Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a yearling heifer come up lame yesterday evening. She was found laying down in the wood line and did not come to feed like the other. So I got her on her feet and her right front leg was lame. She would put very little pressure on it. At first I thought maybe she stepped in a hole. So I moved her to the barn and inspected for snake bites , hoof rot and swelling. None of which showed. I picked up her leg and all joints seemed to work proper, but she had no appetite. Got up this morning and she was laid up against the gate dead as can be. I have no ideas what could have caused this other than a severe shoulder wound that may have caused fluid in the lungs killing her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
Sounds like blackleg. Limping one day dead the next. Very important to vaccinate for, it seems to always take the best. Will hit five or ten calves in a 50 cow herd, just about the time you are seeing dollar signs. Might go a ten year stretch with no incidences. Vaccine definitely maths out on this one though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aoconnor1

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,792 Posts
Thanks for posting. We vaccinate for blackleg. Sometimes you wonder why, now I know.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
Vaxing is cheap and easy compared to losing critters. My vet sold me what I needed and showed me how to give the shots for any new critters coming to the farm. I unloaded each one into their stall vaxing them as they came off the trailer. Kept them isolated for min of thirty days before putting with the herd. Kept my losses way down that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
Blackleg persists in the soil for decades. It lives in the gut of cattle, normally passing through without effect in vaccinated cattle. and in adult cattle that have gradually built immunity over time. If you, or anyone that has cattle within a wild animal's walking distance has had blackleg within the last 50 years, you are at risk. It seems to affect young cattle, maybe curiously licking dirt loaded with the pathogen, while having a young tender rumen, maybe having eaten something a little too rough that caused abrasions. Dirt temperature has to be warm enough to cause the organism to become active. Huge active pathogen numbers and stomach abrasions allow the pathogen to pass into the blood causing the lethal infection. Otherwise it's an ever present, benign, soil organism. Vaccinating new arrivals and quarantining will do you no good. You must vaccinate the young. Boostering adults is a good idea.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
Blackleg persists in the soil for decades. It lives in the gut of cattle, normally passing through without effect in vaccinated cattle. and in adult cattle that have gradually built immunity over time. If you, or anyone that has cattle within a wild animal's walking distance has had blackleg within the last 50 years, you are at risk. It seems to affect young cattle, maybe curiously licking dirt loaded with the pathogen, while having a young tender rumen, maybe having eaten something a little too rough that caused abrasions. Dirt temperature has to be warm enough to cause the organism to become active. Huge active pathogen numbers and stomach abrasions allow the pathogen to pass into the blood causing the lethal infection. Otherwise it's an ever present, benign, soil organism. Vaccinating new arrivals and quarantining will do you no good. You must vaccinate the young. Boostering adults is a good idea.
maybe but I never lost my critters to blacleg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
maybe but I never lost my critters to blacleg.
Well rootitootoo good for you. Just know that when you do, it will probably be ten percent of the herd, and they will probably be the nicest calves and yearlings that you have. I've played that game enough to know the deck is stacked against you concerning blackleg.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,241 Posts
Well rootitootoo good for you. Just know that when you do, it will probably be ten percent of the herd, and they will probably be the nicest calves and yearlings that you have. I've played that game enough to know the deck is stacked against you concerning blackleg.
I think you may have misunderstood YH's comment. Previously, he indicated he worked with his vet to establish what vaccinations were required and backed that up with an isolation program, thus not losing any animals to blackleg.

If we take him at his word, instead of hurling insults, we can pretty safely assume, he will continue to not lose calves to blackleg as long as he continues to follow the vaccination program established by his vet.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
I think you may have misunderstood YH's comment. Previously, he indicated he worked with his vet to establish what vaccinations were required and backed that up with an isolation program, thus not losing any animals to blackleg.

If we take him at his word, instead of hurling insults, we can pretty safely assume, he will continue to not lose calves to blackleg as long as he continues to follow the vaccination program established by his vet.
I'm no longer in the game, but yes, I worked with my vet successfully for over twenty years. Never lost a calf to black leg during that time. I beleive in vaccines, sanitary living conditions and isolation from the herd for 30 days when bringing new critters into the farm. I had a few losses, every one within a couple weeks of coming to the farm. None from blackleg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
Wouldn't want anyone looking for information do get the idea his program was a successful protocol to protect against blackleg (which its not). He simply dodged a bullet. Blackleg hits the most healthy and robust young animals in the herd in late summer and early fall. Quarantining does virtually nothing for this disease. Vaccinating adult animals does very little to protect their offspring from this disease.

Have seen several outbreaks of blackleg through my 40 years of dealing with cattle. Most of them were economically devastating. All of those outbreaks happened to people with an ineffective prevention protocol, including the one referenced above.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Allen W

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
Wouldn't want anyone looking for information do get the idea his program was a successful protocol to protect against blackleg (which its not). He simply dodged a bullet. Blackleg hits the most healthy and robust young animals in the herd in late summer and early fall. Quarantining does virtually nothing for this disease. Vaccinating adult animals does very little to protect their offspring from this disease.

Have seen several outbreaks of blackleg through my 40 years of dealing with cattle. Most of them were economically devastating. All of those outbreaks happened to people with an ineffective prevention protocol, including the one referenced above.
So your saying vaccinating doesn't prevent blackleg?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
So your saying vaccinating doesn't prevent blackleg?
No. That is not what I am saying. I am saying that improperly vaccinating does not prevent blackleg. It's also a waste of time and money.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
Ok, I'm confused. My vet taught me how to "properly" vaccinate my calves and even adult cows as they came to the farm. That and spending time in quarantine in case of carrying in other nasties. Calves born here on the farm got their vaccinations within days of birth, no need for quarantine. My only losses from disease using this method occurred in the "quarrentine stalls". Never blackleg. Where did I waste time and money?
No. That is not what I am saying. I am saying that improperly vaccinating does not prevent blackleg. It's also a waste of time and money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,514 Posts
Calves "vaccinated a few days from birth" develop very little immune response as a result of the vaccine. Have seen 10 dead and bloated 500 pounders a week from market on a farm that decided they would do the easy thing and vaccinate wobbly legged calves, instead of doing the hard (and effective) thing, which is working 200 pounders through a chute and vaccinating them, and then boostering them, and boostering cows every fall so that they can pass some immunity in their colostrum to calves too young to develop immunity from vaccine.

What you did is better than nothing, but very close to nothing in terms of blackleg prevention.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,780 Posts
Calves "vaccinated a few days from birth" develop very little immune response as a result of the vaccine. Have seen 10 dead and bloated 500 pounders a week from market on a farm that decided they would do the easy thing and vaccinate wobbly legged calves, instead of doing the hard (and effective) thing, which is working 200 pounders through a chute and vaccinating them, and then boostering them, and boostering cows every fall so that they can pass some immunity in their colostrum to calves too young to develop immunity from vaccine.

What you did is better than nothing, but very close to nothing in terms of blackleg prevention.
All I know is that I never lost a critter to black leg in twenty some years doing it the way my vet recommended. Very few losses at all considering I started with bringing baby calves in from the stock pens regularly. Took me a while to learn quit killing them by over feeding.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top