Lehman's High wheel cultivator..........

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by dave85, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    Anyone use one in this age of garden tractors, rototillers?

    How is the quality of the tool?
    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  2. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know about the Lehrman's one, but we have a high wheel cultivator and find it doesn't really fit with how we do things. It isn't good for raised beds unless you walk on them which kind of defeats the purpose and it doesn't work well on heavy, clay soil which is what we have in the field beds. I hang on to it beause I think when all the field beds have a good tilth it will be usefull.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    In the past I have used a high wheeled cultivator in addition to modern cultivating tools. I felt that I could get closer to the crop and have better control since I was pushing the unit. It is much faster than a hoe and the latter can be used to finish cleaning up the row if and as needed.

    I'm not sure if the Lehman unit is aluminum or not, but I feel that some weight would be necessary to do a better job. Just like the aluminum framed push seeders---often too light in weight to work properly, at least in my soil.
     
  4. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    We have an ancient Planet Jr., it was my Grandfathers, we use it for weeding between rows, it's all metal and I agree weight makes a difference. I think it's pretty handy to have around, I bet you could find one pretty cheap at a garage sale.
     
  5. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    Not many tools in garage sales here.
    Just trying to get some stuff put by for when we move to MO.
    Dave
     
  6. Ed K

    Ed K Well-Known Member

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    Dave,

    I have an old highwheel wheel hoe that belonged to my dad when he was a boy. I really prefer a low wheel hoe since it's much easier to use. The low wheel allows you to put the force more toward the ground as opposed to the high wheel type.

    The one I see in catalogs (such as Johnny's Selected Seeds) is manufactures by Glaser (formerly Real) and is about $300. Extra attachments are about $100 each. Real makes a cheaper version but not much cheaper.

    I recently purchased the Maxadyne Wheel Hoe For about $150 or so. I'm pretty happy with the hoe itself but I think the attachments are a tad bit lightweight. I bent the tip of the weeder already.

    While my dream would be to be in raised beds eventually. I have Corn and potatos in rows and this makes weeding and hilling up go a lot easier.

    Best Wishes

    http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?scommand=search&search=wheel+hoe&item=9090
     
  7. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    I have never personaly used or seen the lehmans high wheel, but the ergonomics look good from the picture, wood and steel would be better than aluminum. Lehmans products are built to be used, I think it would be a good investment. As far as busting through clay, in the spring when the ground is moist a wheel hoe glides through the soil, weekly cultivation keeps the soil loose and weeds down clear through harvest. Dried packed clay in July is like trying to till pavement, our tractor won't even do it. Good luck with the move.
     
  8. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    I bought one this winter to use in our garden. I bought it for something to help out. I didn't know how much it helps. It turns the weeding and row plowing into a fraction of time. My only bad remark is that the plow and row metal pieces are alittle flimsy. I have to rebend mine. Alot. It isn't made to move limestone rock out of the way. But for weeds and plowing in clay and sand it's the best I have found. When I get my welder put in I will make a new plow and row maker. Along with a box spreader for my fourwheeler.
     
  9. dave85

    dave85 dave85

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    Decided to order today. Catalogue said " USA made". Online said "imported".
    So I called and the clerk said the manufacturer had changed, she thought China.
    So, I need to rethink this.
    Dave
     
  10. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    Well that figures, if it's made in China i wouldn't buy it, in fact if you are moving you might just hold off until you get to MO check out the garage sales, flea markets, and junk shops along the way I'll bet you find an old one like mine. Mine is cast iron with round brass or bronze knobs on the end of the handles so it's easy on the hands. The blades are heavy steel the don't bend. A neighbor of mine over the hill pulled one out of a truck full of junk headed for the dump. You'll find one, trust me, the more out in the country you get the easier these things are to find. Good luck.