Last Year's Garden - What would have done differently?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by donsgal, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    I am passing the cold weather by perusing some of the 2006 seed catalogs that we have been getting in the mail the past few days and planning next year's garden!

    Thinking over this year's faux pas, (planting dill and carrots close together being the worst of them). I am wondering if any of you would like to share those learning experiences that we all encounter from time to time regarding your garden.

    Maybe if we share our boo boos then somebody else won't make the same ones next year....

    donsgal
     
  2. Bink

    Bink Well-Known Member

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    Direct sow. We started a lot of plants inside last year (partly because the landscaping wasn't done), and they didn't do so well transplanted. We'll sow 'em directly into the ground this year.
     

  3. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Only thing that produced was the 'maters.Planting lots more next year.That was BooBoos' boo boo.

    BooBoo
     
  4. silentcrow

    silentcrow Furry Without A Clue

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    What would I do different? Actually put a garden in! :eek: I wanted to put one in, but never found the time to get my grandpaps tiller tinkered with. I don't know when it was last started up.
     
  5. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm. This will be the 6th year in this garden. You'd think I'd have it figured out by now :eek: !
    It's gotten smaller and smaller, next year it'll get bigger and bigger!!!!!!!!!
    Still gotta figure out what's up with the root crop situation, can't grow taters wortha darn! (all tops and no bottoms) and then I'll start cold loving stuff earlier, like beans and brussels sprouts.
    Move the strawberries to a patch of their own, and God love me, I shall create edible lettuce !!!!!

    Don't plant too many tomatoes and Cukes...they rot on the ground making you feel terribly guilty and the chickens and ducks don't eat them! :(
     
  6. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    P.S. Roma tomatoes don't make for good Salsa! :p
     
  7. romancemelisa

    romancemelisa Well-Known Member

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    It was our first year here,and God forbid we ever move again, but if we do I will follow the direction of the sun for a season. I thought I had a good location this year, it was, till the trees across the street filled in and I never got any sun, pulled everything up in Aug. and moved it up the road to our new place and it has done great
     
  8. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    Actually plant one, this year :(
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i wouldn't have bought the potting soil i did to start my plants. i should have mixed my own. evrything seemed ok but i suspect too much nitrogen. they grow on top but had very few roots, many died during transplant.

    i choose to purchase a plant starting soil as i thought it would give me a "leg up". i blame the lousy soil i bought. it contained lots of incinerated debris (from big city trash no doubt). i actually found what i think were bits of shingle or tar paper that was not totally incinerated. next year i will mix my own soil for starting plants.
     
  10. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    I will be sure to plant the bell peppers in buckets next time.

    One of the few things planted in the ground were bell peppers. So along comes the first hard freeze, and I easily moved the tomatoes to shelter but the bell peppers were immovable. And they were still LOADED with fruits. And the next day it warmed up again. :(
     
  11. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    I'Ve been getting the same itch. I don't know how I would get through winter without seed catalogs.

    Lets see, this years lesson learned about our new place this year:

    1) My fall garden needs to be planted earlier. Beans were just about to produce when the frost got them

    2) I need to plant more bell peppers and fewer hot peppers....I will definately plant more bells, but fewer hots will require a level of self control I am not sure I have :)

    3) Plant smut resistant sweet corn (if there is such a thing). I seem to get a lot of it here.

    4)PLANT MORE ONIONS!!! I just used the last one from the basement.

    I am sure there are more...but thats the top of my list

    Shane
     
  12. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We are going to plant the speciality garlic in pots in Vancouver, because we couldn't get back to the garden in November. And now is froze to -30 several times real good.

    But Nancy's sister had esophagus cancer operation two weeks ago, and that's been going on for a while. So we have been visiting in a hospital in Seattle. So prayers are welcome.

    But next year in the fall we will make sure we get lots of garlic in for the following fall harvest.

    And since the peas were so great this year, and they fix nitrogen into the soil, we will move other root crops where they were last year and put the pes where they were. I think we will keep the potatoes in the same place as last year . . . what do you-all think?

    Alex
     
  13. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    We aren't changing anything except the peppers. This last summer we grew a mutt pepper from my parents seed collection. It was round, about the size of a half dollar, red, and medium hotness. I've already got some new seeds to try out that will be a bit more fun: Peter Peppers. They get their name from their... err... male-related shape. They're a bit hotter than the last ones, so maybe this time we won't have a problem with the kiddies stealing/eating them. Should be interesting.
     
  14. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    You could try growing them in a clean garbage can with compost materials. My parents did that one year (when we were in transition from one house to another) and we got loads of potatoes. Just fill the trash halfway with compost, plant your tater pieces, and make sure to keep layering more and more compost on as the greens come up. Then tip over the garbage can in the fall to harvest.

    Otherwise... could it be that your nitrogen is too high? Do you mulch in the fall?
     
  15. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    Mulch
    seperate the squash from the rest of the garden..
    More mulch
     
  16. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    Shoot them darn crows. Shoot them darn deer. Electrify the fence around the gardens, sooner. shadowwalker
     
  17. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Hey! I think I'll give the growing taters in a garbage can idea a whirl!

    Our property is surrounded by huge maple and other hardwood trees, they suck the life and water out of the soil :grump: ! I was thinking that because of all the fallen leaves that it's making the soil too alkaline (?) One year we raked and burned all those leaves in the fall, that seemed to help a bit! I've also added lots of pine shavings (from the hen house and bunny cages) that too seemed to help. But it dosen't last long.

    I've tried deep mulching with straw etc to keep moisture in and weeds down, again no succcess, the biggest tater i got last year was a little bigger than a golf ball, about half the plants had maybe 2 pot's on them, the rest none :shrug: (NO GRUBS OR BUGS!)
    I can maybe get a good deal on mushroom compost and thought if I run the taters (3 rows) straight down the center of the garden where there's the most sunlight perhaps that might work better and lay down some dripper hoses...?
    I've heard of people growing them right inside a bale of straw...has anyone ever tried that?
     
  18. Merrique

    Merrique Well-Known Member

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    Add more compost during the winter.
    Plant more sweet corn.
    Plant sweet potatoes again (they did wonderfully well).
    Plant more melons.
    Plant more sweet peppers.
    Fence in the garden.
     
  19. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I will plant the whole pack of zuccinni seeds. I got tons.
    I will space out the tomatoes more. I will plant more carrots and beets. I will buy full size corn this time. No more suger enhanced they don't grow big.

    So it seams I gotta make it bigger. :)
     
  20. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    Add machine gun turrets, concertina wire, and guard dogs to deal with the gosh darn woodchucks. Working on plans for more raised gardens surrounded by fencing. Going to add more variety too, especially root crops to hold over during the winter.