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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is no section in the livestock for lama's.
What do you do with them?
Do they give milk?
Do you eat them?
They don't look big enough to ride, (maybe they can pull a cart)
Rock
 

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There is no section in the livestock for lama's.
What do you do with them?
I always say that the mule,llama and gander are the three barnyard animals that will die before they will learn to respect you.
(Ok, the gander learned after being punted across the yard a few times after making the mistake of biting me.):nono:
 

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Rock,

Llama's are good pack animals, and herd protectors. I bet they eat them in South America, but not sure anyone around here eats them. Milking a llama would be quite a skill to learn. If you get the hang of it, write a book.

We had a llama until a few days ago, we gave her away. She was a little mean to our nubian buck so she had to go. My wife was able to break the llama to lead and this one never actually spit at any of us. We used her as a candy packer in the local 4-H parade. Really a neat animal once you learn how to act and react around them.
 

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Expensive pasture decoration.
Not anymore as you can find them for less than $100 now. They make good guards for livestock. Their fiber is good for people that spin. They are good for packing & also pull carts if trained properly.
 

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I'll admit I ended up with 3 Alpaca's, cheap. They needed a home. Their fiber/fleece is a handspinners dream.
I was planning to show their fleece at the county fairs, like I used to do with the sheep I raised in the past.

If you look into Llamas or Alpaca's make sure they are easy to catch,well halter trained and you can handle their feet for trims.
Other wise they can make a rank bull seem tame.

Not all Llamas guard. If you have sheep make sure any male has been gelded at least 8 months, Please don't ask me how I know.

You are right, they are not big enough for adults to ride but I have seen them trained to cart.

They are clean animals.. will like to put their manure in one area but you need to keep it clean. Manure is good for the kitchen garden and they sure make a lot of it.
Though I still think horse manure is the best for a great garden.

If you like nice fiber they make great animals to have. Basically think of them as giant sheep, that the average predator is a little less likely to mess with.
Been around enough Camelids,, llamas/alpacas, to not want to mess with milking them. Though I know they do with Camels. Theres an animal, no strange person or predator is going to mess with. LOL
 

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I have Tony Lamas....I wear them.
 

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neighbor has a bunch of Llamas for flock protection, he loses almost as many lambs as we do! there is a good Llama that protects and does not take much to feed but must be treated with respect!
 

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Expensive pasture decoration.
Friends of ours have 18 llamas. The 1st ones they bought for $1800/@! Now they have "Llama Sales" several times a year & can sell one or 2 for about $300/@
Pretty animals but skiddish. Our friends don't take care of them as far as grooming & I feel sorry for them in the TX heat.

Patty
 

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I was surprised to find quite a few Llamas right around the Phoenix area, that long hair can also protect them from the heat as well as insulating them from the cold.
We had Llama Pack races on one of the mountains just South of the valley, South Mountain. Very neat to be a part of that. And the first time I went to one of their meetings, The Southwest Llama association 2 people came to the meeting with Llamas in the back seat of their car~! I KNEW right then and there I was going to get along just great with this group.~! As you look at my avatar. lol
 

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Llama's make good pack animals. As far as livestock guarding goes, you should have one or two gelded males. Any more and they tend to stick together and ignore the flock they are supposed to be protecting. They do however "hate" dogs and have a nasty kick. A couple of coyotes can take down a single llama.

Their wool is only fair for spinning, it is coarser than alpaca and not much in demand. Though alpaca fleece is wonderful the market is flooded and hard to get rid of. Alpacas are not guard animals.

I have never heard of anyone milking a llama. If you decide to do it let me know, I want to come over and watch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
They do seem to get ate in S.America, but I don't find any cooking instructions.

I think the price of them is like the Ostrich thing, when they are New and exotic, the price is crazy. They paid $75K for a breeding trio at the local Ostrich ranch, 2 years later, they were 3-5K and the place was bankrupt.
Rock
 

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Yes, of course, they are the current trendy animal, but the curve has already turned down.

Most meats cook the same. Roasts, stew, etc. Any recipe for sheep or cabrito should work the same for llama or donkey or nutria.
 

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I bet they eat them in South America, but not sure anyone around here eats them.
A friend of ours had a llama in with his horses, the nastiest, meanest thing you ever saw. So he shot it, and turned it into sausage. I heard it was pretty good.
 

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Well, alot of people do respect the Dalia Lama *grin*
 
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