Language Barrier?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by largentdepoche, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Do any of you deal with language barriers on a day to day basis? (I hope this won't turn into a immigration thread.)

    MIL speaks some broken English and I speak broken Finnish lol.

    She asked me about my tooth and I thought she said I had a beard LOL!

    Katrina
     
  2. sweetcountrygrl

    sweetcountrygrl Well-Known Member

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    I do at work. Sometimes it makes for a lot of laughs but everyone is very understanding and we usually meet somewhere in the middle with 1/2 English and 1/2 Japanese.
     

  3. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does Southern count?? :shrug: I work with alot of people from the North and we do have a language barrier!
     
  4. nana-san

    nana-san Well-Known Member

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    yes, my japanese is not to par and the kanji and hiragana is even more of a challenge.

    thank goodness my daughter takes Japanese in school
     
  5. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    A few clerks in the big box stores up here that are transplanted deep south southerners are very difficult to understand sometimes. I notice many locals asking them to repeat what the 'southern talk' person said, or need to 'interpret' what they mean. Can be frustrating, even though they mean well and are nice, they just don't 'fit' with local dialect to fully understand. If it's too much strain to understand them or get 'lipped off' from them, I shop somewhere else.
     
  6. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I dont deal with it on a daily basis, but when I go to NC to visit my wife's family she has to interpret for me sometimes, lol.
     
  7. SFM in KY

    SFM in KY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd definitely say "Southern" counts. I moved to Kentucky 7 years ago and had never lived in the south at all previously. I STILL have difficulty understanding some people here, specific words more than anything else and more often on the phone than in person. I find myself really trying to avoid phoning any of the local businesses or offices because of it.

    I honestly don't remember having much more difficulty after the first year or two when I lived in Spain for 5 years!
     
  8. puglady

    puglady Well-Known Member

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    In the small Christian school where I teach, I have two boys from Cameroon, a girl from the Ivory Coast, four Croatian boys, a South Korean girl and a German boy (hallelujah, someone I can communicate with). Believe me, I do a lot of acting things out and simplifying my language. I love them to pieces but they do wear me out. You really start realizing how many "expressions" we use that we don't really mean. I had to stop saying, "that really gets my goat" as they would worry about my goat being stolen.
     
  9. Auric

    Auric Registered Doofus

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    I have to converse with my in-laws in german, as it is the common language for all of us. They are of Greek and Turkish descent, but live in Germany. It keeps things interesting!
     
  10. FarmGoddess

    FarmGoddess Well-Known Member

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    My poor DH being Hawaiian by way of California and has had to learn "Southern". Then I took him down to the bayou where my sister lives and introduced him to Cajun. Poor boy stays confused...

    :hobbyhors :hobbyhors :hobbyhors
     
  11. via media

    via media Tub-thumper

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    I regularly work with people from all over the world and have found that I have the most difficult time when we speak over the phone. Email/chats are much easier because it gives me time to understand what they mean.
    ----------------
    As far as the southern thing, my mother's neighbor moved from somewhere in the neighborhood of Nebraska. The woman was terrified because she was talking to someone about noises in her attic and he told her about the Wolf Rats we have down here.

    She was trying to find out just how big a wolf rat was...only to learn that the guy was saying ROOF rat :rotfl: (Around here, they don't say rooooooooooof like they do up north. It kind of comes out "ruff".)

    /VM
     
  12. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Once, when my chinese daughter came home, we did that "whatever word works" kind of thing. Whatever chinese I knew, whatever english she could pick up on. It took about 6 months of that before her english was at a point where we weren't starting a sentece in one language and ending it in another. Sometimes we weren't aware of which language we were using! They sort of mixed together. :) Yes, I do remember. There is a subtle stress in that kind of thing. It does get better.

    Cindyc.
     
  13. FiddleKat

    FiddleKat Mother,Artist, Author Supporter

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    :rotfl: :rotfl:

    I can relate with that Queen Bee. We live in Tennessee, but moved here from Boston. We have alot of friends here now, and sometimes our conversations turn into a "what?" "what?" fest. Very funny.

    I am learning to pronounce my R's now, before car was CAA, and fire FI-A.
     
  14. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My second-now-ex husband is from Missouri. when we were traveling thorugh Georgia, he had to translate back and forth as they didn't understand this Yankee and I didn't understand much of what they said either :shrug: .

    My family speaks a foreign language as well as English. Much of the time, sentences are in two languages. When my stepfather was alive, he also had a very thick accent and poor Roger was lost much of the time. I would translate for him.
     
  15. via media

    via media Tub-thumper

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    You'll know you're pronouncing them correctly when "car" and "fire" rhyme :D

    /VM
     
  16. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    I live in eastern Ontario where most towns are bilingual French and English. I work in a company that hires several French instructors and staff who barely speak enough english to get by. I am uni-lingual English. Needless to say I have major language barriers, especially if I want to advance in the company.
     
  17. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    As an Australian participating on several American discussion forums, I have language problems all the time! I suspect that if I ever visited America, it would be like being landed on another planet. I know that I seldom watch American shows on TV because I can't understand the lingo. Not all shows, but some.

    Puglady, you'd have an interesting time in some Australian schools, where you might find up to 80 different languages being spoken by the pupils!

    Then there's than unique language whose name I have forgotten, but with which we are all very familiar. It's seen on instruction manuals for Japanese products - a sort of quasi-English that it quite hilarious.
     
  18. Ohio dreamer

    Ohio dreamer 1/2 bubble off plumb

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    Not yet for the kids and I, but DH is spending more time in Hungary then the US. So we are getting extra batteries for our translator and a few different dictionaries to gear up for our move. We are also loading up and the paper and pencils so we can jot down all those stories we know will be funny later...like the one when DH and I got pulled over by the Budapest police and after 10 mins of lots of grunts and pointing from them and us we realized we had on the wrong set of lights...the car had 3 different sets of headlight..who knew!
     
  19. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Lol, Georgian dialect can be super weird at times.

    I lived there 9 years before moving to Finland, but I STILL get stumped when we go back and visit.

    Alot of it sounds like ding dinga ding ding lol. I stood in line once for about 2 minutes having no clue the cashier was asking me if I'd pay with a card or cash LOL!

    Kat