Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Home depot has 3X3X8 with rounded edge treated landscape timbers on sale for $1.97 ea. Are there any reasons I can't use them as fence posts? I like the slabbed off sides for putting fence planks on but I wonder if the green treating is sufficient for use when buried.

Anyone have any thoughts on that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
They'd be ok for a decorative fence. Most of the 3x3s I've seen were grown in plantations, very quickly, with few growth rings and not much strength to them. I've seen them snap in half from dropping them from waist height. I wouldn't trust one to hold any animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
They are not treated for "in the ground use". I thought of it years ago but contacted "wolmanized" I think and they informed me that they were not treated strongly enough for in ground use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
widfam said:
They are not treated for "in the ground use". I thought of it years ago but contacted "wolmanized" I think and they informed me that they were not treated strongly enough for in ground use.
We put some in as fence posts 17 years ago and they are still standing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The fence I have in mind would go the length of my drive, about 70 yards or so, on both sides. I want to put 1X6X10 planks up in three rows and then two strands of barbed wire on the inside to keep the calves off of it.

Bad Idea?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,215 Posts
I wonder if they would have enough strength to be used as brace posts on corners? That wouldn't be an underground use, but you'd want something with some resilience for such a task.
 

·
Retired Coastie
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
B, up to this point I have used them as posts to attach cattle panels for my my goat buck large pen. Hope that made reasonable sense. Also have used them as posts to fence off my garden. So far so good...My bit of input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
i used em for a 6ft wooden privacy fence and many are going on 10 years , although i have had a few break and when extracting the remains they were pretty rotted right near ground line but lower down still seemed fine, if the fence isnt going to take a big wind load i would use them for sure at that price
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,836 Posts
I tried using them to put a 6 ft welded wire fence here when I first moved here. All 300 posts twisted and warped within 30 days , slacking the fence.

Forget the landscappe timber for anything other than decorative sawbuck rail fence.
 

·
agmantoo
Joined
·
10,852 Posts
Land scape timbers are the core of trees that were peeled to make plywood. For some reason I do not understand why but I was told that the cores do not readily accept the anti rot treatment uniformly. I have observed some land scape timber that have held up very good as posts and I have witness others that rotted promptly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
They might last a long time in the ground, since they ARE treated for insects and you COULD dip em in roofing tar befor ya planted them...

However, these things are NOT dried when you buy them. They are a by-product of plywood factories. Plywood factories take yellow poplar logs and turn them on a giant lathe to remove the veneer they need for their plywood.

They turn the logs until they're only 4" in diameter. Then, they lop off 2 sides and "Viola" a landscape timber.

I built a 24'X36' log cabin with these untreated poplar logs I got directly from a plywood factory. When I drove 6" pole barn nails into them, water was squirting out.

They go (Wet) from the plywood factory to a pressure treatment facility where they are imersed in chemicals and Pressurized to force the chemical into the wood.

Then, they go to the big box stores and you buy a wet landscape timber.

Drive a nail in one and watch the water squirt out.

Anyway...stand them upright in a hole, in the sun, and as they dry, they will warp into all kinds of interesting shapes.

Shrek...next time, check with me... :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
Due to concerns about polution they have cut the chemicals down to half what they used a couple of years ago. So what worked five or more years ago will probably not work with todays treated wood, even good treated wood.
Land scape timbers are useless as far as I am concerned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
Shadow said:
Land scape timbers are useless as far as I am concerned.
TREATED landscape timbers = "Useless"

Here are some shots of my cabin made from UNTREATED landscape timbers...I just spent 5 days there...fishing in the pond...101 bass caught (Small, but tasty!)







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,074 Posts
Shadow said:
Due to concerns about polution they have cut the chemicals down to half what they used a couple of years ago. So what worked five or more years ago will probably not work with todays treated wood, even good treated wood.
Land scape timbers are useless as far as I am concerned.
I agree, and my experience is that they don't do well buried, made for borders.
Yes they do dry in some interesting shapes!
 

·
Okie with Attitude
Joined
·
2,820 Posts
Rockin'B said:
The fence I have in mind would go the length of my drive, about 70 yards or so, on both sides. I want to put 1X6X10 planks up in three rows and then two strands of barbed wire on the inside to keep the calves off of it.

Bad Idea?
We have a fence that the untreated landscaping timbers were used as fence posts. The fence has been in for over 10 yrs and only one of the posts have had any trouble. Termites got it, not rot. The biggest problem is that over time, some of them will bow.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,204 Posts
The ones we get up here would not be worth planting in the ground. Our yellow clay rots them off in a couple years. Those cheapies are not treated to be in ground, and are made of very cheap, spindly wood. It would be a waste of time to use those 'here'.

--->Paul
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,092 Posts
Like anything else.......there are good landscape timbers and some that are not so good. If you are willing (or rather, if the place that you are purchasing them at, is willing to let you sort thru them) then you can find those that are suitable for posts. To insure that they will "last" longer, I've then purchased a product called Cuprinol which is a treatment that can be either spread on with a brush or soaked onto the item which gives longer protection. I've "painted" it about 3 and a half feet ......or just enough to give ground protection and a few more inches above.......works great, but does add to the cost. Of course the land that I've been putting them in is mostly sand and fine glacial gravel which drains quite well and also helps.
 

·
Up the Creek
Joined
·
201 Posts
I know it's not very earth-friendly so don't start screaming bloody murder at me but what we used to do was soak posts in diesel fuel or used motor oil for a few days before planting the fence. That was 20 or so years ago and I know of several fences still standing.
I do like the Cuprinol approach though.

Doug
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,448 Posts
I just pulled up some that have been buried for many years. I bought the place about 8 years ago and they were in place for a flower bed before I bought. I pilled them out and all but one was in great shape. Many of them were completely under ground, I couldn't even see them until I began digging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I have about 200' of 6'high stockade fencing that was put in over 12yrs ago using landscape timbers. Every one is still standing strong, straight & sturdy. I have even built a small pole barn using them for the posts with no problems, & my backyard swamps out everytime it rains. They are all cemented inground. I will be building a chicken coop/storage barn this summer, & plan on using landscape timbers for the posts.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top