Landraace pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by tbishop, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    If you haven't guessed by now, I'm a reader and a researcher by nature :). I've been reading about the landraaces this past couple of days. I was very interested in the Finnish landraaces. I'm Finnish by heritage myself, so that's interesting, as I know my great grandfather was a farmer before he came over here. I'm also interested because they seem to be extremely long and lean. Maybe slightly smaller than average too. I'm wondering if there is any place I can look to find out more about the landraaces in general and their availability in the US. I hope you guys don't mind my constant questions :) .

    Tim
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tim,
    I'm not too much up with the Landrace but as nobody has answered your post I thought I would bring it back to the top again.

    As I understand it, the breed was developed in Denmark but from my reading, both Sweden and Finland have had a hand in it's continued development. The American Landrace are descendants of a Danish breed imported in the early 1930's. They are purported to have the highest number of piglets per litter, high birth weights and good milking abilities. Not only that, they have the largest ears of any breed of pig :eek: Their length makes them good baconers, or if putting into pork, ensuring lots of chops.

    Running a close second to the Landrace, and similar to them, is the Large White (you call them Yorkshires). Long body and good all-rounders.

    I have bred Large Whites for many years but am moving out of them into Durocs - and the Duroc/Lge White cross makes for an excellent pig. Landrace never really took off in this country with the Large White being the preferred breed for commercial breeder so that is what is more readily available.

    Do a search on the net, there is a mine of information out there if you have the time to spend browsing around. I wish I had the time.......


    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    One of our fellow homestead forum members (GeorgeK) has a website with some excellent info:
    http://www.windridgefarm.us/potbellypigs.htm
     
  4. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    KY
    Hi!
    Landrace hogs are GREAT milkers, but are known to be stubborn and, stupid, and mostly blind because of the way their long ears flop over their eyes. This "blindness" makes them very difficult to move/manage. I used to run a commercial operation in which we took registered landrace gilts and bred them to a registered Yorkshire boar. The resulting gilts (called F1's) were then bred to another Yorkshire boar which produced F2 pigs from which we raised our top hogs for market. The Landrace sows were sold after producing 2 litters of F1's and the F1 gilts were used as breeding stock. By crossing the Yorkshire and Landrace, we were able to get short-eared, intelligent gilts who were GREAT milkers/producers. The F2 market stock was long, lean and topped out at 260 lbs. within 5 months of birth. This program worked very well for us, and we were able to market an average of 100 top hogs every 2 weeks.
     
  5. rev

    rev Member

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    Minnesota
    Curious you should ask; just noticed a NEW (to me) web-site for 4 old breed swine varieties- It was in SMALL FARM TODAY magazine by the way:

    www.nationalswine.com

    Included are Landrace, Hampshire, Duroc and Yorkshire breeds. Hope this is what you are looking for.
     
  6. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    May 29, 2002
    That's all I've raised were Landrace. Long and lean. Pretty nice temperment. Very good mothers and usually large litters.
    Unfortunately I'll have to switch nowt o another breed ... my breeder just sold all his stock and I have to find more local pigs.