Letting someone keep sheep at your place....?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mountaineer, Jun 4, 2006.

  1. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    An acquaintence MAY be bringing some sheep (12) and a llama over here for the summer. They have their own portable fence and what not, just need my water.
    I've never done this, what sorts of things would you consider before taking it on??
    Thanks!!
     
  2. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    Will the owners show up daily to feed their animals and check there condition?
     

  3. Looking4ewes

    Looking4ewes Well-Known Member

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    I think it's a GREAT idea! I'm looking for someone just like you in Michigan. :)
     
  4. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Good stuff here! Liability is huge. The owners will be taking full care, however this will need discussing. Thanks for the ideas.
     
  5. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    Laws are different in every state. Talking to a lawyer may cost you a small fee today but you may need a lawyer to help when it is to late.

    You better get it in writing because if one get out and gets hit by a car they will sue you for having it in your care.

    Being a friend is one thing but loosing your home over a law suit because of a wreck cause by one of these sheep and someone is killed or crippled for the rest of there live can cost you for ever.

    What if they all get out and go and cause damage to other peoples property ?

    This has happened many times ! ! !

    bumpus.
     
  6. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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  7. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Is this something that is normally payed for?
     
  8. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    Some people do charge and some don't charge.

    It's your grass and it is up to you. :shrug:

    bumpus
    .
     
  9. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If something bad happens, you as the land owner will be named in the lawsuit. (critter gets out & causes damage, or car crash, etc.) Even if it's his fence, it's just automatic your name as land owner (another person with $$$$ we can try to blame is what the lawyer will see.....) will be named.

    Talk to your insurance agent. Get some coverage that they will cover you - so they will be the ones doing the lawyering on your behalf. Else you could be the one in 100,000 that loses it all for some freak accident. Now you can't cover the animals - but you need to be protected from liability.

    Something in writing on who is responsible for what is a good idea. Likely no big issue, but putting it down in writing makes both sides aware of things never thought of - if the well goes dry & the critters die, is that your fault because you are supplying water, or theirs because they didn't check the wateres for 4 days..... Etc. Becomes just a nice heads-up.

    The llama is the security force, so I would say any critter loss should _not_ be your problem. Llama not doing his job.....

    Discuss things like that.

    Some folks are happy to have their grass mowed for them & don't charge if they had no other plans for the land; some want like maybe up to 20 cents per head per day. For me it would depend if I needed to tend to them at all - would be a deciding factor if I needed to spend any time on this, moreso than the use of the land. Your milage may certainly vary. :) Maybe a few bucks a month for the electricity - pump & fencer?

    --->Paul
     
  10. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You might want to consider renting the land to them for a very small fee, just to cover the electricity. This makes them tenants and responsible. And, of course, get everything in writing.
     
  11. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    I'd be concerned about what kind of portable fence they plan on using, in addition to the liability issues already mentioned. If it's portable electronet fencing, are they using a solar charger, or a plug-in one? Because the solar chargers really aren't hot enough to keep sheep (or goats) confined inside the electronet, as I know from several years experience with the stuff.

    Kathleen
     
  12. ovsfarm

    ovsfarm Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Definitely consider all the above regarding liability. Sheep get out. It's what they do. They think it is their job and God-given right. Also consider who would be liable if their llama stomps someone's expensive/lost/trespassing coon hound into a grease spot in your pasture, or spits at the cute little neighbor girl who's wearing her Sunday best. And by the way, electric fence does not do all that great a job of holding sheep, in my experience. They have only about a two inch in diameter target on the end of their noses where the power actually zaps them. All that wool is an incredible insulator. We have seen our guys lean on the electric fence wire to get at a tasty morsel on the other side.

    If the sheep get tangled in the fence, are you supposed to get them out? If a limb falls off a wild cherry tree into the pasture and they eat it and die, are you responsible? In the event of an emergency, who evacuates the animals?

    If you do decide to do it, I would suggest that you set up a specific trial period to see how it works. At the end of which either of you could cancel the arrangement without hard feelings. And be sure to include in any written agreement provisions for how to end the relationship.

    We allowed someone to put cattle on our land for a while and he paid us in beef or pork from his farm. That was a great deal for us, but he eventually had to pull them out because another neighbor who owned the loading and unloading area made that inaccessible and our "tenant" was no longer able to easily move his cattle in and out (he was 83 and not quite able to chase them around our more open pastures!).
     
  13. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Consider your gardens and landscaping, too. They're notorious for being difficult to keep fenced.