Land Sharing Idea - what do you think?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Home~Maker, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. Home~Maker

    Home~Maker Urban Homesteader =0)

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  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds ok if all partys had a good personality. AND - What you plan will pass any local zoning laws. Water and sewage situations would have to be doable legaly. Check on acreage required to set up a home in your area.
     

  3. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    wow, those are some big dreams. i hope you can pull it all off.
     
  4. Donna-6

    Donna-6 Well-Known Member

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    Think that would be a great idea, if you all can get along!!Land down here in Hancock co. Tn goes for $1000 an acre. Out in country, have what ya want and no-body complaines. A house, trailor and cabin with a lot of land went for $200,000. Live, appro. 19 miles from one town and 32 from next. Was a durt road few years ago. Have some EX Nuns lives down here. They use to raise goats and make their cheese. One makes quilts and sells them. For over 20 some years they have survived down here.. If ya a interested let mme know!!!
     
  5. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    Take a look at how the Amish develop new homesteads. Your plan sounds good, and can work. :happy:
     
  6. Nax

    Nax Well-Known Member

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    If you want to stay friends with these people, don't do it.

    It sounds as if there can be a lot of volatility and difference of expectations in such a disparate group of people, no matter how similar your aspirations appear at the moment.

    You are dealing with people who are new to the country, and have yet to experience the culture shock of our values and customs. You don't even share a common language with the people with whom you're entering into a major, life-altering, agreement.

    Nothing is going to make you feel left out quicker than everyone else discussing what will be done and you not understanding. And there will be fights--you're talking (or having it translated) about money, land, taxes, improvements, legalities. I don't know if you could put yourself into a more tense situation.

    If you're only wanting a few acres parcel in the end, just wait a little while more, and you'll have enough saved to go it totally your own way. Besides, the dreaming, anticipation, and shopping is a fun part.
     
  7. Nax

    Nax Well-Known Member

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    You don't need to convince me. :D You just asked if people thought it was a good idea. I think not, IMHO. :D

    You may think you know them, but enter into a business agreement with them, and you're gonna find out stuff you never knew, especially with just off the plane immigrants.

    And people of the same faith don't argue with one another? But that would belong in General Chat. :D
     
  8. mom2girls

    mom2girls mom2girls

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    Hi Homemaker, I have been thinking the same thoughts you have! I would love to do what you are planning. I think it would work, as long as it was all out in the open to begin with, and it sounds like it is. Good luck, I look forward to reading about it all. mom2girls
     
  9. ellebeaux

    ellebeaux Well-Known Member

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    This sounds like a really nice idea. I have a group of friends from high school and college that all live in an association of 5 1910-era townhouses in downtown Cleveland. Except for the fact that it's in downtown Cleveland, I'm totally jealous because they get to see each other all the time plus have their privacy. The first guy bought his condo for $36K and later sold it to another guy for $120K, 8 years later!

    Anyway, I looked around here for property to buy and subdivide later. It was near impossible to find and I gave up on the idea. Getting zoning permission to do so can take several years. Making sure all the plots perked was another problem. The realtors were snapping up the places as fast as they came available.

    Not sure what it's like out there but thought you'd like to know,

    Beaux
     
  10. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Will you be purchasing the larger tract of land as a corporation? Or will one family get the loan to purchase the land and then re-sale portions to other two couples? Most lenders will not approve holding a lien on property you plan to sub-divide, doing so without their written approval is likely cause of demand for full payment or the lost of what you've invested in the land or both.

    I noted you have to first convince your husband and then it will be up to him to convince the other two husbands? No input from the other two wives? If you're okay with your ideas being credited to someone else there should not be a problem in the future concerning that.

    I'm also wondering about the two Uncles who seem to have found traditional wives from their homelands instead of citizens here, such as your husband has done. And how can you have no doubts about sharing homesteading ideas with two women you can't possible know how well you will get along with yet?

    You might not see any of these possiblities as problems, best of luck to you in makig your dreams reality.

    Marlene
     
  11. Qwispea

    Qwispea Well-Known Member

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    I think if you cannot come up with the $6000 to buy a few acres of land..then it is probably not a good idea to start thinking about building barns and homes and drilling wells and digging septics and buying animals and building a roadstand stand and developing a large enough garden so as to be able to stock/sell nearly year round..etc.

    Dreaming is one thing..but to expect forum readers to agree with everything about your dream is living in a fantasy world.
     
  12. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a "nice" idea, I wouldn't do it on a bet. You asked, that's my opinion.
     
  13. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are going to need more than six acres. I have six acres, a narrow parcel running along the road. A two acre lot is nice, but if you are going to have animals, you will find that that two acres isn't enough. You may also find that, if you look around, for the price of six acres in one area, you can get twenty in another. Since you are thinking of raising goats, not carrots, you do not need number 1 soil. Soil is classified by numbers that relate to how good it is for farming. Learn about soil before you buy. Your county will have soil maps that you can look at.

    Two of my sisters and their families live in Dearborn, so I know where that is. My guess is you live between Dearborn and Chicago, so in SW Michigan. Land is more expensive near the lake, less expensive the further away you are to the lake. If you call the county assessor's office, they can give you an idea of what land is selling for. Buy as much land as you can, and quit claim it to each other (divide it up) as soon as possible. If one of the families decides it doesn't want to live in the country, they can sit on the land while the value goes up, and they will probably let you run your livestock on it.

    Good luck!
     
