kitchen floor - need advice...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by barbarake, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. barbarake

    barbarake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    179
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Upstate SC
    Hi all - I'm looking for suggestions on what to do to improve my kitchen floor. I'm putting this house up for sale but I really need to do something about this because it looks awful.

    The original floor in the rest of the house is oak (solid tongue-and-groove). I have no idea if this went into the kitchen also but I suspect that it did. (Whatever was the original floor in the kitchen is the exact same level as the floor in the rest of the house.)

    Anyway, at some point in the past, 1/4" plywood was laid over the original floor. Then cheap sheet linoleum was laid on top of that. At some later point, those 12" square adhesive vinyl tiles was laid on top of that. They're ugly as sin, many have shifted a bit and they look horrible. But everything is stuck down very well (I know - I tried to see how easy they would be to remove :( )

    Anyway, what should I do?? I want to cover it with something. I'd like to use ceramic tile but would consider laminate (pergo woodgrain stuff). (Heck, I'd consider anything at this point.)

    The two layers of linoleum on are really stuck on - it would be a major hassle to get them off. I could use a circular saw set a 3/8" or so to cut through the linoleum and plywood and then pry up the plywood to get back to the original floor. Then lay ceramic tile on top of that.

    Or could I lay the ceramic tile on top of what's there?? The two layers of linoleum are not cushioned. I was told by the floor man in home depot that you could ceramic tile over *one* layer of linoleum but not *two*. Does anyone know if this is true or not??

    How about the laminate - could that go over two layers of linoleum??

    If I were keeping the house, I'd probably go to the hassle of getting back to the original floor and go from there. But that would take significant time/work and I'm not keeping the house - I'm selling it and I need to sell ASAP. I'd prefer the ceramic tile - it's relatively inexpensive yet still has a 'high-dollar' look.

    Any comments/suggestions would be much appreciated!!
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,854
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
    I would rough the old flooring and install a quality vinyl over the old in the situation you described. Your other options are a hassel or a headache!
     

  3. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    15,976
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan's thumb
    If the kitchen floor really brings down the value of the house, I'd rip it out and put down tile. However, some people do not like tile, so it's a matter of personal opinion. I think vinyl right over the present floor would work if vinyl isn't going to work against the rest of the house. Don't put down a cheap floor. Most people probably couldnt tell it's cheap when new, but those who can will wonder what else is second rate. Besides, it's only one room and a kitchen can sell the house.
     
    bryncalyn likes this.
  4. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    363
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Location:
    Land of the Long White Cloud
    I dont think you could successfully lay ceramic tile on floorboards. It would look bad right from the start. As Maura said the kitchen can sell the house, I personally think you should remove the lino & plywood and then sand & stain/polish the floor boards. You could ask a real estate agent what price impact your various options will have. You say you want to sell ASAP, doing a decent job may sell your house quicker.
     
  5. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,687
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    SC and soon to be NC
    mrs oz here :)

    While there are mortars available that are suitable to use to lay ceramic tile over vinyl, it's not the ideal situation. Besides, is it not becoming a height issue between the kitchen and adjoining room with so many layers of flooring? Any installer or tile person is going to tell you to tear out what is there and start over. If that's not an option because you are selling, I would look for other flooring materials that are suitable for your specific situation. Unfortunately, I can give no advise on what that flooring should be since the company I am with only deals with ceramic tile and natural stones....no wood or vinyl. I would think maybe one of those "floating" wood floors might work, if there is not a transition problem between rooms.
     
  6. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,435
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    We had nasty sheet vinyl with a layer of those stick on vinyl tiles in our kitchen. We removed the stick-on's (warm iron, putty knife and a whole lot of cussing) then laid 3 mil poly over the remaining sheet vinyl because there was a sticky residue left over from the vinyl tiles. We then used Armstrong Swift-Lock laminate floor. It was easy to install and looks great. We are also getting our house ready to sell and I estimate that the $$$ we spent redoing the floors in the kitchen, dining room, living room and hallway ended up being around $800 but the improvement on the way the house looks will almost certainly help sell our house (I'm hoping!!)
     
  7. barbarake

    barbarake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    179
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Upstate SC
    Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.

    I lean toward ceramic tile just because I 'like' it. It seems 'natural' to me (as opposed to that floating-floor, wood-grain laminate stuff (like 'Pergo') which seems too 'fake' (IMHO)). The home I'm moving to is 'real' - wood floors, ceramic tile, stone, etc.

    Also, ceramic tile doesn't have to be very expensive. Yes, there are some fancy tiles that cost an arm-and-a-leg - but you can buy your normal 12"x12", ceramic tile for around a dollar/sq.ft. The biggest cost is installation (which costs a fortune) but I'm doing that myself.

    (Just for the heck of it, I was looking at some of the good quality sheet vinyl - has anyone priced this lately??!!?! I was shocked - we're talking $3.00+ per sq.ft. *plus* installation, padding, etc. I think I could put it over the existing vinyl but the kitchen is an odd shape and there would either be multiple seams or *lots* of wastage. I've laid sheet vinyl and I'd prefer not to do it again - what a pain!! It would cost a fortune to do the kitchen. So that's out.)

    The other option seems to be the laminate. As I mentioned, I don't like it myself but I know it's popular and it's easy to put down and halfway reasonable (I can get it for about $2.50/sq.ft.). And there would be a lot less wastage (as compared to the sheet vinyl).

    If I laid it over the existing floor, the height differential would be 5/8" (I just measured :) ) I could live with that.

    Hmmm, I think I'm leaning toward the laminate. Getting up the old stuff just sounds like too much of a hassle right now.

    coalroadcabin - I'm in the same situation (sheet vinyl covered by stick on vinyl tiles). You said that you pulled up the vinyl tiles - do you really think that was necessary??

    Thanks again to everyone!!
     
  8. Critter183

    Critter183 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    51
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Location:
    Schenectady, NY
    I hate to do hack work, even if I'm selling or doing it on a rental property. (I used to own some before my divorce)

    I'd take off the two layers of floor and the plywood and start at the original floor. At least this way if the new owner doesn't like the floor, he isn't going to be cursing the bastich that did the hack job on it before he bought it.

    A little aside is that I like to police myself, so that others may not feel the need to police me. To cover up what is not right to make it look right, is deceiving. Once enough people get deceived, it invites a whole new level of regulatory and bureaucratic BS to be enacted by do gooders with fancy hats.
     
  9. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    951
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    If the height is not a problem you could just put a thin sheet of Lou-on (I know I'm not spelling that right but it's a thin plywood made especially for this type of thing) and then put self-stick tiles on that. My handyman husband does that a lot in rental houses he is working on if the landlord doesn't want to spend a lot of money but wants a good job that will hold up. best wishes.
     
  10. chris774

    chris774 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2004
    Location:
    ar
    if ur gonns put down ceramic the old vinyl works as a great anti fracture membrane which is highly suggested on a would sub floor if its a slab same thing but not as necessary
    sorry didn't take time to read all replies if some one has already made this point
     
  11. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,961
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2002
    Location:
    Georgia
    I house sat for a week at a friend's house that has ceramic tile in the kitchen. It looks pretty, but I hated it. It was so hard on my back standing on it. She doesn't cook, so she not in the kitchen much. I had wood floors in my kitchen and loved them. I'll put wood in my next house. They were easy to clean and easy on my back.