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Hello... I was attempting hand shearing for the first time and did knick the tip of my ewe's teat. We added hydrogen peroxide pretty immediately, and the bleeding stopped fairly quickly... Is there any other advice of what I should do?

Also, does this mean she is now compromised and shouldn't be bred in the future? I feel so ashamed and sad :( :( Both sheep and newbie shepherd (me) are now traumatized.

Thank you for advice...
 

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It happens. If she is nursing and it is bad, she might wean the lamb on that side. Sheep heal pretty good (lanolin). Had a ewe that had a shearing mishap that gave milk out the side of her teat and did just fine. It's just something you have to watch when they lamb which is a good idea for all of them anyway.

Be prepared for her to be either a fractious piece of work to a very well behaved girl next shearing. Have had them go both ways. Don't beat yourself up. Sheep kick, people slip, it's tiring work in less than optimal conditions, with a cutting tool, accidents happen. Always consider it a good day shearing when there are no missing human appendages. Took a pretty bad gash to the knee once. That's when I discovered the miraculous healing properties of lanolin.

On ewe lambs where it's easy to lose track of her teat in heavy wool, I like to find it and hold a thumb on it to keep it out of the way. It's easy to get there before you were expecting to be in heavy close wooled sheep.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It happens. If she is nursing and it is bad, she might wean the lamb on that side. Sheep heal pretty good (lanolin). Had a ewe that had a shearing mishap that gave milk out the side of her teat and did just fine. It's just something you have to watch when they lamb which is a good idea for all of them anyway.

Be prepared for her to be either a fractious piece of work to a very well behaved girl next shearing. Have had them go both ways. Don't beat yourself up. Sheep kick, people slip, it's tiring work in less than optimal conditions, with a cutting tool, accidents happen. Always consider it a good day shearing when there are no missing human appendages. Took a pretty bad gash to the knee once. That's when I discovered the miraculous healing properties of lanolin.

On ewe lambs where it's easy to lose track of her teat in heavy wool, I like to find it and hold a thumb on it to keep it out of the way. It's easy to get there before you were expecting to be in heavy close wooled sheep.

Thank you! I was panicking, but I’m feeling better about it now. I appreciate your reassuring response.
 
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