  14. Qwispea

    Qwispea Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately..you just proved my point. [sigh]
     
  15. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    Same old thing...the hostility is building up again. I would say, and my thought when I first read this earlier today...If you have a dream and have meditated and worked it out in your mind and on paper, hopefully, then do it. Who is to tell you whether it is right or wrong? My only thought is...most of us here, like myself, cherish country life for the privacy aspect of it all, but only you know what is/isn't right for yourself and your family. Deb
     
  16. Muskrat

    Muskrat Well-Known Member

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    Home Maker:

    To my mind, the homesteading forum is not a stroke-your-ego, make-you-feel-good-about-yourself no matter what place. It's about sharing experiences, among other things, that will help others avoid the pitfalls we've either fallen into or seen. In other words, if you don't want my opinion, don't ask. Nobody here is trying to 'poop' on your dreams; some are, however, trying to point out the difference between dreams and fantasies. Qwispea and others have been very gentle in their comments on your plans. They could have been much rougher in their critiques of the 'planning' you're doing to make your dreams come true.

    Your parameters and descriptions have a certain variance among your posts that indicates you haven't developed concrete plans. Before you start buying land, you should have a clearer idea of what you're looking for which means you'll need to have a clearer idea of what you plan to do with the land and what you'll have to do to make it happen.

    For instance, you said you were planning to sell cheese at the local farmers' market. Do you have to have a license to sell manufactured foods? Do you have to have a license to sell milk products to the public? Were you planning to build a separate facility to process the milk? Some states don't allow you to process food for public consumption in the family kitchen. What about cold storage for the products? Again, probably not room in the family refrigerator. Do you personally have to have health certificates? Does your goat herd have to be inspected and/or certified? How many goats are you planning to have? Can you milk them yourselves or will you need to hire help? How much grazing land will you need? How are you planning to keep the kids separate from the milking does? Can you afford the fencing necessary to contain goats? What will you do with the bucks? How will you manage breeding to meet the needs for the meat market, which tends to be seasonal, and the milk product market? How big will your barn need to be? What will you do with the cheese and milk during the winter when the farmers market isn't open? Is there an alternate market? How will you manage a steady production of cheese and yogurt through the season or year? How will you house the goats in the winter so the kids don't raid the milk? How will milking and marketing interfere with your paper route?

    Once you've decided what you're going to do with the land, then you can begin discussions with how you're going to go about buying it. As for your plan of group-buying, by the time you pay the additional costs for the second sale, then you'll lose most of any financial advantage you gained.

    Besides, from what you've said, since you own the house and he has money in the bank, why are you going to put everyone through the aggravation of finding a parcel of land everyone agrees on instead of just buying a parcel of your own?
     
  17. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    noone ever thought of that before on this board :rolleyes:
     
  18. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    My suggestion -

    If you and your friends feel strongly that this is a good and workable idea, go ahead and do it. But before you do, as a group, discuss and plan an exit strategy that you can follow in case it doesn't look as good a few years down the road.

    Really plan your exit strategy with the same rigor that you plan your success strategy. And consider the long term in the planning. After you are all gone, what kind of success and exit strategies do you have in place for your children.

    Your plan as it is now may be great or it may be a real disaster, but there's nothing wrong with finding out you've made a mistake if you have a plan that will carry you past any mistakes.

    I love exit stategies. Just planning for them often keeps you from ever needing to use them. But if you need them, hooray - you've got them! We just landed on our feet brilliantly after a corporate downsizing and expect to spend the rest of our lives successfuly self employed from home, working together. It has been going great (and as planned) so far, but we also have several exit strategies agreed to in case we run into unpleasant surprises down the road. And we know under what criteria we activate any of those strategies so that we can change course without risking our long term financial security.

    Really plan for your "what if's". What if one couple becomes disabled? What if you buy rural land but cities expand and you face zoning rules? What if you lose buildings to fire or flood? What if you find out one of your friends abuses their spouse or children? What if one is lazy or grumpy or just really annoying? What if you want to leave the area to move closer to an elderly parent?

    Good luck with it.

    Lynda
     
  19. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to side with Muskrat on this one--especially about the regulations--many a happy farmer's market/farm stand pipe dream is dashed by gov. red tape...especially where dairy's concerned. Answer every question Muskrat has posed on paper, print out all the forms/applications, etc. that are required, etc. before you consider for a moment that anything other than crafts and whole vegetables are a viable homestead income option for you.

    I'll also suggest that if the three families want to live together next to each other, that they are all responsible for purchasing their own land instead of doing it in a collective, as you're suggesting. No land seller is going to balk at getting $20,000 from three people instead of $60,000 from one. What's the point in buying the land together and then splitting it, other than add another possible complication in an already ambitious idea? Also consider whether there are subdivision restrictions in your area, because if your area is like most, a plan like yours will require a site eval and subdivision permits from the town. Are you all going to have your own road to the homes or share one? Who's responsible for the upkeep of it?

    It's a nice idea, but in addition to the above suggestions, if you decide to do it, I have one word for you: CORPORATION.
     
  20. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    OK MODS..delete this if you dont like it.

    Home~Maker basicly you and your friends want to buy a large parcel, split it and have your own places, right? Well that sounds reasonable. You're not the first one to pose these kinds of questions on the board. And how many of you, HT'ers, if given the chance to pick your neighbors would jump on it? Put your soapboxes away people, she came in asking advice, and nothing more. If this is about religion, well there are better places to argue that one.

    I had this whole long message typed up but fin29 said it all. there is red tape, there are permits, there will be issues. but if you want to do it, check into it really well. What I was told:start slow and build. You might find that in 5 years its a lot easier to do this than it will be next gardening season. It all depends on what you go thru to get housing set up, water and sewer, all those plans you posted, what animals you want, learning the ins and outs of animals and gardens, marketing, etc. If you end up being successfull your first year out then more power to you girl. :rock: