laundry trouble

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Snugglebunny, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    Okay - my washer broke awhile ago, but my dryer still works. I bought a "Wonder wash" from Lehman's and it just arrived Friday, but it still leaves clothes too wet for the dryer.

    I am running out of places to dry my laundry!

    I have a covered, glassed in porch, but there's not enough circulation, even with a fan the clothes are still damp by morning.

    I have a full basement, but it smells like a basement - even with a fan the clothes come out musty smelling. The cat boxes are down there too.

    I have a full open garage.

    And of course the bathrooms don't get circulation either. The rest of the house is hardwood flooring, and i don't want to have laundry dripping all over the place.

    And of course there's the line outside, b ut the weather is turning colder and rainier.

    What should I do?
     
  2. Salmonberry

    Salmonberry Registered Nut

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    A clothes wringer might help.

    Salmonberry
     

  3. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    I know but I can't afford one - they're like $100 or more!!
     
  4. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You're talking about the little handcranked washer?
    Have someone else- child - husband whatever- grab one end of something and you grab the other and twist in opposite directions. Then hang. Or roll up stuff in a BIG towel after a single person wringing- and kneel on it to get all water out. That leaves you with a damp article and a wet towel, however.
    I find it easiest in a stch like this to do just a few pieces daily. Less damp laundry in a house seems to dry quicker.
    I feel for you- I live in the HUMID south. BTDT
     
  5. magnolia2017

    magnolia2017 Well-Known Member

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    Are there any older people in your area that may have one of the old handcranked wringers stored away that you could borrow? You could try an antique store as I bought one a few years ago in good shape for under $20, but I've also seen them have ridiculous prices too.

    I use a wringer washer and if I can't hang them outside I use a combination of the dryer and drying racks. Towels take a long time to dry and I generally hang them on the drying racks overnight and throw them in the dryer the next morning. I do the same thing with blue jeans though I do try to dry outside when possible.

    Maggie
     
  6. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    Could you return your "wonder wash" to them and look for a "regular" wringer washer. Often times you can buy them used from the local newspapers or ask around at your local senior citizens club. I love having one..saves on water and gives you time to "enjoy" your laundry days. I know what you mean about hanging clothes during the winter months. I used my wooden amish made clothes dryer through the winter and hang in the cellar with the woodstove. But usually still hang outside during the coldest days..clothes will dry..eventually.
     
  7. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    Mop bucket wringers work well too.

    Walmart sell's cheap versions for around $40

    The wringer looks pretty well made.

    Can't you hang them till they drip most of the water out then through in dryer to finish?

    Grandmother bear is right about having the kids help you wring the clothes.

    And it will teach them lasting lessons. My twenty somethings still remember having to go outside with me at 4-5 years old and chop and stack the wood. They wouldn't stay in the house by themselves , so they got drafted early in life.

    They remember having to keep the stove going when they were little to stay warm.

    Later in life in thir pre teens they asked me if we were rich, because we had everything we needed. It gave them a appreciation of what it takes to survive and live this life.

    Memories of work done to help the family survive are priceless lesson's that God is goinving you a chance to teach your children now.
     
  8. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What broke on the washer? If it wasn't the motor, maybe you could advance it to the spin cycle, and spin the water out.

    Also- sometimes vocational schools will repair broken appliances for you.

    Good Luck.




     
  9. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You could roll the clothes, one at a time, in towels to absorb the moisture. While the load is drying, hang the towels up.

    Do you have an attic? Before wringers and electric dryers, rich folk hung their laundry (the maid hung their laundry) on lines hung across the attic.
     
  10. paulaswolfpack

    paulaswolfpack Well-Known Member

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    I got my washer from home depot for $208 and dryer for $198
     
  11. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    I do most of my wash in a bucket. We have a washer and dryer, but the more I wash in a bucket the more I think of the washer and dryer as wasteful, noisy and inefficient. Can't quite bring myself to sell them yet, though! And I really do just enjoy bucket washing things a bit at a time as needed.

    I'd love a good wringer, but those things are so expensive.

    I've started using an upside down bucket and an old sturdy plastic laundry basket as my wringer. I sort of fold a bit of the laundry so it fits on top of the bucket, put the laundry basket on top (upside down) and sit on it until I have pressed out as much water as possible. I usually do my wash out back on the cement porch, so the water just runs off into the garden. In the winter, I can do this in the tub.

    It works pretty well, and helps my rear end earn it's keep. :)

    Lynda
     
  12. Salmonberry

    Salmonberry Registered Nut

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    What a great idea wvpeach! I think I'll file that one away. [strongbad


    Salmonberry
     
  13. KindredSpirit

    KindredSpirit Well-Known Member

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    Could you send back the one at Lehman's and pick up a washer out of the classifieds, freecycle, or craiglist? I would especially check freecycle. People usually just give away washers that are older. I had a washer that was 20 years old and still working great, left it with the house when we moved.

    Edited to ad: I almost forgot. You might also check estate auctions.
     
  14. KindredSpirit

    KindredSpirit Well-Known Member

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  15. PATRICE IN IL

    PATRICE IN IL Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You could try a salad spinner for smaller items like socks and undergarments to remove the extra water. You could also try putting something like a single shirt into a collander and pressing on it with a pot to push the water through the collander. Just a couple of ideas, hope they help.
    Patrice