Labor Question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Bluebutterfly, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Bluebutterfly

    Bluebutterfly Well-Known Member

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    When a doe goes into labor.. How long does it normally take for her to give birth? I know that all goats are different but just wondering what the average time frame is.
    Also if there are twins or triplets.. how long does she rest before pushing out the next kid?
    Thanks,
    Bluebutterfly
     
  2. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    Every labor is different just like humans. You are looking at about 20 minutes of pushing for a first timer and about 10 for a doe that has previously kidded. I am talking about when they really get to bearing down pushing. If they are bearing down and pushing any longer than this it is time to go in and check to see what the problem is.
    As far as time between kids, a doe will generally push one out and have enough time to clean it off some and then will get to working on the next kid pretty quick. I have had the first kid hit the ground, I get the nose cleared and look up and the next kid is on the way out.
    If you have time to sit and think...what is going on here...you need to check the doe and make sure kids are presenting correctly.
    Hope this helps!
     

  3. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    There can be a lot of pushing early on. A hard push or two. Then she kind of forgets about it for a few minutes. Then another hard push or two. I had a doe do this for around two hours once. I went in and checked and couldn't feel any problems. Waited a little while longer, got worried and called the vet. The first kid made its appearance, in a normal presentation, just as the vet arrived. The vet (as is the habit of this particular vet) threw everything she had at the goat, including impatience. She dragged the first kid out, went back in and dragged out the next one, went in several times to drag out the placenta, then gave a calcium shot, antibiotics and painkillers. The bill was around $300. I now wait a LOT longer before calling her. Wouldn't call at all, but she's the only vet in the area that does goats, alas. :rolleyes:

    Anyway, the really hard pushing that you need to keep an eye on is when they push and strain and most often cry out. That's the serious labor that shouldn't last all that long. With my does, if they're quiet, they're not serious yet.
     
  4. Bluebutterfly

    Bluebutterfly Well-Known Member

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    What shots does the doe need through-out the pregnancy.
    I read to give her a CD/T about 4 weeks before kidding.
    Are there any others that the pregnant doe should have during the entire pregnancy?
    Thanks again,
    Bluebutterfly
     
  5. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    I give Bo-Se 2 weeks before kidding.
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    Make sure you live in a selenium deficient area before you give the shots. If you do, you need the bo se shots. But we are in a selenium rich area, and selenium toxicity is much the same symptoms as deficiency. Your extension office could tell you. I think I found out online somewhere also. Also worm the doe upon kidding. She will make better milk that way. Give the CDand T I give pneumonia vaccine to mine. Super polybac b somnus.
     
  7. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Does the pneumonia vax provide protection for the kids once they are born?
     
  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely Jillis. Using a vaccination will stimulate the does own immunity, this not only helps her to fight off disease faster (likely before you have even seen symptoms, but also increases the amount of immunity found in her colostrum for her kids. Kids who come from vaccinated mothers and/or were fed colostrum from vaccinated mothers, were sold this year from my herd into herds who had horrible problems with pnemonia. In all cases although some of the kids did get snotty noses, none ran fever and none died like many of their herdmates did. I know this is because I vaccinated the older does at my place, and also use only their colostrum on all kids born here. Older does colostrum is the most valuable thing on your place.

    I would hope those who choose not to vaccinate, or those who are working on trying to be more organic and not using wormers, would know and use this little trick. Vicki
     
  9. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No two does are exactly the same, but it isn't good to let a doe be in hard labor for a real long time without checking her to be sure a kid isn't hung up in the birth canal. A really good book on this subject is Raising Meat Goats for Profit by Gail Bowman.