lasagna gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kidsnchix, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. kidsnchix

    kidsnchix Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone here ever used that gardening method ? I just saw a book called Lasagna Gardening and it looked pretty interesting.

    My dh and I are getting ready to move into a mobile home on top of a hill here in W. Arkansas and for anyone who's been here you know about the ROCKS ! We are not "spring chickens" so I don't want to spend a lot of time picking up rocks and trying to get in a garden, so was wondering if anyone liked this method.

    RoseKYTN
     
  2. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    When I moved to my new place two years ago I put in four beds with cinderblocks for walls. In the last bed I put in lasagna bed and thought no way will this work but it worked great. I was amazed at how good the soil in it is.
     

  3. karsan

    karsan Well-Known Member

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    Can you please explain what lasagne gardening is? I have heard about it, but would like some more info.
     
  4. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    Someone else probably has a link about it, but basically you put down layers of organic material, & grow directly in that instead of tilling. I do a version of it, I decide where I want a garden to grow, then put down old hay from the sheep barn (those wet mats from the bottom) which chokes out any grass/weeds, then dig out the old stuff from the chicken pens (hay, straw, droppings, etc.), water it down good, & in a month or so (preferably longer - like in the fall, but if you're using older stuff & the weather is warming it can work), when it's rotting down good, you can sort of rake the top layer a little & plant directly in the compost. Sometimes I then sprinkle a little old straw on top, to help hold in moisture. Since the mulch is higher than the surounding soil, it doesn't waterlog, yet it holds moisture in really well, in the amounts the plants need; I'm in a very dry summer climate, so this avoids frequent watering. Just add stuff every year, & you don't have to dig in it.
     
  5. kidsnchix

    kidsnchix Well-Known Member

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    The book is called "Lasagna Gardening" and its by Patricia Lanza.

    I think I'm going to give it a try. I'm not very familiar with raised beds, but I always worried about using them here in Ar. because it is so hot and dry here most summers, and where I use to live, I had no way of watering much.

    Thanks for all the info.
    RoseKYTN
     
  6. KelTech

    KelTech Guest

  7. karsan

    karsan Well-Known Member

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    Thank you very much!

    I just have a suburban garden, so I have no manure available. Besides, I kind of like digging with spade. But I really appreciate the idea of putting newspapers into the soil. I have some spots with really tough clay and lots of newpapers!

    karsan
     
  8. amyd

    amyd Well-Known Member

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    I don't have access to "homade :p " manure. . .would a bag that you buy with the compost/potting soil/mulch be okay?
     
  9. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    You can use just about any thing which will decompose.