with me. If I am inside, she is with me.. Yes, she has access into the house whenever she feels like coming in..
very well behaved in the house as were all of the rest of our dogs.. we can leave meat on the table or kitchen counter and they never take anything off of the table .. our male would not even eat off of a dinner plate..
one of our last puppies went to live with chickens, and a miniature horse and a shetland pony. we still receive updates about him. he is doing a great job where he is..
......jiminwisc.......
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thats great to know, I guess the Maramma is better with chicken/fowl. I'm told Anatolians aren't so good with chickens, so I've learned with mine as well. I keep three of the dogs in at night, the rest outside, normally their mom, but for now she stays in a warm cellar to give birth soon, with a small fenced area, she dosn't want to leave, she's getting very protective of her "space" now, so I've separated her from the other dogs. With my dogs being mixed LGD breeds, it's really interesting to see the unique traits in each one according to breed description. Two look pure Anatolian (one even has double dew claws), the other looks pure Pyrenees and one looks pure Akbash. But there is one thing I've absolutely love about all of them, they are polite in nature. I've had alot of breeds in the past, from Labs to English Mastiff to mutts, and I truly appreciate the LGD nature which is very gentle towards humans they are raised with. Before we moved to our ranch, We had one dog that I was told was Anatolian cross, we got him from the pound, a rescue, but he wasn't, boy were they wrong, he was a nightmare, I raised him as a pup, socialized him, thought he would make a great ranch guard dog, but in less then two months of living on the ranch, he killed the neighbors goat to our horror, we couldn't apologize enough and pay for vet bill, then were told later a calf was killed at my neighbors. He escaped alot, I was fixing fences, filling gaps, picking him up from neighbors, the pound, paying $$$ for that dogs mischief. I couldn't do anything to keep him in other then tie him up, let off he was off and running, but I just couldn't believe he killed the calf, until the goat was killed, now I know he did it. That dog put grey hair on my head, it was horrible. He was tired up from then on until I found him a home, I was so pissed I wanted to put him down, but couldn't do it, so I had to find another home. He also destroyed everything within paw/jaw reach, it was so much work cleaning what he destroyed, turns out, he was more Belgian Melnoise and suffered from separation anxiety, left alone for anytime he went nuts. He now lives in town and is doing great as a guard, companion being close to his people 24/7. He's perfect there. When he left, I couldn't believe how much peace I had and less work cleaning up things he destroyed, the worry of him getting out. Lesson one on ranch life, have the right breed for your purpose. I'll let people know, if there looking for a chicken/fowl guard to consider pure Maremmas. Thats good to know, thank you!
 
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