lameness

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by kesoaps, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I've got a ram who appeared a bit tender a few days ago. I checked his feet, nothing that I could see. Definitely in the hoof area, as he didn't care if I squeezed or pulled anywhere else, but as soon as pressure was applied to the hoof, he winced and pulled away.

    At first I thought he'd bruised it. It's been super dry and no hoof rot issues, but the pressure I applied was at the heel and I wondered if he'd stepped on something? Figured it may get better in a day or two.

    Instead it's gotten worse. He barely puts his hoof down, and has been lying down while eating. I checked it again, really carefully to see if perhaps I'd missed a thorn or something, but can't find any reason for him to be tender. Then I realized it could be the gland in the front, and sure enough it was a bit on the hard side and I could squeeze out some oily goo (that's the technical term :rolleyes: .) I checked on it a couple times during the day, squeezing it open and making sure there wasn't anything plugging it left behind. Saw no improvement yesterday. About how long would it take, if it had been a clogged gland?
     
  2. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Sounds like Foot scald and here is what I found on it.

    Since foot rot is one of the most devastating diseases in the U.S. sheep industry it is not surprising the questions and request for information on the subject. This article is an attempt to educate and clear confusion surround Foot rot and Foot Scald in sheep.
    Clinical Signs: The most common clinical sign of foot rot or foot scald is sheep is simply limping sheep. Both scald and rot appear the same until you tip the sheep onto its rump and trim the hooves with a trimmer. This is where the difference lies. Foot rot will have undermined distorted hooves that when the outer surface is trimmed a deep hoof infection is obvious by the foul-smelling odor and soft necrotic appearance. Foot scald on the other hand has no involvement of the hoof but is rather and infection in between the two claws (toes). If you trim feet of sheep that are affected by scale the hoof is normal in texture and appearance with the only abnormality on the inside of the claws.
    Pathogenisis: Foot rot is a synergistic infection of Bacteroides nodosus and Fusobacterium necophorum. Both are obligate anareobic bacteria that die in the presence of oxygen. B. nodosus is the contagious element of footrot and is only found in sheep that are infected with footrot or in the environment for only a short period of time (2 weeks). F. necrophorum is a normal inhabitant of soil and manure and can always be found where sheep are raised. Foot scald (interdigital dematitis) is an infection of only F. necrophorum and is not contagious. It may appear contagious, however that is only because the environment is such (damp, muddy conditions) that more than one sheep will get infected.
    Treatment: Treatment of foot rot should be approached from a flock standpoint. There are essentially two groups: the sheep that are infected and lame and the sheep that are not-infected or sub-clinically infected (not lame). The lame sheep should be isolated, the feet should be trimmed to expose the infected tissue to oxygen, treated topically with kopertox and given an injection of long-acting penicillin or tetracycline. The non-lame group should be run through a footbath of zinc sulfate or formaldehyde every three weeks. This group should also be monitored for new cases and those new cases should be isolated and treated.
    Treatment of foot scald is not nearly as complex as the disease is not contagious. Rather the entire group can be kept together but it is critical to get the sheep to a dry pasture or yard. Topical treatment with kopertox is beneficial as is footbaths

    I do not like to use Kopertox on sheep since it has such high levels of copper in it. The Purple "Thrush" buster works as well with out the copper. Can get it at most feed stores.
    Hope he gets better soon!
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    But there's nothing between the toes (claws?), I've run my fingers between them countless times at this point. Also, no rain here all summer; he's been on high ground. I may go ahead and treat it just the same, though.
     
  4. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Hummm.... where did the goo you squeezed out before come from?
    Was it between the toes?

    I could be reading your first post wrong....even if you cleaned everything out the first time...there could still be stuff building up. To me it sounds like Scald but could be wrong.

    Let us know how it goes.
     
  5. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    It's the gland above the actual hoof, Bergere. I just came in from checking between the toes one more time...absolutely nothing in there, dry as can be. But there was a clog again in the pore/gland at what would be the coronary band. I unplugged it again. He's getting leary of me now...not a bad thing for a ram, lol! I think it looked as though he was standing a bit more squarely on it, however, so it could be he just needs a couple days to realize it's not hurting so badly. :shrug: