Know of a good book on Homesteading?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Clifford, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. Clifford

    Clifford Love it, or leave it...

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    I've been looking for a good Adult NonFiction book on a family's experiences in homesteading.

    I just finished "Living the Good Life" by Helen and Scott Nerring and was not impressed by their mindeset, nor some of their methods.

    Anyone know of a good book that details experiences and makes for good reading?
     
  2. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    There is a book called "Crusoe of Lonesome Lake" which is a biography of a man named Ralph Edwards who homesteaded in British Columbia. There is a series of books that are spin-offs and sequels to it, as well. I believe there are five in all. You can check at the library and the dust covers of the books should have info on the other books in the series. There is one by his daughter Trudy, there is another by his sister-in-law called "Ruffles on my Long Johns", and Ralph Edwards (not particularly liking the biography) wrote his own autobiography.

    There is also a book (or series?) called Cabin at Singing River by Chris Czajkowski which I have not read but have heard is very good. The last I heard, she is still out in the wilderness living on her own.

    Long ago I also read a book (the name of which I don't recall) which is about a family which moved to Kodiak Island in the 1930's(?) and homesteaded there with not many neighbors.

    These are all older books, but you could probably track them down at a library and/or through interlibrary loan, or possibly on ebay.

    Good luck.

    MaryNY
     

  3. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    "Five acres and independence" is a good one. "Three acres enough" is another. Small Farmers Journal sells the second one.
    What didn't you like about Henen and Scott's book? Lack of animals? How they exploited people interested in their lifestyle to ease their own labors?
     
  4. Deb862

    Deb862 Well-Known Member

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    A couple I found to be good reads were:

    "Back from the Land: How Young Americans went to Nature in the 70s and Why they Came Back" by Eleanor Agnew. This was an interesting read as the author interviewed several people who began homesteading in the '70s movement, delves into their lives then and how they did it, and then outlines where they are today and whether they stayed or not and why.

    "Arctic Homstead: The True Story of one Family's Survival and Courage in the Alaskan Wilds" by Norma Cobb. Also, a pretty good read about a couple who were one of the last people to get real homestead land under the Homestead Act and how they have lived and survived there with their 3 children for 20 years.
     
  5. Clifford

    Clifford Love it, or leave it...

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    Their ideas were just a bit too extreme for my liking. No animals for meat as they didn't want to burden another being. Not even chickens for eggs... A bit much. Also, they sold off their made goods for no profit. A bit too liberal for me. I guess it worked for them, but they were a bit too hard on themeselves. IMHO.

    Thanks everyone for the book ideas. I've requested most of them from our library system and found most of them.
     
  6. mzzlisa

    mzzlisa Well-Known Member

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    "A Place in the Woods" by Helen Hoover is one of my favorites, and she wrote others too. Its out of print, but you can probably ask your library to find it.
    "This Organic Life" by Joan Dye Gussow is good also.
     
  7. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    A very recent one that I enjoyed was "Lambsquarters". It's about a Canadian couple who moved to rural Ontario (he's a dr, she was at home) and took up sheep farming.

    I loved the writing style and the gentle pace of the book, like snapshots of country living.
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Would you like this book? How to Build a Log Cabin and Homestead is a true story about how one family left the city, and how you can. It's about how a couple and their children, became independently wealthy, left the city, built a log cabin in the wilderness, grew a garden and thrived.

    Comments?

    All the best,

    Alex
     
  9. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    and the Foxfire books
     
  10. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    Glad you posted this.. I look foward to reading it.
     
  11. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    That's awesome, Alex!
     
  12. bubbba

    bubbba Well-Known Member

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    keep it coming Alex :)
    think im gonna bookmark this thread n start lookin for some of these books.

    Peace
     
  13. foxies

    foxies Well-Known Member

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    The Wilderness Mother By,Deanna Kawatski
     
  14. ldc

    ldc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow! Lovely, Alex! ldc
     
  15. lynpea

    lynpea Well-Known Member

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    A Very Small Farm , Paul William Winchestor........ I read this one every year to get me physced up for planting time
     
  16. TxGypsy

    TxGypsy Well-Known Member

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    2 Acre Eden by Gene Logsdon (actually I recommend just about anything by him)
     
  17. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    THANKS pcdreams, Laura, bubba, and Idc for the encouraging comments about How to Build a Log Cabin and Homestead. Just what I needed. I appreciate your time to read and comment.

    And SORRY for hyjacking this thread.

    Of course, my pick for a back-to-the-land-book is, Vena and Bradford Angier's,“At Home in the Woods, Living the Life of Thoreau Today,” 1951, 1972, Sheridan House, New York. Their book sure helped change our lives -- for the better.

    Thanks again,
    All the best,

    Alex
     
  18. Clifford

    Clifford Love it, or leave it...

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    Alex:

    Where can I find a copy? My library system doesn't have it...
     
  19. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    I bought several copies from here,alibris is here.

    We kept the original paper back as a shrine, which got us up north. And I bought a hard-copy when I found some on Alibirs.

    Enjoy,

    Alex
     
  20. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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    Paridise below zero by Calvin Rutstrum is interesting, looks like he has a lot of other stuff as well. I think Bradford Angier's book set me on the homestead quest. I second Artic Homestead, although the gold mining gets a little out of hand. North of the Sun is an OK read. Helen Hoover's book is pretty good, Hard Times in Paradise, by Colfax is OK. I agree on the Nearings, they are a bit strange. The Last American Man by Gilbert is interesting, the fellow lives near me in NC, I have met him, he seems like a cool guy, but what is really weird is how people idolize him. The name of his place is Turtle Island, which makes perfect sense, the people that work there are called Eustace's Turtles, and that seems about right because the seem to "belong" to him, almost cultish.