Kit problem...

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by thegriffiths, Aug 5, 2004.

  1. thegriffiths

    thegriffiths Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    186
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2004
    Location:
    Charleston, WV
    I have one kit that has a clump of manure covering her entire behind. I am about to go back out and clean her off but I was wondering if there was anything abnormal about this.

    I am unsure of the best way to restrain her so I can do the job. My wife is away for the week at a funeral so I dont have any help around.

    Any info would be helpful.

    Thanks,

    M Griffith
     
  2. TINYMARIA

    TINYMARIA Active Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I had this happen to one of my kits awhile ago. I took her and held her under the sink faucet with luke warm water to get it all off. Dried her really good with a towel and then I put some antibiotic ointment on the area. It didnt look very good when I was done, but she is just fine now.
     

  3. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,387
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Location:
    Washington
    I'll answer your restraining question with another question... "how do you restrain a small child who needs to receive a shot?" The answer is, of course: "The best way that you possibly can!" The same applies with restraining a rabbit. However, if the kit is large enough to tuck its head under your left arm (assuming you are right handed) will help considerably. Rabbits seem to think they're part ostrich... if they can't see what's going on, then, they calm right down, so you need to be sure the eyes are covered by your arm and side. This leaves the hindquarters free to work on.

    Removing the clump won't solve the problem, of course. You also need to treat the cause! Force-feeding plain yogurt (with live enzyme) should do the trick. Can't overdose with yogurt, either, and it will re-establish the intestinal flora in the rabbits hind gut. Simply repeat as needed and keep a close watch on the droppings.

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Assocation
    http://www.prma.org/